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The Daily

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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The Fate of Trump's Financial Records

The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that President Trump cannot block the release of his financial records. Today, we hear the story behind the cases the justices heard ? and the meaning of their decisions.

Guests: David Enrich, the business investigations editor for The New York Times and Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

The Court cleared the way for prosecutors in New York to seek President Trump?s financial records ? but stopped Congress from accessing the records by subpoena for now.Our chief White House correspondent writes that the Supreme Court affirmed the power of judicial independence by dismissing President Trump?s claims of immunity.
2020-07-10
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A Missed Warning About Silent Coronavirus Infections

At the end of January, long before the world understood that seemingly healthy people could spread the coronavirus, a doctor in Germany tried to sound the alarm. Today, we look at why that warning was unwelcome.

Guests: Matt Apuzzo, an investigative reporter for The New York Times based in Brussels.

Dr. Camilla Rothe, an infectious disease specialist at Munich University Hospital.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

At the end of March, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that as many as 25 percent of those infected by the coronavirus may not show symptoms.Some scientists have criticized the World Health Organization over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic, saying its statements and advice sometimes lag behind research.
2020-07-09
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Counting the Infected

For months, the U.S. government has been quietly collecting information on hundreds of thousands of coronavirus cases across the country. Today, we tell the story of how The Times got hold of that data, and what it says about the nation?s outbreak.

Plus: a conversation with three U.S. astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

Guests: Robert Gebeloff, a reporter for The New York Times specializing in data analysis.

Bob Behnken, Doug Hurley and Chris Cassidy, NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

The C.D.C. figures provide the fullest and most extensive look yet at the racial inequity of the coronavirus.A Times analysis published in late May found that Democrats were far more likely to live in counties that had been ravaged by the virus, while Republicans were more likely to live in counties that had been relatively unscathed.A team of New York Times journalists is also working to track every coronavirus case in the United States, and The Times has made its data open to the public.
2020-07-08
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?Their Goal Is the End of America?

What President Trump?s divisive speech at Mount Rushmore reveals about his re-election campaign.

Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Missteps by a fractured campaign and a series of self-inflicted wounds added up to a very bad June for President Trump.In speeches at the White House and Mount Rushmore last weekend, the president promoted a version of the ?American carnage? vision from his inaugural address.
2020-07-07
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Four New Insights About the Coronavirus

Infection rates broke records across the United States over the holiday weekend, with many of the most severe surges in areas that reopened fastest. One thing that seems to have played a factor: transmission indoors, such as in restaurants and bars. We break down the risk, and look at what else scientists have learned about the coronavirus and how it spreads. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Many scientists have been saying for months that the coronavirus lingers in the air indoors, infecting those nearby. But the World Health Organization has been slow to agree.Black and Latino residents of the United States are nearly twice as likely to die from Covid-19 as their white neighbors, according to new data that provides the most comprehensive look yet at coronavirus patients in America.
2020-07-06
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What Went Wrong in Brazil

Brazil has a long, distinguished history of successfully navigating public health crises. But in recent weeks, it has emerged as one of the world?s most severe coronavirus hot spots, second only to the United States. What went wrong? 

Guest: Ernesto Londoño, The Times?s Brazil bureau chief

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Here?s an overview of what you need to know about the coronavirus in Brazil.The country?s pioneering responses to past health crises, including AIDS and Zika, won global praise.
2020-07-02
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A Russian Plot to Kill U.S. Soldiers

A New York Times investigation has revealed evidence of a secret Russian operation to kill U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan ? and of the failure of the Trump administration to act on that intelligence. As lawmakers from both parties react with fury, one of the journalists who first reported the story tells us what has come to light so far.

Guest: Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

The Times reported on Monday that President Trump was provided a written briefing on the intelligence about the suspected Russian plot in late February.?If it does come out as true, obviously the heartache would be terrible,? said the father of a Marine who died in a 2019 car bombing in Afghanistan, which is reportedly the focus of investigators? work.
2020-07-01
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A Major Ruling on Abortion

The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Louisiana law that could have left the state with a single abortion clinic. It was a setback for conservatives in the first major ruling on abortion since two Trump appointees joined the bench. We examine the implications for future challenges, and why ? for the third time in two weeks ? Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. sided with his four more liberal colleagues.

Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Chief Justice Roberts also voted with the court?s liberal wing in rulings on job discrimination against L.G.B.T.Q. workers and on a program protecting young immigrants.The ruling on Monday stalled anti-abortion momentum for now, but the movement has a long pipeline of new cases.Justice Stephen G. Breyer wrote that the Louisiana law was ?almost word-for-word identical? to a law from Texas, which the court struck down in 2016.
2020-06-30
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A Conversation With a Police Union Leader

In the weeks since George Floyd was killed by the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, Americans have been confronting hard questions about bias and racism within law enforcement ? and what the role of the police should be.

In the process, many have asked whether the culture of policing can be changed or if the system needs to be reimagined entirely. Today, we talk to an officer at the center of that debate inside one of the country?s largest police unions.

Guest: Vince Champion, the southeast regional director of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Protesters across the country are calling for the abolition of police forces. But what would that actually look like?Last week, the House passed a sweeping police overhaul bill, aimed at combating racial bias and excessive use of force, by a vote of 236 to 181. The bill is not expected to pass the Republican-controlled Senate.
2020-06-29
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The Sunday Read: 'The Man Who Saw America'

In this episode of The Sunday Read, we look at the complexity, diversity and humanity of America through the eyes of Robert Frank ? one of the most influential photographers in history ? who, through his camera, collected the world.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-06-28
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A Bit of Relief: The Long Distance Chorus

Gregg Breinberg has been directing the chorus at Public School 22 on Staten Island for twenty years. He tells his fourth and fifth grade students that participation is not about whether they can sing on key or not. It?s about expressing the meaning of a song ? and the music inside themselves. Today, we listen to the voices of P.S. 22 as they harmonize from afar.

2020-06-27
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A Dilemma in Texas

Texas has become the latest hot spot in the coronavirus pandemic, forcing its governor to pause the state?s reopening process after a surge of infections and hospitalizations. We speak with our Houston correspondent about the state?s dilemma. Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times?s bureau chief in Houston. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

A growing number of state leaders are pausing plans to reopen as case counts rise. Among them is Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas, who did so reluctantly after facing mounting pressure in the Republican-controlled state.We analyzed travel patterns, hidden infections and genetic data to show how the epidemic has spun out of control in the United States.
2020-06-26
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The Voters Trump Is Losing

This fall?s presidential race is likely to be decided by a handful of battleground states won by President Trump in 2016. So how do voters in those states view the candidates? Guest: Nate Cohn, who covers elections, polling and demographics for The Upshot at The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

A New York Times/Siena College poll found that Joseph R. Biden Jr. is ahead of the president by 14 points, leading among women and nonwhite voters and cutting into his support with white voters.
2020-06-25
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The Epidemic of Unemployment

Three months after mass layoffs began across America, 20 million Americans remain out of work because of the pandemic. Federal employment benefits are about to run out, and Congress can?t agree on more financial help. We called people struggling with unemployment to hear how they are doing. Guest: Julie Creswell, Sabrina Tavernise and Ben Casselman, reporters at The New York Times, spoke with Nicolle Nordman, Analía Rodríguez and Nakitta Long about being laid off. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Some people have started to return to work, but the recovery is uneven. More than a million new jobless claims continue to be filed each week, and certain industries are far outpacing others in the rebound from the mass job losses in April.The unemployment rate isn?t the whole story when it comes to understanding the economic impact of the pandemic.
2020-06-24
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The Battle Over the Democratic Party's Future

This episode contains strong language. 

Today?s Senate primary in Kentucky has been transformed by the outcry over police brutality. What can the election tell us about the future of Democratic politics? Guest: Jonathan Martin, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Amy McGrath was considered a safe bet in the Democratic primary in Kentucky. But the recent movement for racial justice has elevated the candidacy of her African-American rival, Charles Booker, in the race to defeat Mitch McConnell.
2020-06-23
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How Facebook Is Undermining Black Lives Matter

Companies like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have come out in support of Black Lives Matter and its mission. But are their platforms undermining the movement for racial justice? Guest: Kevin Roose, who covers technology, business and culture for The Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Kevin Roose explains why shows of support for Black Lives Matter from Facebook, Twitter and YouTube don?t address the way racists and partisan provocateurs have weaponized the platforms.
2020-06-22
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The Sunday Read: 'Facing the Wind'

In today?s episode of The Sunday Read, Carvell Wallace considers why, for his kids, a global pandemic that shut down the world was not news ? it was the opposite of news. It was a struggle that had, in some ways, always been a part of their lives.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-06-21
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The History and Meaning of Juneteenth

After 155 years, Juneteenth, a celebration of the emancipation of enslaved Americans, is being acknowledged as a holiday by corporations and state governments across the country. Today, we consider why, throughout its history, Juneteenth has gained prominence at moments of pain in the struggle for black liberation in America. We also ask: What does freedom mean now?

Guest: Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, a professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

In a project examining the history and import of Juneteenth, we ask: What is freedom in America?Opal Lee, 93, an activist and lifelong Texan, has campaigned to make June 19 a national holiday for years. This is her vision for honoring the emancipation of enslaved Americans.
2020-06-19
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The Latest: The Supreme Court Rules on DACA

In a 5-to-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that President Trump may not shut down Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, the program that shields immigrants brought to the United States as children from deportation. But is this the end of challenges to DACA?

?The Latest,? from the team behind ?The Daily,? brings you the most important developments on today?s biggest news stories.

Host: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.

Background reading:

This is the reasoning Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. gave for reversing the Trump administration decision.For thousands of ?Dreamers,? as DACA recipients are known, following the ups and downs of the program?s fate has been a wild ride. Here?s why it?s not over yet.
2020-06-18
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Who Will Be Joe Biden?s Running Mate?

Joseph R. Biden Jr. is looking for a potential vice president in one of the most tumultuous moments in modern American history. His selection committee is attempting to winnow an exceptionally diverse field. So who?s on the list? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

This is where the top candidates stand in Mr. Biden?s search for a running mate.
2020-06-18
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The Killing of Rayshard Brooks

This episode contains strong language.

Rayshard Brooks fell asleep in his car at a Wendy?s drive-through. Soon afterward, he was shot. We look closely at what happened in the minutes in between ? and at the unrest his killing has sparked in Georgia.

Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Here is our visual investigation into how Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed by the Atlanta police.The resignation of Atlanta?s police chief, Erika Shields, was the latest in a series of shake-ups at several large police departments.
2020-06-17
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A Landmark Supreme Court Ruling

The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay and transgender workers from workplace discrimination. We examine the three words the case hung on; what the written opinions had to say about bathrooms, locker rooms, sports, pronouns and religious objections to same-sex marriage; and the implications for the ruling. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times and Aimee Stephens, the lead plaintiff in a transgender discrimination case heard by the Supreme Court. Ms. Stephens died in May; she was 59. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Ms. Stephens was fired after she announced that she would live as a woman. She did not live to see the Supreme Court rule in her favor.Until Monday?s decision, it was legal in more than half of the states to fire workers for being gay, bisexual or transgender.The justices are confronting an unusually potent mix of political and social issues in the middle of both a presidential election year and a public health crisis. Here?s an overview of the major cases this year to get you up to speed.
2020-06-16
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What We?ve Learned About the Coronavirus

States are reopening. Parks are crowded. Restaurants are filling, again, with diners. But is this dangerous? Six months into the pandemic, we reflect on what we?ve learned about the virus ? and ask how that knowledge should chart the course forward. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

As New York businesses reopened, Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned that a second wave of infections was almost inevitable if residents did not abide by social-distancing rules. ?It will come,? he said. ?And once it comes, it?s too late.? Restrictions are easing across the United States, but Arizona, Florida and Texas are reporting their highest case numbers yet. As of Saturday, coronavirus cases were climbing in 22 states.
2020-06-15
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The Sunday Read: 'Getting Out'

In this episode of The Sunday Read, one man reflects on what it was like to go to prison as a child and to attempt to become an attorney upon his release. In doing so, he asks: What is punishment in America? What is it for? And how should we think about it?

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-06-14
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Special Episode: The Song That Found Me

The Times critic Wesley Morris had listened to Patti LaBelle?s live rendition of ?If You Don?t Know Me by Now? over a hundred times before. But one recent Sunday, the song came on and he heard something new. ?I heard her thinking through an ultimatum now being laid down in the streets of this country,? he went on to write. Soon after, he got a call from one Ms. Patti LaBelle.

2020-06-13
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The Struggle to Teach From Afar

Ronda McIntyre?s classroom is built around a big rug, where her students crowd together often for group instruction. But since March, when schools across the country shut down because of the coronavirus, she has had to try to create the same sense of community remotely. Her class, and her job, are not the same ? and they may never be.

Guest: Ronda McIntyre, a grade-school teacher at Indianola Informal K-8 school in Columbus, Ohio. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Elizabeth A. Harris, a Times reporter, spoke with Ms. McIntyre earlier this year in the course of reporting about the frustrations of parents trying to do their jobs while helping children with class work.The realities of remote learning for fourteen other teachers, in illustrated vignettes.Restarting classes is central to reviving economies. But even as students in Europe return to school, a question hangs over the efforts: What?s the risk of children getting, and spreading, the virus?
2020-06-12
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Georgia's Election Meltdown

A full-scale meltdown of new voting systems in Georgia is alarming Democratic leaders ? and revealing a new national playing field ? ahead of the general election in November. Today, we explore why voting access in Georgia has become a national issue for the party.

Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Long lines and malfunctioning voting machines marred Georgia primary elections, renewing attention on voting rights there, and raising questions about how to ensure access to voting in the general election.With both Senate seats in play and President Trump up for re-election in November, Georgia Democrats are telling anyone who will listen: This time will be different.
2020-06-11
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?I Want To Touch the World?

This episode contains strong language.

Nearly 30 years ago, George Perry Floyd Jr. told a high school classmate he would ?touch the world? someday. We went to the funeral in Houston of an outsize man who dreamed equally big and whose killing has galvanized a movement against racism across the globe.

Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times?s bureau chief in Houston.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Mr. Floyd?s funeral served as both a national reckoning and a moment of personal mourning. The Rev. Al Sharpton demanded more action against police brutality.As a young man, Mr. Floyd had big plans for his future. This is the story of his life and dreams.
2020-06-10
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The Case For Defunding the Police

This episode contains strong language.

Several major U.S. cities are proposing ways to defund and even dismantle their police departments. But what would that actually look like? Guest: John Eligon, a national correspondent covering race for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

In protests across the country, pleas for changes in policing have ranged from reform to abolition. Some proposed measures include restricting police use of military-style equipment and requiring officers to face strict discipline in cases of misconduct.Nine members of the Minneapolis City Council ? a veto-proof majority ? pledged to dismantle the city?s Police Department, promising to create a new system of public safety.
2020-06-09
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Why Are Police Attacking Protestors?

This episode contains strong language.

Across the country, the police have responded to protests over police brutality with more force. Today, we listen in on confrontations at demonstrations in New York. Guest: Ali Watkins, a crime and law enforcement reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Across the country, police officers have responded to growing protests over police brutality with increasingly violent crowd control techniques, using batons, tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets on protesters, bystanders and journalists.In New York, officers have charged and swung batons at demonstrators after curfew with seemingly little provocation. The mayor said he would review any reports of inappropriate enforcement.
2020-06-08
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The Sunday Read: 'The Condition of Black Life Is One of Mourning?

Today on ?The Sunday Read,? listen to Claudia Rankine reflect on the precariousness of being black in America. Her words were written five years ago after avowed white supremacist Dylann Roof killed nine black people at a Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina. We are revisiting them now that they have ? yet again ? been rendered relevant.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-06-07
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'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 8: 'We Go All'

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we?re sharing the series finale of ?Rabbit Hole,? a Times podcast with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, we follow one QAnon believer?s journey through faith and loss ? and what becomes of reality as our lives move online.

For more information on ?Rabbit Hole? and today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole

2020-06-06
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Why They're Protesting

This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs.

They came together to protest the killing of George Floyd ? and because what happened to him had echoes in their own experiences. Today, we speak with five protesters about the moments in their lives that brought them onto the streets.

Guests: Donfard Hubbard, 44, from Minneapolis; Rashaad Dinkins, 18, from Minneapolis; Joe Morris, 32, from Tallahassee, Fla.; Azalea Hernandez, 12, from Minneapolis; and Joyce Ladner, 76, from Washington. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2020-06-05
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The Showdown at Lafayette Square

This episode contains sounds of explosives and descriptions of violence.

Today, we go inside a high-stakes White House debate over how President Trump should respond to reports that he was hiding in a bunker while the nation?s capital burned. This is the story of what happened in Lafayette Square. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Our chief White House correspondent explains why, when the history of the Trump presidency is written, the clash with protesters that preceded President Trump?s walk across Lafayette Square may be remembered as one of its defining moments.?He did not pray,? said Mariann E. Budde, the Episcopal bishop of Washington, said of Mr. Trump?s militarized visit to St. John?s church for a photo opportunity. ?He did not mention George Floyd.?
2020-06-04
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The Mayor of Minneapolis

As nationwide protests about the death of George Floyd enter a second week, we speak with the leader of the city where they began. Guest: Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Mr. Frey came into office in 2018 on promises to fix the broken relationship between the community and law enforcement in the wake of two fatal police shootings. This is what he has done in the years since.
2020-06-03
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The Systems That Protect the Police

The Minneapolis police officer whose tactics led to George Floyd?s death had a long record of complaints against him. So why was he still on patrol? Guest: Shaila Dewan, a national reporter covering criminal justice for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Efforts to hold problem officers accountable often face resistance from unions, and juries are reluctant to second-guess police decisions.Violence escalated overnight in protests across the country, with police officers under fire in St. Louis and Las Vegas. Here are the latest updates.
2020-06-02
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A Weekend of Pain and Protest

This episode contains strong language.

Demonstrations have erupted in at least 140 cities across the United States in the days since George Floyd, a black man, died in police custody in Minneapolis. We were on the ground in some of them, chronicling 72 hours of pain and protest. Guests: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine; John Eligon, a national correspondent who covers race for The Times; and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

The video discussed by Nikole Hannah-Jones in the episode is featured here.The Times has reporters on the ground in dozens of cities across the country. Here?s a look at what they?re seeing.George Floyd died one week ago today. Here?s a timeline of what has happened since.
2020-06-01
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'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 7: 'Where We Go One'

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we?re sharing Episode 7 of ?Rabbit Hole,? a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, our reporter investigates the QAnon conspiracy theories. The story of QAnon believers, united in a battle against what they see as dark forces of the world, reveals where the internet is headed.

For more information on ?Rabbit Hole? and today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole.

2020-05-30
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Special Episode: The Latest From Minneapolis

As protests spread over the death of George Floyd, the former officer at the center of the case has been charged with murder. We listen in on the demonstrations, and examine why this tragedy ? though too familiar ? may be a turning point. Guest: Audra D. S. Burch, a national enterprise correspondent for The Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Derek Chauvin, a former police officer, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for kneeling on the neck of Mr. Floyd for nearly nine minutes as he repeatedly pleaded ?I can?t breathe.?In the year before their fatal encounter, Mr. Floyd and Mr. Chauvin worked at the same nightclub.Protests over racism and police violence have erupted across the U.S. Follow the latest updates.
2020-05-30
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One Hundred Thousand Lives

Barbara Krupke won the lottery. Fred Walter Gray enjoyed his bacon and hash browns crispy. Orlando Moncada crawled through a hole in a fence to reach the United States. John Prine chronicled the human condition. Cornelia Ann Hunt left the world with gratitude.

Over 100,000 people have died from the coronavirus in the United States. Today, we glimpse inside the lives of just a few of them.

Background reading: 

Memories collected from obituaries across the country help us visualize and reckon with the incalculable loss of more than 100,000 lives.
2020-05-29
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Space Travel, Privatized

After nearly a decade on the sidelines of space travel, Cape Canaveral is again launching a shuttle into space. But this time, a private company will be sending NASA astronauts into orbit. What does this moment mean for human exploration of the solar system? Guests: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Here?s a look inside the vessel that is scheduled to become the first crewed spacecraft launched in the United States since the end of the shuttle program in 2011.Meet SpaceX?s first NASA astronauts: Robert L. Behnken and Douglas G. Hurley, who have been friends and colleagues for two decades.
2020-05-28
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Can the Postal Service Survive the Pandemic?

The U.S. Postal Service has survived the telegraph, the fax machine and the dawn of the internet. But will it survive coronavirus? Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times and Derek Harpe, a Postal Service worker with a mail route in Mocksville, N.C. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

With the coronavirus threatening the Postal Service?s financial viability, a rescue for the organization has become a political battle.
2020-05-27
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The Story of Two Brothers From Mexico

Two brothers, Javier Morales, 48, and Martin Morales, 39, died of coronavirus within hours of each other in their adopted home of New Jersey. Their last wish was to be buried at home in Mexico, but, to make that happen, their family must navigate the vast bureaucracies of two countries, international airfare and the complications of a pandemic. Guest:Annie Correal, an immigration reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shaila and Melanie Cruz Morales, twin sisters from New Jersey who are the men?s nieces. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

In Mexico, being buried near home is a sacred rite. These are the obstacles the Morales family has faced as they try to return their uncles? bodies home.
2020-05-26
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'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 6: Impasse

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we?re sharing Episode 6 of ?Rabbit Hole,? a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, we hear from PewDiePie, one of the biggest and most polarizing YouTube celebrities. He sat down with our reporter to discuss how he?s coming to grips with his influence ? and looking to the future.

If you're tuning in to ?Rabbit Hole? for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.

2020-05-23
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Genie Chance and the Great Alaska Earthquake

There are moments when the world we take for granted changes instantaneously ? when reality is upended and replaced with the unimaginable. Though we try not to think about it, instability is always lurking, and at any moment, a kind of terrible magic can switch on and scramble our lives. 

You may know the feeling.

In 1964, it happened to Anchorage, Alaska, and to a woman named Genie Chance. Today, the author Jon Mooallem tells her story ? and the story of the biggest earthquake to hit North America in recorded history ? using sonic postcards from the past.

Guest: Jon Mooallem, author of the book ?This Is Chance.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2020-05-22
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A Teenager?s Medical Mystery

From the earliest days of the coronavirus outbreak, health officials believed that it was largely sparing children and teenagers. But the rise of a mysterious inflammatory syndrome ? with symptoms ranging from rashes to heart failure ? in children testing positive for the virus is challenging that belief. Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, spoke with Jack McMorrow, 14, and his parents in Queens about his experience contracting the coronavirus. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

?If I send you home today, you?ll be dead by tomorrow.? This is what Jack heard after learning he had a mysterious illness connected to the coronavirus in children. ?I would say that scared me to death but it more like scared me to life.?The new syndrome has been compared to a rare childhood illness called Kawasaki disease. But doctors have learned that it affects the heart differently and is appearing mostly in school-age children, rather than infants and toddlers.
2020-05-21
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Why Is the Pandemic Killing So Many Black Americans?

Some have called the pandemic ?the great equalizer.?  But the coronavirus is killing black Americans at staggeringly higher rates than white Americans. Today, we explore why. Guest: Linda Villarosa, a writer for The New York Times Magazine covering racial health disparities, who spoke to Nicole Charles in New Orleans, La. about the death of her husband, Cornell Charles, known as Dickey. He was 51. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

How Mardi Gras accelerated the spread of the coronavirus among an already vulnerable population in New Orleans.The coronavirus has killed black and Latino people in New York City at twice the rate that it has killed white people. Black Britons are also twice as likely to die from coronavirus.Black Americans can face subconscious bias from medical professionals when they seek care. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have advised health professionals to be on the lookout for such bias, but some say the issue is far more systemic.
2020-05-20
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Trump?s Purge of the Watchdogs

It used to be rare for a president to fire an inspector general, a position created within government agencies after Watergate and assigned to fight waste and corruption. Today, we look at what President Trump?s pattern of replacing inspectors general reveals about the nature of the independent office ? and about presidential power. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Mr. Trump decided to fire Steve A. Linick, the Department of State?s inspector general, last week. Mr. Linick had opened an investigation into Secretary of State Mike Pompeo?s spending habits. Congressional Democrats have now opened an investigation into the firing.The president also recently fired the intelligence community?s inspector general. Our chief White House correspondent explains why Mr. Trump?s drive against those he considers disloyal continues even during a pandemic.
2020-05-19
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Can Government Spending Save the Economy?

As the American economy plunges toward a recession, economists and policymakers are triaging proposals to stanch the bleeding. All of their ideas will cost money the government doesn?t have. That leaves Democrats and Republicans with two major questions: How much should be borrowed for bailouts ? and what spending is needed to avoid permanent economic damage?  Guest: Ben Casselman, an economics reporter at The New York Times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jerome H. Powell, the Federal Reserve chair, has urged Congress to spend more on economic relief ? even if doing so means increasing the federal deficit. He warned that the United States was experiencing an economic hit ?without modern precedent.?
2020-05-18
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The Sunday Read: 'Letters of Recommendation'

Our worlds have contracted; once expansive, our orbits are now measured by rooms and street blocks. But there are still ways to travel. Today, escape to the worlds contained in three letters ? one about the summer of 1910, another describing an upended misconception and a third about how superstitions can offer release. We hope they can offer you some meaning ? or at least a distraction.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-05-17
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