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The Daily

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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A Criminal Underworld of Child Abuse, Part 1

Note: This episode contains descriptions of child sexual abuse.

A monthslong New York Times investigation has uncovered a digital underworld of child sexual abuse imagery that is hiding in plain sight. In part one of a two-part series, we look at the almost unfathomable scale of the problem ? and just how little is being done to stop it. Guests: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Last year, tech companies reported over 60 million online photos and videos of children being sexually abused. Lawmakers foresaw this crisis years ago, but enforcement has fallen short. Our reporters investigated the problem and asked: Can it be stopped?Tech companies detected a surge in online videos of child sexual abuse last year, with encrypted social messaging apps enabling abusers to share images under a cloak of secrecy.Here are six takeaways from The Times?s investigation of the boom in online child sex abuse.
2020-02-19
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Michael Bloomberg?s Not-So-Secret Weapon

Despite being a late entry into the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, Michael R. Bloomberg, the billionaire media tycoon and former mayor of New York City, has surged in the polls and is winning key endorsements before he?s even on the ballot. Today, we explore the hidden infrastructure of influence and persuasion behind his campaign ? and the dilemma it poses for Democrats. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Who is Mr. Bloomberg? And where does he stand on the key issues?We took a look at how Mr. Bloomberg?s enormous wealth helped build a national political network, and an empire of influence, for his campaign.His run has proved complicated to cover for the media empire he owns.
2020-02-18
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The Post-Acquittal Presidency

Since his acquittal in the Senate, President Trump has undertaken a campaign of retribution against those who crossed him during the impeachment inquiry ? while extending favors to those who have tried to protect him. Today, we explore what has happened so far in this new phase of his presidency. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mr. Trump called those who testified against him in the impeachment ?evil,? ?corrupt? and ?crooked.? After he was acquitted, he began firing witnesses.A handful of senators reached out to the White House to warn the president not to dismiss Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union who testified in the House hearings. Mr. Trump removed him anyway.
2020-02-14
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Fear, Fury and the Coronavirus

Note: This episode contains strong language in both English and Mandarin.

What started as a story about fear of a new and dangerous virus has become a story of fury over the Chinese government?s handling of an epidemic. Today, one of our China correspondents takes us behind the scenes of Beijing?s response to a global outbreak. Guest: Amy Qin, a China correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

President Xi Jinping faces an accelerating health crisis that is also a political one: a profound test of the authoritarian system he has built around himself over the past seven years.China?s leader, who rarely mingles with the public, visited several sites in Beijing and spoke to medical workers in Wuhan via video conferencing.Here are the latest updates on the global outbreak.
2020-02-13
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The Results From New Hampshire

Senator Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire?s Democratic primary last night, with Pete Buttigieg and Senator Amy Klobuchar close behind in second and third. After two candidates once considered front-runners, Senator Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden, finished toward the back of the pack, we consider what Mr. Sanders?s win means for the rest of the race for the Democratic nomination. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

With his New Hampshire win, Mr. Sanders tightened his grip on the Democratic Party?s liberal wing, benefiting from a field that has divided moderate voters.Here are the full results. Unlike in Iowa, where we have yet to declare an official winner, we can confidently say Mr. Sanders won in New Hampshire in a tight race with Mr. Buttigieg.
2020-02-12
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The Field: The Aftershocks of Iowa in New Hampshire

Voters in New Hampshire pride themselves on helping winnow the nomination field. While many polls show Senator Bernie Sanders leading in this year?s primary, the caucus debacle in Iowa meant no single candidate left that first contest with full momentum. We flew from Iowa to New Hampshire, following the campaign trail and talking to voters about whether Democrats who don?t support Sanders are coalescing around another choice.

Guests: Lisa Lerer, a reporter at The New York Times, covering campaigns, elections and political power, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Jessica Cheung, producers on ?The Daily.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading: 

Mr. Sanders and Mayor Pete Buttigieg, of South Bend, Ind., are hoping to make the race for the nomination a two-person contest.Still, after a voting fiasco in Iowa, it?s possible that five leading candidates will survive beyond New Hampshire.President Trump is coming to New Hampshire, too: He?s scheduled to hold a campaign rally in Manchester tonight and will be on the Republican ballot Tuesday. Here are the latest updates from the state?s last day of primary campaigning.
2020-02-11
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The End of Privacy as We Know It?

A secretive start-up promising the next generation of facial recognition software has compiled a database of images far bigger than anything ever constructed by the United States government: over three billion, it says. Is this technology a breakthrough for law enforcement ? or the end of privacy as we know it?

Guest: Annie Brown, a producer on ?The Daily,? spoke with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Federal and state law enforcement officers are using one company?s app to make arrests in 49 states. So what is Clearview AI, and what influence does it hold?Clearview?s app is being used by police to identify victims of child sexual abuse. Some question both the ethics and the accuracy of the results.
2020-02-10
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The Woman Defending Harvey Weinstein

Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.

In the trial of Harvey Weinstein, six women have taken the stand, each making similar accusations of rape and sexual assault against the movie producer. Throughout their testimony, Weinstein?s defense lawyers have portrayed those encounters as consensual and suggested that in many cases it was the women who wanted something from Mr. Weinstein. His lawyers have seized on the fact that the two women whose accounts are at the center of the criminal charges in his New York trial agreed to have sex and friendly contact with Mr. Weinstein after they were allegedly victimized. Today, one of The Times reporters who broke the story of Mr. Weinstein?s alleged abuse more than two years ago speaks with Donna Rotunno, the lawyer behind Mr. Weinstein?s legal strategy.

Guests: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of ?She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement," spoke with Donna Rotunno, Harvey Weinstein?s lead defense lawyer. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Long before an avalanche of allegations against Mr. Weinstein set off a global reckoning over sexual harassment, Ms. Rotunno was steadily building a career as a criminal lawyer in Chicago with an unusual specialty: defending men accused of sex crimes.Haven?t been following the trial? Here?s what?s happened so far.
2020-02-07
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Mitt Romney?s Lonely Vote

President Trump was acquitted by the Senate on Wednesday of both articles of impeachment. While the vote largely fell along party lines, one senator crossed the aisle to vote to convict him. Today, we hear from Senator Mitt Romney about that choice.

Guest: Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, who spoke with Mark Leibovich, the Washington-based chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

In a speech before voting to convict, Mr. Romney grew emotional as he pronounced the president ?guilty of an appalling abuse of public trust.??I think this is Senator Romney?s moment to shine,? Senator Amy Klobuchar said before the vote, ?I hope he can bring some people with him.? Here?s a behind-the-scenes look at Mr. Romney?s isolation in the Senate and the expectations placed on him before his vote.
2020-02-06
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The State of the Union

Hours after Iowa kicked off the process to choose President Trump?s 2020 opponent, and just a day before the verdict is expected in his Senate impeachment trial, the president gave his third State of the Union address. Today, we take you to The New York Times?s Washington bureau, where we examined the speech ? and the unique moment in which it was delivered.

Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Though Mr. Trump didn?t mention impeachment, the process hung over his address, and his refusal to shake Speaker Nancy Pelosi?s hand put the bitterness between them on full display.The speech sounded like a re-election pitch, with the president claiming credit for a ?great American comeback.?
2020-02-05
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The Latest: What Happened in Iowa?

After a night of chaos and confusion at the Iowa caucuses, and nearly a full day since the results were initially expected, the state?s Democratic Party has announced only partial numbers, from 62 percent of precincts. We look at what the debacle in Iowa will mean for the results ? when they?re finally released.

?The Latest,? from the team behind ?The Daily,? brings you the most important developments on today?s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

2020-02-05
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A Very Long Night In Iowa

The kickoff to the 2020 voting was undercut Monday night by major delays in the reporting of the Iowa caucus results. We traveled to Johnston, Iowa, to tell the story of the day ? from the perspective of one caucus in a middle school gym. Guests: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times and Reid J. Epstein, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

A new system of reporting caucus results led to confusion and few solid numbers ? forcing the Iowa Democratic Party to delay the release of results until a winner could be verified later Tuesday.Here?s where you can see live results as they become available.
2020-02-04
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The Field: Iowa?s Electability Complex

With Iowa voters making their choice and the 2020 election getting underway, we?re introducing a new show: one covering the country and its voters in the lead up to Nov. 3. In our first episode of ?The Field,? we ask Democratic caucusgoers how they?re feeling about the election. Traveling around the state, we found anxious Iowans asking one question over and over: Who can beat President Trump? Note: This episode contains strong language.

Guests: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times, and Austin Mitchell and Andy Mills, producers for ?The Daily.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Confused by the Iowa caucuses? Here?s how they work.The New York Times polled 584 Democrats likely to caucus in Iowa. Fifteen of them agreed to talk to us on camera. Here is what they told us.The state with a huge influence in picking presidential candidates doesn?t look much like the country as a whole, except in one very striking way: a rapidly aging population.
2020-02-03
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The Latest: No Witnesses

In a 51-to-49 vote, Republicans shut down an effort by Democrats to bring new witnesses and documents into the Senate impeachment trial. As they cleared a path toward acquittal, some Republicans stepped forward to explain why they voted as they did ? even though they believed what President Trump did was wrong.

?The Latest? is a series on the impeachment process, from the team behind ?The Daily.? You can find more information about it here.

2020-02-01
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The Lessons of 2016

The media?s coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign has come to be criticized for operating under three key assumptions: that Hillary Clinton was certain to be the Democratic nominee, that Donald Trump was unlikely to be the Republican nominee, and that once Clinton and Trump had become their party?s nominees, she would win.

With voting for 2020 set to begin in Iowa on Monday, ?The Daily? sat down with Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The New York Times, to discuss the lessons he ? and the organization ? learned from 2016. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

This is our guide to the 2020 election.We?ve sent reporters to every corner of the country and told them not to make any assumptions in this election cycle. Here are some of the most in-depth stories we?ve told in an effort to help the country understand itself.As part of a new approach to election coverage, The Times?s editorial board has re-examined how ? and why ? it makes presidential endorsements.
2020-01-31
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A Virus?s Journey Across China

Nearly two decades ago, China was at the heart of a public health crisis over a deadly new virus. It said it had made lifesaving reforms since. So why is the Wuhan coronavirus now spreading so rapidly across the world? Our correspondent went to the center of the outbreak to find out. Guest: Javier C. Hernández, a New York Times correspondent based in Beijing. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

What is the coronavirus? And why is China struggling to control its spread around the world?Unless you are at high risk for catching the disease, it may be a good idea to avoid buying a face mask. There is now a shortage of masks, leaving health care workers unprotected and expediting the spread of the disease.
2020-01-30
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The Latest: The ?Public Interest?

In the question-and-answer stage of the Senate impeachment trial, Alan Dershowitz, the celebrity lawyer on President Trump?s legal team, made an argument that stunned many who heard it. Say that Mr. Trump did extend a quid pro quo to Ukraine, and that he did it to improve his own re-election prospects. Says Mr. Dershowitz: What?s wrong with that?

?The Latest? is a new series on the impeachment inquiry, from the team behind ?The Daily.? You can find more information about it here.

2020-01-30
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Chuck Schumer on Impeachment, Witnesses and the Truth

Today, we sit down with Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, to discuss what it?s like to be the leader of a party out of power at this moment in the impeachment trial of President Trump. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

"Look, is it an uphill fight? Yes.? he said. ?Are we making progress? Yes.? Why Mr. Schumer believes he can persuade his Republican colleagues to allow new witnesses in the trial.Here are the latest updates on impeachment, including the Senate?s response to a Times investigation revealing new claims about the president?s conduct from his former national security adviser John Bolton.
2020-01-29
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What John Bolton Knows

A firsthand account by John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser, directly linked President Trump to a quid pro quo in the Ukraine affair, undercutting a central plank of the defense?s argument. What could that mean for the final phase of the impeachment trial? Guests: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House and Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

A Times investigation revealed that Mr. Bolton privately expressed concern to the attorney general last year that the president was effectively granting personal favors to autocratic leaders around the world.Republican senators had been ready to swiftly acquit President Trump. But Mr. Bolton?s revelations in the manuscript of his new book could change the calculus.
2020-01-28
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A Small Town?s Fight Over America?s Biggest Sport

Across the United States, parents and school districts have been wrestling with the question of whether the country?s most popular and profitable sport is too dangerous for children. Today, we explore how that dispute is playing out in one Texas town. Guests: Ken Belson, who covers the N.F.L. for The New York Times, spoke with Jim Harris and Spencer Taylor in Marshall, Texas. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Repeated blows to the head while playing football have been linked to a degenerative brain disease called C.T.E.Football is a powerful, cultural force in Marshall, a city of about 24,000 people in East Texas. But residents, coaches and educators have questioned the safety of a sport they cannot imagine living without.
2020-01-27
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The Swing Issue That Could Win a Swing State

Three Rust Belt swing states are critical to winning the presidency this year ? Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. In Pennsylvania, there is one issue that could be decisive: fracking natural gas.

Opposition to fracking could be fatal for a candidate in the state, yet front-runners for the Democratic nomination have committed to banning fracking nationwide if elected. We went to western Pennsylvania, where fracking affects residents daily, to see whether electability in the state could really be reduced to this single issue.

Guests: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times, traveled to Pennsylvania with Andy Mills and Monika Evstatieva, producers for ?The Daily.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Our investigative team revealed how immense amounts of methane, the primary gas acquired by fracking, are escaping from oil and gas sites nationwide, worsening global warming.What is fracking? And why is it so harmful to the communities that come in contact with the toxins it leaves behind?
2020-01-24
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Harry and Meghan. (And Why Their Saga Matters.)

In a moment of national insecurity, with the future of the United Kingdom seemingly hanging in the balance, a new royal couple offered the vision of a unified, progressive future. But the same forces that pushed for Britain to leave the European Union have now pushed Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, to leave the country.

Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

A wish to carve out more ?progressive? roles has led to the loss of perks, privileges and titles ? a more thorough break than the Duke and Duchess of Sussex seem to have expected.The couple?s push for greater independence has resurfaced the same questions that animated the Brexit debate.Black Britons expressed support for Harry and Meghan. ?Thank God they are free,? one Londoner said. ?All of this is about her race. I know it because as a Caribbean woman who did not grow up here, I have experienced it myself.?
2020-01-23
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The Latest: ?Let Us Begin?

Opening arguments in the Senate impeachment trial are underway. For House impeachment managers, that means an opportunity to formally make their case, uninterrupted, for three straight days. For President Trump?s lawyers and Republican allies, that means three straight days of sitting in the Senate chamber, bound by a vow of silence.

?The Latest? is a series on the impeachment process, from the team behind ?The Daily.? You can find more information about it here.

2020-01-23
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The Moderates? Impeachment Moment

After nearly 12 hours of vicious debate, the Senate voted early Wednesday to adopt the rules that will govern the rest of the impeachment trial. But in a Republican-controlled chamber, why weren?t they the rules that Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, had originally wanted?

Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, congressional editor for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading: 

Voting along party lines, Senate Republicans blocked Democrats? efforts to subpoena witnesses and documents related to President Trump?s dealings with Ukraine.As the trial began in earnest, Mr. Trump was 4,000 miles away, touting the United States? economic growth at the World Economic Forum, an elite gathering of business leaders in Davos, Switzerland.
2020-01-22
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Lessons From the Last Impeachment Trial

As President Trump?s impeachment trial resumes this afternoon, we look back two decades to a time when Google was in its infancy, Y2K was stoking anxiety and partisanship in Congress was not quite so entrenched. That year, 1999, was the last time the Senate considered whether a president had committed high crimes and misdemeanors. So what has changed since the Senate trial of President Bill Clinton, and why is this impeachment such a different story?

Guest: Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading: 

Four journalists at The Times tell their stories of covering the last impeachment trial.Senator Mitch McConnell, the Republican majority leader, announced rules to try to implement a speedy trial. Here?s how the framework differs from the Clinton precedent.
2020-01-21
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Bernie's Big Bet

The Obama coalition has become almost mythic within the Democratic Party for having united first-time voters, people of color and moderates to win the presidency in 2008. This year, Senator Bernie Sanders is betting that he can win with the support of young voters and people of color ? but without the moderates.

To do that, he?s counting on winning over and energizing the Latino vote. The ultimate test of whether he will be able to do that is in California, where Latinos are the single biggest nonwhite voting bloc. While young Latinos in California overwhelmingly support Mr. Sanders, to become the Democratic nominee, he will need the support of their parents and grandparents as well.

Guests: Jennifer Medina, a national political correspondent who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The New York Times, traveled to California with Jessica Cheung and Monika Evstatieva, producers on ?The Daily,? to speak with Latino voters. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading: 

Though Mr. Sanders is a 78-year-old white senator from Vermont, in California, some Latino supporters are calling him ?Tío Bernie,? as if he were an uncle or a family friend.Mr. Sanders and Senator Elizabeth Warren, the two leading progressive candidates, sparred publicly in the last debate.
2020-01-17
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The Impeachment Trial Begins

The impeachment trial of President Trump begins this morning. Today, we answer all of your questions about what will happen next ? including how it will work and what is likely to happen. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

The House?s long-anticipated vote to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate fell largely along party lines, setting the stage for what promises to be a fiercely partisan trial.Here?s a step-by-step guide to the process.
2020-01-16
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The Russian Hacking Plan for 2020

At the heart of President Trump?s impeachment is his request that Ukraine investigate how his political rival, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., could be connected to an energy company called Burisma. New reporting from The Times suggests that Russian hackers may be trying to fulfill that request ? and potentially hack into the 2020 election itself. Guests: Nicole Perlroth, who covers cybersecurity for The Times, spoke with Oren Falkowitz, a former analyst at the National Security Agency and co-founder of the cybersecurity company Area 1. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

The Times has evidence that the same Russian military hackers that stole emails from Hillary Clinton?s campaign in 2016 have been infiltrating Burisma, the energy company at the center of the Ukraine affair. Here?s what we know about the hackers.New details emerged on Tuesday of Mr. Trump?s pressure campaign on Ukraine, intensifying demands on Senate Republicans to include witness testimony and additional documents in the impeachment trial.
2020-01-15
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The Escape of Carlos Ghosn

Carlos Ghosn?s trial was poised to be one of the most closely watched in Japanese history ? a case involving claims of corporate greed, wounded national pride and a rigged legal system. Then the former Nissan chief pulled off an unimaginable escape. Guest: Ben Dooley, a business reporter for The New York Times based in Japan. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mr. Ghosn leaves behind a contentious history at one of the world?s largest car manufacturers, a record which is now unlikely to be scrutinized in Japanese courts. ?Nobody?s going to take it from me,? Mr. Ghosn said of his legacy.The tycoon?s escape preparations spanned the globe, revealing the means by which the well-connected can evade legal accountability.
2020-01-14
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Why Australia Is Burning

Wildfires are devastating Australia, incinerating an area roughly the size of West Virginia and killing 24 people and as many as half a billion animals. Today, we look at the human and environmental costs of the disaster, its connection to climate change and why so many Australians are frustrated by Prime Minister Scott Morrison?s response. 

Guest: Livia Albeck-Ripka, a reporter for The Times in Melbourne a reporter for The Times in Melbourne who spoke with Susan Pulis, a woman who fled the fires with kangaroos and koalas in her car. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading: 

After Australia?s hottest and driest year on record, Mr. Morrison has minimized the connection between the wildfire crisis and climate change and declined to make moves to curb the country?s carbon emissions.Many Australians entered the new year under apocalyptic blood-red skies as smoke from the fires choked the country?s southeastern coast. ?I look outside and it?s like the end of the world. Armageddon is here,? one woman in Canberra said.The fires have burned through dozens of towns, destroying at least 3,000 homes. Now, unbridled by continuous fire fighting, the blazes have returned to some scorched areas to level what is left. Rupert Murdoch controls the largest news company in Australia, and his newspapers have contributed to a wave of misinformation about the cause of the fires. 
2020-01-13
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The Case Against Harvey Weinstein, Part 2

Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence. 

Yesterday on ?The Daily,? we heard the story of Lucia Evans, whose allegation of sexual violence against Harvey Weinstein helped launch his criminal trial in New York. After Ms. Evans was dropped from the case, questions were raised about how a man accused of sexual misconduct by more than 80 women could end up facing so few of them in court. In the second half of this series, what happened next in the case against Harvey Weinstein. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of ?She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Mr. Weinstein built a network of complicity that dozens of women say kept them silent for years. Opening statements in the trial have yet to be made, as this week has focused on jury selection and clashes over the rules of decorum in court.
2020-01-10
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The Case Against Harvey Weinstein, Part 1

Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence. 

The story of Harvey Weinstein is a story of patterns. Scores of women ? more than 80 ? have given eerily similar accounts of abuse and harassment by the powerful movie mogul.

This week, two years after those allegations were first reported in The New York Times, Mr. Weinstein?s trial opens in New York. In the first part of a two-part series, we investigate why the case went from 80 potential plaintiffs to two.

Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of ?She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Mr. Weinstein?s reputation preceded him as he stepped into a Manhattan courthouse this week to face charges of rape and criminal sexual activity, making it difficult to find jurors who did not already have strong opinions about the case.The reporters who broke the first investigation into Mr. Weinstein explain why the trial rests on a narrow legal case with an already fraught back story and why the result is highly unpredictable.On the first day of Mr. Weinstein?s trial, two other criminal allegations against him were released in Los Angeles.
2020-01-09
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Pelosi?s Impeachment Gamble

John R. Bolton, the former White House national security adviser, has announced that he is willing to give evidence in the impeachment trial of President Trump. The question is: Will the Senate ? and the majority leader, Mitch McConnell ? let that happen? Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, the congressional editor of The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Mr. Bolton?s announcement was an unexpected turn that could alter the political dynamic of the impeachment process, raising the possibility of Republican defections.In response, Mr. McConnell said that he had the votes he needed to quickly acquit the president without calling witnesses or hearing new evidence.
2020-01-08
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Why Iran Is in Mourning

The killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, Iran?s most formidable military and intelligence leader, displayed the fault lines in a fractious region. From Iraq to Israel, many victims of the commander?s shadow warfare celebrated his death; but in Tehran, thousands filled the streets to grieve. Today, we explore who General Suleimani was, and what he meant to Iranians. 

Guest: Farnaz Fassihi, a reporter covering Iran for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

As we break down how religious differences have fueled conflict in Iraq and Iran, here?s a refresher on the distinction between Sunni and Shia Islam. At General Suleimani?s funeral, a senior military leader vowed to set America ?ablaze.? But it remains uncertain how, or even whether, Iran will strike back.President Trump and his defense secretary have said different things about how the United States might respond to any Iranian retaliation. One of our Interpreter columnists is struggling to see a deeper strategy.Dozens of American citizens of Iranian descent have been detained while trying to enter the United States. ?My kids shouldn?t experience such things,? one woman said after being held overnight upon return from a ski trip in Canada. ?They are U.S. citizens. This is not O.K.?
2020-01-07
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The Killing of General Qassim Suleimani

Iran has promised ?severe revenge? against the United States for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani. But what made the high-ranking military leader an American target in the first place? Guest: Helene Cooper, who covers the Pentagon for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani was known as the instigator behind proxy wars that fueled instability in the Middle East. His death further disturbed the region?s delicate power balances ? and effectively ended a landmark nuclear deal.Some Iranian officials called the American strike on General Suleimani an act of war. As the consequences of the killing ripple outward, our columnist asks: Was the strike a good idea?Catching up after a weekend offline? Here?s what else you need to know about the death of General Suleimani.
2020-01-06
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Boeing?s Broken Dreams

This week, ?The Daily? is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of 2019 and checking in on what has happened since they first appeared. Today, we return to our conversation with the whistle-blower John Barnett, known as Swampy, about what he said were systemic safety problems at Boeing. After two 737 Max jet crashes killed a total of 346 people and a federal investigation left the company in crisis, we ask: Is something deeper going wrong at the once-revered manufacturer? 

Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with John Barnett, a former quality manager at Boeing. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Boeing successfully lobbied to reduce government oversight of airplane designs, allowing them to regulate faulty engineering internally.A congressional investigation last fall asked what Boeing knew before the two crashes.
2020-01-03
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The President and the Publisher

This week, ?The Daily? is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of 2019 and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to the exclusive interview in the Oval Office between the publisher of The Times, A. G. Sulzberger, and President Trump about the role of a free press. Guest: A. G. Sulzberger, The Times?s publisher, who joined two White House reporters, Maggie Haberman and Peter Baker, to interview Mr. Trump. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

In his remarks on the media, Mr. Trump took credit for popularizing the term ?fake news,? but declined to accept responsibility for a rise in threats against journalists since he took office. Read excerpts from his exchange with Mr. Sulzberger.Here are five takeaways from the interview.Mr. Trump said he wanted evidence the world was getting more dangerous for journalists. Here it is.
2020-01-02
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Our Fear Facer Makes a New Friend

This week, ?The Daily? is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since they appeared. Today, we introduce Ella Maners, 9, from our kids? episode on facing fears, to Barbara Greenman, 70, who heard Ella?s story and felt compelled to reach out. Guests: Julia Longoria and Bianca Giaever, producers for ?The Daily?; Ella and her mother, Katie Maners; and Ms. Greenman, a listener who used Ella?s tips to confront her own fears. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Ella?s fears of sickness and tornadoes were taking over her life ? until she went to summer camp. How the University of Florida is helping children learn to deal with obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders.
2019-12-31
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Haunted by the Ghost of Michael Jackson

This week, ?The Daily? is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we talk to our critic about his reckoning with abuse allegations against Michael Jackson and his efforts to abstain from the pop star?s music. Ten months later, he shares why he still has a Shazam feed full of Jackson?s hits ? and reflects on what the ubiquity Jackson?s music in public reveals about our society. Guest: Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The Times and a host of the podcast ?Still Processing.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

This episode contains descriptions of abuse.

Background coverage:

Read Wesley Morris?s piece about confronting his own fandom in the face of the allegations made against Michael Jackson in ?Leaving Neverland,? an HBO documentary.We look at Jackson?s history of sexual abuse accusations, and answer some questions about why child abuse victims often take years to come forward.A musical about the pop star?s life is set to open in New York next summer. Because of Jackson?s fierce fan base, the show?s producers are confident tickets will sell.Listen to the hosts of ?Still Processing? discuss how to respond to a problematic artist whose influence has so thoroughly permeated modern culture.
2019-12-30
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'There's No Going Back'

This week, ?The Daily? is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today: the unexpected story of how family history websites have been used by law enforcement to track down suspects and win convictions ? and why retroactive regulation won?t be able to reverse the trend. Guest: Heather Murphy, a reporter at The New York Times who spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Today, we revisit Part 2 of our series on genetic privacy. If you?d like to catch up on the full story, make sure to listen to Part 1 as well.Do you think your DNA profile is private? A warrant granted by a judge in Florida could open up all consumer DNA sites for use by law enforcement agencies across the country.At a conference this fall, ?rockstars? of the DNA industry and top law enforcement officers grappled with how to regulate the use of genetic material in policing. They also practiced solving murders together.Here?s how to protect yourself if you take a genetic test at home.
2019-12-27
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Impeachment Through the Eyes of a Child

This week, ?The Daily? is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. After we sat down with Leo, a third grader, to talk about the impeachment inquiry, we were flooded with emails expressing gratitude for our guest. So we called Leo back and asked him about what he?s been up to while the impeachment inquiry has unfolded. Guests: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times; Bianca Giaever, a producer for ?The Daily?; and Leo, a third grader who was obsessed with the impeachment inquiry. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Leo predicted President Trump would be impeached in the House of Representatives. He was right.The impeachment process was paused after Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she would wait to see what the trial in the Senate would look like before sending the two charges there.
2019-12-26
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By Challenging Evangelicals, She Changed Them

This week, ?The Daily? is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to the story of Rachel Held Evans and speak to her husband, Daniel, as he heads into his first holiday season since her death.

In her absence, the community she created still engages with her work online. ?It tells me there?s a lot of pain in the world,? Mr. Evans said. ?I find hope that there are people not yet born who may still read her words.? Guests: Elizabeth Dias, who covers religion for The Times and Daniel Evans, Rachel Held Evans?s husband. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Rachel Held Evans, the best-selling author who challenged conservative Christianity and gave voice to a generation of wandering evangelicals wrestling with their faith, passed away in May after experiencing excessive brain swelling.
2019-12-24
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Year in Sound

Our first episode of 2019 opened the year with a question: ?What will Democrats do with their new power?? One of our last offered the answer: ?impeach the president.? This audio time capsule captures the weeks in between ? a crescendo of controversy and culture wars to wrap up the decade. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Here?s some nostalgia as we head into 2020:

Our photo editors pored over ten years of images to bring you: The decade in pictures.And if you?re looking for a longer read over the holidays, check out our editors? picks for the 10 best books of 2019.
2019-12-23
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The Candidates: Joe Biden

He built a career, and a presidential campaign, on a belief in bipartisanship. Now, critics of the candidate ask: Is political consensus a dangerous compromise? 

In Part 4 of our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, we examine the long Senate career, and legislative legacy, of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Mr. Biden now plays down his role overhauling crime laws with segregationist senators in the 1980s and ?90s. In an investigation, our reporter found that the portrayal is at odds with his actions and rhetoric back then.The former vice president and current Democratic front-runner wants to unite the country in a divisive time. Here?s more on what Mr. Biden stands for.This Supreme Court battle explains why Mr. Biden firmly believes in bipartisanship.
2019-12-20
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The Impeachment of President Donald J. Trump

The House of Representatives has impeached President Trump, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. We traveled to Michigan to understand how a fractious Democratic Party ultimately united around impeachment, having started the year divided over the issue. Guests: Representative Elissa Slotkin and Representative Rashida Tlaib, Democrats of Michigan. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Mr. Trump became only the third president in American history to be impeached, as the House charged him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The votes were largely along party lines.Moderate Democrats encouraged their party to begin the impeachment inquiry. Now, those representatives face a reckoning with that decision.Are you confused by the impeachment process? Here?s how it works.
2019-12-19
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The Latest: Impeachment Vote Update, 5:30 P.M. Eastern

The House is expected to vote tonight along party lines to impeach the president. But before that can take place, there must be speeches ? lots of them. These speeches are the last chance lawmakers have to get their words in the history books before they cast their ballots. Here?s what they had to say.

?The Latest? is a series on the impeachment process, from the team behind ?The Daily.? You can find more information about it here.

2019-12-18
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A Fight Over How to Fight Anti-Semitism

President Trump has issued an executive order cracking down on anti-Semitism. But some Jewish Americans fear that the plan could end up deepening prejudice instead of curbing it. Guest: Max Fisher, a Times international reporter and columnist for The Interpreter. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

The executive order touches on a defining issue of our time: Who belongs, and who decides?Some students across the United States said they were afraid that the order would backfire, worsening anti-Semitism on college campuses. 
2019-12-18
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The Latest: The Rules

House members are preparing for a vote on two articles of impeachment against President Trump, while their counterparts gear up for the next phase: a trial in the Senate. As the impeachment process moves from a Democratic-controlled chamber to one dominated by Republicans, the rules of engagement are changing ? and party leaders are battling over who gets to decide them.

?The Latest? is a series on the impeachment inquiry, from the team behind ?The Daily.? You can find more information about it here.

2019-12-18
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Switching Sides in Britain

To pull off its landslide victory in last week?s election, Prime Minister Boris Johnson?s Conservative Party flipped dozens of districts in the ?red wall? of British politics ? a gritty stronghold of coal and factory towns that had supported the Labour Party for decades. Our correspondent traveled across the United Kingdom to understand what the region?s political realignment may foretell about the future of the country. 

Guest: Patrick Kingsley, an international correspondent for The New York Times, who spoke with constituents in Shirebrook, England. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

?Votes for the pro-Brexit Conservatives had 10 times the effective power of votes for the anti-Brexit Liberal Democrats.? Our columnist writes that this is thanks to the electoral system used in Britain and the United States.On a road trip from London to Glasgow, our correspondent found a country longing for a past that may be impossible to revive.
2019-12-17
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A Secret History of the War in Afghanistan

For nearly two decades, U.S. government officials crafted a careful story of progress to justify their ongoing military campaign in Afghanistan. Newly disclosed documents reveal to what extent that story was not the reality of the war. Today, one former Marine speaks about the missteps the government concealed for years. Guest: Thomas Gibbons-Neff, a reporter in The New York Times Washington bureau and a former Marine infantryman and Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Afghans have endured four decades of conflict, with little prospect of peace. This is the story of the last 18 years since the American invasion, as told by the men and women who?ve lived it.?We were devoid of a fundamental understanding of Afghanistan ? we didn?t know what we were doing,? one retired three-star Army general said in hundreds of classified memos obtained by The Washington Post.Here are our key takeaways from the declassified documents. 
2019-12-16
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