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The Daily

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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Trump?s Re-election Rally

The president kicked off his re-election campaign on Tuesday with a rally in Orlando, Fla. We spoke with a colleague who was there. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

President Trump?s messaging at the rally signals a bet that his 2020 campaign will be a replay of 2016 ? but this time, with the full support of the Republican Party.Here are eight things our reporters learned from attending the rally.The 2020 election is shaping up as a test: Was Mr. Trump?s victory a historical fluke, or a genuine reflection of America today?
2019-06-19
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Hacking the Russian Power Grid

A New York Times investigation found that the United States is actively infiltrating Russia?s electric power grid. We look at what that means for the future of cyberwarfare. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of ?The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

The cyberattacks on Russia?s power grid are intended partly as a warning, and partly to be poised to act if a major conflict broke out between Washington and Moscow.In response to The Times?s report, the Kremlin warned that American attacks could escalate into cyberwar.
2019-06-18
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Why Hong Kong Is Still Protesting

In Hong Kong, hundreds of thousands remain in the streets, even after city officials said they would suspend the contentious extradition bill that prompted the demonstrations in the first place. We look at why the protesters still don?t trust their government. Guest: Austin Ramzy, who covers Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

If the shelving of the extradition bill and an apology from Hong Kong?s leader were aimed at mollifying the protesters, the measures seem to have had the opposite effect.The bill?s suspension is China?s biggest concession to public pressure in President Xi Jinping?s nearly seven years as leader of the country.Here are photographs of the protests, which are some of the largest in the history of Hong Kong.
2019-06-17
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Part 5: Can Liberal Democracy Survive in Europe?

Across Europe, populists are saying that it?s not democracy they aim to discard, but liberalism. To end our series, we returned to Germany, the country at the heart of a liberal Europe, to see if the rejection of liberalism had also taken hold there.

Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for ?The Daily,? went to an election party in Berlin for the far-right party Alternative for Germany. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Germany?s political establishment looks increasingly fragile after the European Parliament elections.As anti-Semitic crime rises in Germany, new forms of old hatreds are stoking fear for the nation?s estimated 200,000 Jews.Katrin Bennhold offers her main takeaway after 10 days on the road: ?Europe cannot be taken for granted. But neither can its demise.?
2019-06-14
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Part 4: Poland?s Culture Wars

In Poland, a nationalist party has been in power for four years. We went to Warsaw, the capital, and Gdansk, the birthplace of a movement that brought down Communism, to see how this government has changed democratic institutions.

Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for ?The Daily,? spoke with Jaroslaw Kurski, a newspaper editor; Magdalena Adamowicz, a politician and the widow of a liberal mayor who was murdered; and Danuta Bialooka-Kostenecka, an official with the governing Law and Justice party. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Poland?s nationalists aren?t seeking to take the country out of the European Union, but to take the European Union out of Poland.With national elections approaching, both the government and its opponents have sought to shape the country?s historical memory.Poland?s governing party has made opposition to gay rights a cornerstone of its campaigning, escalating fears that the divisive rhetoric could translate to violence.
2019-06-13
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Part 3: ?Italy First?

In Italy, hard-right populists have moved from the fringes to become part of the national government. Now, the country is on the front lines of a nationalist resurgence in Europe. To understand why, we spent a day with Susanna Ceccardi, a rising star of the far-right League party. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for ?The Daily,? hit the campaign trail with Ms. Ceccardi in Tuscany. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Ms. Ceccardi is among a group of nationalist politicians seeking to break the European Union from the inside.A victory for the anti-immigrant League party in the European Parliament elections gave Matteo Salvini, the party?s leader and Italy?s interior minister, the strongest claim to the leadership of Europe?s populists.
2019-06-12
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Part 2: The French Rebellion

President Emmanuel Macron of France had been viewed as the next leader of a liberal Europe. But when the Yellow Vest movement swept the country, protesters took to the streets, rejecting him as elitist and questioning the vision of Europe that he stood for. In Part 2 of our series, we traveled to a city in northern France to hear from some of these protesters. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for ?The Daily,? met with Yellow Vest demonstrators in Reims. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

For some followers of the Yellow Vest movement, Europe embodies everything they have come to hate: shuttered factories, stagnating wages and a young banker-turned-president in favor of deeper integration.In elections last month for the European Parliament, the far-right leader Marine Le Pen won in the rural, depressed and deindustrialized areas of northern, south-central and eastern France that gave rise to the Yellow Vest revolt.
2019-06-11
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Part 1: The Battle for Europe

The decades-long plan to stitch together countries and cultures into the European Union was ultimately blamed for two crises: mass migration and crippling debt. Together, those events contributed to a wave of nationalism across Europe. In a five-part series this week, we take a look at some of the movements aiming to disrupt the E.U. from within. Guest: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Before the European Parliament elections last month, Katrin Bennhold and producers of ?The Daily? set out on a 10-day trip to find out what Europe means to Europeans today.The results of the elections indicated that the struggle over the future direction of the European Union would only intensify.
2019-06-10
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A New Way to Solve a Murder, Part 2: The Future of Genetic Privacy

The police identified a suspect in a double murder after combing through DNA profiles on a website designed to connect family members. We look at what his trial will tell us about the future of genetic genealogy in solving crimes. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

The case of William Earl Talbott II, who is accused of killing a Canadian couple in Washington State 32 years ago, could result in legal precedents involving the use of genetic genealogy techniques by law enforcement.
2019-06-07
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A New Way to Solve a Murder, Part 1: The Genetic Detectives

A year after police used a genetic database to help identify a suspect in the Golden State Killer case, the same technique has been used to arrest dozens of people. Now, for the first time, one of those cases is headed to trial. In Part 1 of a two-part series, we look at the tool that is transforming law enforcement and testing the limits of privacy. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch; Peter Headley, a detective with the San Bernardino County Sheriff?s Department; and Barbara Rae-Venter, a genetic genealogist. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Using a technique that relies on DNA submitted to online genealogy sites, investigators have solved dozens of violent crimes. But some question the ethics and legality of the technique.GEDMatch, a free site that began as a side project, has upended how investigators across the country are approaching cold cases.Read about how genetic sleuthing through GEDMatch helped a woman who had been kidnapped as a child recover her identity.
2019-06-06
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This Drug Could End H.I.V. Why Hasn?t It?

Dr. Robert Grant developed a treatment ? a daily pill known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP ? that could stop the AIDS crisis. We look at why that hasn?t happened. Guests: Dr. Grant, who has been working on H.I.V. treatment and prevention for over 30 years, and Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Gilead Sciences, the maker of Truvada, the only drug approved to prevent H.I.V. infection, will donate enough of the drug to supply 200,000 patients, but critics questioned the company?s motives.The high cost of drugs remains a major obstacle to ending the AIDS epidemic.Here?s more information about PrEP from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.
2019-06-05
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How a Secret U.S. Cyberweapon Backfired

A criminal group has held computer systems for the city of Baltimore hostage for nearly a month ? paralyzing everything from email to the real estate market to the payment of water bills. But what residents don?t know is that a major component of the malware used to shut down the system was developed nearby by a federal government agency. Guest: Scott Shane, who covers national security and the U.S. intelligence community for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

People involved in the investigation say the N.S.A. tool, EternalBlue, was found in Baltimore?s network by four contractors hired to restore computer services. The N.S.A. says that?s not the case. Cybercriminals have been targeting other vulnerable American towns and cities, from Pennsylvania to Texas, in ways that could disrupt local governments for months.
2019-06-04
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The Legacy of Rachel Held Evans

In a brief but prolific career, a young writer asked whether evangelical Christianity could change. In doing so, she changed it. Guests: Elizabeth Dias, who covers religion for The Times, in conversation with Natalie Kitroeff.  For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Read the Times obituary for Rachel Held Evans, the best-selling author who challenged conservative Christianity and gave voice to a generation of wandering evangelicals wrestling with their faith.
2019-06-03
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Death, Profit and Disclosure at a Children?s Hospital

A Times investigation found that doctors at UNC Children?s Hospital suspected that children with complex heart conditions had been dying at higher-than-expected rates, and even children with low-risk conditions seemed to do poorly. Secret recordings shared with our colleague reveal what was happening inside the hospital. Guest: Ellen Gabler, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Limited information released by UNC shows that the hospital?s cardiac surgery mortality rate from July 2013 through June 2017 was higher than those of most of the 82 hospitals that publicly report similar information.Listen to the audio recordings that provide an unfiltered look behind closed doors at the hospital.
2019-05-31
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Robert Mueller Breaks His Silence

Robert Mueller, the special counsel, discussed his investigation of Russian election interference for the first time on Wednesday. He did not absolve President Trump of obstruction of justice, saying: ?If we had enough confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so.? Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

The news conference presented an extraordinary spectacle of a top law enforcement official publicly stating that the president?s conduct warranted a criminal investigation, even though it was impossible to indict him for any crimes.Here?s the full transcript of Mr. Mueller?s statement.
2019-05-30
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The White House Plan to Change Climate Science

From Day 1, the Trump administration has tried to dismantle regulations aimed at curbing climate change. Now officials are attempting to undermine the very science on which such policies rest. Guest: Coral Davenport, who covers energy and environmental policy for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Parts of the federal government will no longer fulfill what scientists say is one of the most urgent jobs of climate science studies: reporting on the future effects of a rapidly warming planet. Here is a breakdown of the 1,656-page report released last fall that warns of a damaged environment and shrinking economy.
2019-05-29
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What Actually Happened to New York?s Taxi Drivers

In the past year, many New York City taxi drivers have fallen deeper into debt, even as the city moved to rein in ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft. Our colleague explains how the rush to blame those apps shielded those who were really behind the crisis. Guests: Brian M. Rosenthal, an investigative reporter on the Metro desk of The New York Times, and Nicolae Hent, a taxi driver in New York City.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

A spate of suicides by taxi drivers in New York City over the past year has highlighted in brutal terms the financial plight of those with ownership permits. Officials blamed the crisis on competition from ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft.But thousands of immigrants who were chasing the dream of owning a New York taxi were trapped in reckless loans by bankers who made huge profits, The Times found. Despite years of warning signs, government agencies did little to stop it.
2019-05-28
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Confronting a Childhood Abuser

Three months ago, a recording of Sterling Van Wagenen, a founder of the Sundance Film Festival, appeared on an obscure website for whistle-blowers in the Mormon Church. The ?Daily? producer Annie Brown spoke with our colleague about the story that recording told. Guest: Elizabeth Harris, a culture reporter for The New York Times, talked to Sean Escobar, who made the recording of Mr. Van Wagenen.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode contains descriptions of abuse.

Background reading:

Read about how Mr. Escobar?s actions led to the arrest of Mr. Van Wagenen.Mr. Van Wagenen is expected to go to prison for at least six years after pleading guilty to child sexual abuse.
2019-05-24
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The Bank That Kept Saying Yes to Trump

At a time when most Wall Street firms had stopped doing business with Donald J. Trump, a single bank lent him more than $2 billion. We look at the two-decade relationship that could unlock the president?s financial secrets. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with David Enrich, the finance editor and author of the forthcoming book ?Dark Towers: The Inside Story of the World?s Most Destructive Bank.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

A real estate mogul made toxic by polarizing rhetoric and a pattern of defaults. A bank with longstanding financial problems and a record of misconduct. Read about President Trump?s tumultuous history with Deutsche Bank.A federal judge on Wednesday ruled against a request from the president to block Deutsche Bank from complying with congressional subpoenas.
2019-05-23
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A Growing Call for Impeachment

In the weeks since the release of the Mueller report, the Democratic Party has been struggling with how to proceed. Now, divisions are emerging as a group of House members push their leaders to open impeachment proceedings. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Some liberal Democrats called for an impeachment inquiry of President Trump after the former White House counsel, Donald F. McGahn II, under the direction of the president, skipped a scheduled House Judiciary Committee hearing.
2019-05-22
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The Rise of Modi: India?s Rightward Turn

India?s prime minister, Narendra Modi, has governed as a right-wing populist whose nationalist message has often pitted Hindus against Muslims. We look at what Mr. Modi?s likely re-election this week tells us about the country?s political future. Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Mr. Modi?s Hindu nationalist politics and his efforts to project a strong image of India abroad appeared to have played well among the country?s 900 million registered voters, according to exit polls.The results of the election may reveal not just a decision on Mr. Modi but also a deeper one on what kind of government India really wants.
2019-05-21
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The Legal Vulnerability of Roe v. Wade

From the day Roe v. Wade was decided, some have seen the constitutional right to an abortion as an inferred right rather than a guaranteed one. That distinction has become a threat to the law?s survival. Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, spoke with Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Because the court led by Chief Justice John Roberts tends toward incrementalism, it is more likely to hear cases that chip away at abortion rights than to overturn Roe v. Wade directly.But after nearly five decades, the anti-abortion movement is closer than it has ever been to dismantling Roe.
2019-05-20
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A Direct Challenge to Roe v. Wade in Alabama

Alabama has adopted a law that would criminalize nearly all abortions and make the penalty for providing one up to 99 years in prison. The man who wrote the law knew it was unconstitutional ? and did it anyway. We asked him why. Guests: Eric Johnston, a lawyer in Alabama who has spent more than 30 years trying to ban abortion, and Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

States across the country are passing some of the most restrictive abortion legislation in decades, setting up court battles that could profoundly reshape abortion access in America.On Wednesday, Alabama?s governor signed into law a measure to ban most abortions in the state. Here?s what?s likely to happen next.Among residents of Alabama, opposition to abortion is widespread.
2019-05-17
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Caught in the Middle of the Trade War

Yesterday, we told the story of President Trump?s trade war with China. Today, our colleague speaks with two Americans who have been feeling the effects of that war. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, talked to Kevin Watje, a truck manufacturer in Iowa, and Eldon Gould, a farmer in Illinois. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

President Trump?s tariffs, initially seen as a cudgel to break down trade barriers, increasingly look like more permanent measures intended to shelter American industry.Some Republicans are balking at the president?s trade policy as the Trump administration considers another bailout for farmers.
2019-05-16
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The President Takes On China, Alone

Years of multinational efforts have failed to get China to play by the international rules of trade. Now, President Trump has launched an all-out trade war in which the United States is confronting China on its own. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Peter S. Goodman, an economics correspondent. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

The intensifying trade war between the United States and China, the two largest economies on earth, has become the biggest threat to the global economy.Both countries seem to be hardening their positions in ways that will be difficult to resolve with the mutual face-saving that typically facilitates trade deals.
2019-05-15
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The Freshman: Rashida Tlaib, Part 2

When we last spoke with Representative Rashida Tlaib, she had just been sworn in ? and had fulfilled the fears of Democratic leaders by calling for the impeachment of President Trump. In the months since, she?s been challenging her party on a different front, attracting controversy for her criticisms of Israel, which some have characterized as anti-Semitic.

Ms. Tlaib has repeatedly denied that there?s any anti-Semitism behind what she?s said. But she hasn?t spoken at length about the controversy or explained where she?s coming from. So a few weeks ago, we traveled back to visit her at her congressional office in Detroit.

Guests: Representative Rashida Tlaib, Democrat of Michigan; and Andy Mills and Jessica Cheung, producers for ?The Daily.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode contains explicit language.

Background reading:

Remarks by Ms. Tlaib about the Palestinian role in the founding of Israel further inflamed a feud over the Jewish state, anti-Semitism and the first two Muslim women in the House.This episode of ?The Daily? includes excerpts from an interview with Ms. Tlaib on ?Skullduggery,? a podcast from Yahoo News. Listen to the full interview here.
2019-05-14
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John Bolton?s Plan for Iran

Iran is warning that it may resume production on its nuclear program, reviving a crisis that had been contained by the signing of the Iran nuclear deal four years ago. One man within the United States government may have intentionally brought us to this point. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

After President Hassan Rouhani of Iran declared that he would begin to walk away from the terms of the nuclear deal, the Trump administration responded with a new round of sanctions.The lack of ideological coherence in President Trump?s approach to foreign intervention has played to the advantage of more hawkish advisers.
2019-05-13
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A Founder of Facebook Says It?s Time to Break It Up

Chris Hughes, a Facebook co-founder and Mark Zuckerberg?s college roommate, has written an Op-Ed in The New York Times saying that Mr. Zuckerberg has become too powerful and that Facebook should be broken up. Our colleague sits down with him to talk about why he?s speaking out. Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology writer for The Times who interviewed Mr. Hughes. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

?It?s been 15 years since I co-founded Facebook at Harvard, and I haven?t worked at the company in a decade,? Mr. Hughes writes in his Op-Ed. ?But I feel a sense of anger and responsibility.?
2019-05-10
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Holding the Attorney General in Contempt

The House Judiciary Committee voted to recommend holding Attorney General William Barr in contempt after President Trump asserted executive privilege over the full Mueller report. But little is likely to happen as a result. We look at why Congress is running out of options for investigating the president. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

The House Judiciary Committee voted 24 to 16 to hold the attorney general in contempt after President Trump asserted executive privilege to shield the unredacted Mueller report from Congress.The president?s stonewalling of Congress may threaten to upend the separation of powers outlined in the Constitution.
2019-05-09
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$1 Billion in Losses: A Decade of Trump?s Taxes

In October, The New York Times published an investigation into the tax returns of President Trump?s father, revealing the president?s past involvement in tax evasion and stark inconsistencies in his account of his success. Two reporters who broke that story are back with new information about the president?s own taxes. Guests: Russ Buettner and Susanne Craig, investigative reporters for The Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

The Times has obtained figures from President Trump?s federal income tax returns from 1985 through 1994. They paint a far bleaker picture of his financial condition than was previously known.Here are five takeaways of what the numbers show.Listen to an episode of ?The Daily? about Mr. Trump?s participation in dubious tax schemes during the 1990s.
2019-05-08
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The Chinese Surveillance State, Part 2

In Part 2 of our series, we tell the story of an American citizen whose family members have been detained in Chinese re-education camps for Uighurs and members of other Muslim minority groups. We look at what his efforts to free them reveal about the global reach of China?s surveillance. Guest: Paul Mozur, a technology reporter for The New York Times based in Shanghai, spoke with Ferkat Jawdat, a Uighur and American citizen who lives in Virginia. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Ethnic Uighurs and other Muslim minorities have been sent to camps in vast numbers in what is China?s most sweeping internment operation since the Mao era.Chinese officers have attempted to suppress opposition from Uighurs abroad by detaining their relatives.The Trump administration has avoided addressing the persecution of the Uighurs during trade talks with China, fearing such a move could jeopardize a deal.
2019-05-07
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The Chinese Surveillance State, Part 1

Under President Xi Jinping, China is pioneering a new form of governance by surveillance. In the first of a two-part series, we look at how China tested that system by targeting one minority group. Guest: Paul Mozur, a technology reporter for The New York Times based in Shanghai. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Chinese authorities are expanding an extensive surveillance net by using a vast, secret system of facial recognition technology to control the Uighurs, a largely Muslim minority.Technology built for China?s surveillance system is now being applied ? and sometimes abused ? by other governments.
2019-05-06
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A Secret Dossier in Venezuela

After mass protests and international pressure failed to unseat President Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela, it became clear that it would take defections from within his own government to remove him from power. Now, secret documents suggest that some of Mr. Maduro?s people are starting to turn on him. Guest: Nicholas Casey, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

A secret dossier compiled by Venezuela?s intelligence agency and provided to The New York Times shows how Tareck El Aissami, a confidant of Mr. Maduro, became a wealthy man even as his country headed toward economic collapse. Listen to a series from ?The Daily? about Leopoldo López, a prominent opposition politician who was put under house arrest after staging protests in 2014.
2019-05-03
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The Senate Testimony of William Barr

In testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Attorney General William Barr defended his handling of the Mueller report, saying he did not misrepresent its findings. We spoke with our colleague who spent the day in the hearing room. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

At a contentious hearing marked by a deep partisan divide, the center of the clash was nothing less than the presidency and the integrity of the law enforcement system.Here are the highlights of Mr. Barr?s testimony on Wednesday.
2019-05-02
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A Dictator?s Fall in Sudan

After a brutal 30-year reign, President Omar Hassan al-Bashir of Sudan has been deposed by his own generals. The story of one of those generals and his son could signal what comes next for the country. Guest: Declan Walsh, the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times, spoke with Lt. Gen. Salah Abdelkhalig and Abdelkhalig Salah in Khartoum, Sudan. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

When Sudan?s Air Force chief stepped out to address a crowd calling for the ouster of the president, the chief?s own son was among the protesters ? a family split that mirrors broader tensions between the military and civilians.Mr. al-Bashir, who is under indictment by the International Criminal Court for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, was unseated amid sweeping demonstrations that began in December over the price of bread.
2019-05-01
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A Crisis at the N.R.A.

A bitter power struggle has broken out inside the nation?s pre-eminent gun rights group. We look at how the mere threat of a financial investigation plunged the National Rifle Association into crisis. Guest: Danny Hakim, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, spoke with us from the N.R.A.?s annual convention in Indianapolis. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Wayne LaPierre was unanimously re-elected as chief executive of the N.R.A. after infighting with Oliver L. North, who was replaced as the group?s president.The N.R.A. is facing a number of challenges, including the New York attorney general?s investigation into the group?s tax-exempt status and the new financial strength of the gun control movement.
2019-04-30
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Why the Supreme Court Is Ruling on the Census

Before the 2020 census begins in the United States, a case has been fast-tracked to the nation?s highest court about who is counted and why. It has become the biggest case in front of the Supreme Court this session. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

The Supreme Court?s conservative majority appeared ready to allow the Trump administration to add a question about citizenship status to the 2020 census. A decision is expected in June. Political maps based only on the citizen population could tilt in favor of Republicans.
2019-04-29
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How the Measles Outbreak Started

The number of measles cases in the United States has risen to nearly 700 ? the highest annual number recorded since 2000, when the disease was declared eliminated in the country. Many of those cases can be traced to ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities in New York. Guest: Sarah Maslin Nir, who covers New York City for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Officials in New York have taken extraordinary measures to fight the measles outbreak, including $1,000 fines and bans on unvaccinated children in public.The outbreak has Orthodox Jewish communities fearing a rise in anti-Semitism.How is measles transmitted? How safe is the vaccine? Here are answers to some questions about the disease.
2019-04-26
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A Secret in the Navy SEALs

Navy SEAL commandos said they had seen their decorated platoon leader, Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, commit war crimes. They were warned not to report it. They did so anyway. Guest: Dave Philipps, who covers the military for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

A confidential Navy criminal investigation report obtained by The Times paints a disturbing picture of a subculture within the SEALs that prized aggression and protected wrongdoers.
2019-04-25
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The Terrorist Attacks in Sri Lanka

A series of highly coordinated bombings in Sri Lanka has left more than 350 people dead. How did a small, obscure and underfinanced local group carry out one of the deadliest terrorist attacks since 9/11? Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the bombings, but the extent of its involvement is not yet clear.Here?s what we currently know and don?t know about the attacks.
2019-04-24
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The Whistle-Blowers at Boeing

After two crashes of Boeing 737 Max jets, regulators and lawmakers began asking whether competitive pressure may have led the company to miss safety risks, like an anti-stall system that played a role in both crashes. In reporting that story, our colleagues began to look into whether the problems extended beyond the 737 Max. Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with John Barnett, a former quality manager at Boeing. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

In an industry where safety is paramount, concerns involving two crucial Boeing plane models ? the 737 Max and the 787 Dreamliner ? point to potentially systemic problems at the company.
2019-04-23
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How Trump?s Protector Became Mueller?s Best Witness

The most interesting figure in the Mueller report may be the man who was hired to protect President Trump, but turned out to be the most damaging witness against him. We look at the role of Donald F. McGahn II, the former White House counsel. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Mr. McGahn?s interviews ? including an account of being asked by President Trump to remove the special counsel ?  were cited in the Mueller report 157 times, more than any other witness.Mr. McGahn is one of many Trump aides who took notes of their interactions with the president. In some cases, it was to help them do their jobs, but in others it was for self-preservation.
2019-04-22
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The Mueller Report Is Released

Two years and 448 pages later, a redacted version of the Mueller report has been made public. Here?s what we?ve learned. Guests: Michael S. Schmidt and Mark Mazzetti, who have been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

This episode includes disturbing language.

Background reading:

The Mueller report laid out the scope of Russian election interference and President Trump?s frantic efforts to thwart the special counsel investigation.Read a rundown of what we know so far from the report.Times reporters shared key annotated excerpts from the report.
2019-04-19
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The Abortion Wars, Part 2: The Illinois Option

Four states have passed laws this year that effectively ban abortion after six weeks of pregnancy, and others, including Missouri, are expected to follow suit. Some Missourians are crossing the state line to Illinois, where abortion access is protected. We spent a day at a clinic in Illinois with three women who were getting abortions. Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, and Lynsea Garrison, a producer for ?The Daily.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

This episode includes disturbing language.

Background coverage:

Bans on abortion in the very early weeks of pregnancy ? after a fetal heartbeat is detected ? used to be rare. But in the past three months, four states have passed so-called heartbeat bills, and 11 others are considering them. In 1973, the Supreme Court ruled ? with little controversy ? that women had a constitutional right to abortion. How did the decision give way to today?s deep political divide? Listen to a series from ?The Daily? on Roe v. Wade.
2019-04-18
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The Abortion Wars, Part 1: The Last Clinic in Missouri

When Justice Brett Kavanaugh?s ascendance to the Supreme Court threw the future of abortion rights into question, states scrambled to enact new laws. Two neighboring states in the Midwest are moving in opposite directions: Missouri is taking action to end abortion access, while Illinois is trying to preserve it. In a two-part series, we explore what those changes look like on the ground.

Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, and Lynsea Garrison, a producer for ?The Daily.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background coverage:

Anti-abortion activists are pursuing what they see as their best chance in years to restrict abortion access with a Supreme Court they believe to be in their favor.Listen to ?Roe v. Wade,? a series from ?The Daily? about how abortion became one of the most divisive political issues in the United States.
2019-04-17
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The Rise and Fall of Carlos Ghosn

Carlos Ghosn, the former head of Nissan, was the rare foreign executive to reach rock-star status in Japan by breaking the rules of its culture. Now, he?s accused of financial wrongdoing at the company he helped save. Guest: Motoko Rich, the Tokyo bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

Mr. Ghosn has been arrested on charges of financial misconduct at Nissan. He said in a video statement that the accusations were part of a plot by company executives to engineer his downfall.Mr. Ghosn wasn?t expected to succeed in Japan, a nation known for its distrust of outsiders. But he also wasn?t expected to fail like this.
2019-04-16
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The Moral Complexities of Working With Julian Assange

Many have considered Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, to be a hero of the free speech movement and a partner to journalists. He also came to be seen as a threat to national security. Then, he helped Russia interfere in a United States election. And now, he has been arrested. Our colleague tells us about the moral complexities of working with Mr. Assange. Guest: Scott Shane, who covers national security for The New York Times, has been following Mr. Assange?s decade-long saga. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

2019-04-15
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Israel?s Election, Through the Eyes of a Young Palestinian

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel has promised to assert sovereignty over dozens of Jewish settlements on the West Bank. For Palestinians there, that could mean the end of a decades-long struggle for a state of their own. We hear the perspective of one young man living on the West Bank. Guest: Fadi Quran, who grew up in a Palestinian community near an Israeli settlement. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

2019-04-12
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Netanyahu Won. The Two-State Solution Lost.

President Trump has promised to broker the deal of the century between Israelis and Palestinians. His partnership with Israel?s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, may have made such a peace deal all but impossible. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

2019-04-11
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When the Lights Went Out in Venezuela

Economic collapse, crumbling infrastructure, a contested presidential election result ? Venezuela was already in crisis. Then the power went out. Guest: Nicholas Casey, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times, who recently returned from Venezuela. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

2019-04-10
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En liten tjänst av I'm With Friends. Finns även på engelska.
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