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The Daily

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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Biden?s Executive Orders

Within hours of assuming the presidency, President Biden signed a flurry of executive orders. He rejoined the Paris climate agreement, repealed the so-called Muslim travel ban and mandated the wearing of masks on federal property.

The actions had a theme: They either reversed former President Donald Trump?s actions or rebuked his general policy approach.

But governing by decree has a downside. We look at the potential positives of the orders and point out the pitfalls.

Guest: Michael D. Shear, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Mr. Biden?s actions on Day 1 included orders on immigration, criminal justice and the climate.Here are the president?s 17 executive orders and other directives in detail.The U.S. has some catching up to do on the Paris climate agreement. Here?s an explainer on the history of the accord.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-22
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The Inauguration of Joe Biden

Unity was the byword of President Biden?s Inaugural Address.

The speech was an attempt to turn the page. But can this be achieved without, as many in the Democratic coalition believe, a full reckoning with and accountability of how America got to this point of division?

Today, we explore the defining messages of the president?s inaugural address. 

Guests: Astead W. Herndon, a national political reporter for The New York Times; Emily Cochrane, a congressional reporter for The Times.  

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

President Biden spoke of a return to the ordinary discord of democracy, with a reminder that ?politics doesn?t have to be a raging fire, destroying everything in its path.? You can read the full annotated speech here.For many in an exhausted, divided nation, the inauguration was a sea change, not just a transition.At the made-for-TV swearing-in, rituals of normalcy ran into reminders that these are anything but normal times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-21
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?Restoring the First Brick of Dignity?: Biden Supporters on His Inauguration

Joe Biden will be sworn in as the 46th president of the United States today. Among Democrats, there is a sense of joy and hope, but also of caution and concern.

We speak with a range of Mr. Biden?s supporters, including activists who had originally hoped for a more progressive ticket and longtime fans who embrace his moderation.

Guests:

Jennifer Medina, a national politics reporter for The New York Times.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Urging unity, Mr. Biden has tried to focus on his policy plans. But many of those who elected him are still fixated on his predecessor.Mr. Biden?s long career in public office spanned eight presidents. Now, at 78, he will join their ranks.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-20
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'What Kind of Message Is That?': How Republicans See the Attack on the Capitol

Polling in the days since the storming of the Capitol paints a complex picture. While most Americans do not support the riot, a majority of Republicans do not believe that President Trump bears responsibility. And over 70 percent of them say they believe that there was widespread fraud in the election.

Before President-elect Joe Biden?s inauguration, we called Trump supporters to hear their views about what happened at the Capitol and to gauge the level of dissatisfaction the new president will inherit.

Guest:

Jennifer Medina, a national politics reporter for The New York Times.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

A Pennsylvania woman accused of taking Speaker Nancy Pelosi?s laptop during the attack on the Capitol turned herself in to the police.Mr. Trump has prepared a wave of pardons for his final hours in office. Among those under consideration: the former New York Assembly speaker Sheldon Silver and the rapper Lil Wayne.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-19
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The Sunday Read: 'The Valve Turners'

Most Americans treat climate change seriously but not literally ? they accept the science, worry about forecasts but tell themselves that someone else will get serious about fixing the problem very soon.

The Valve Turners, on the other hand, take climate change both very seriously and very literally.

In the fall of 2016, the group of five environmental activists ? all in their 50s and 60s, most with children and one with grandchildren ? closed off five cross-border crude oil pipelines, including the Keystone.

On today?s Sunday Read, who are the Valve Turners and what are their motivations?

This story was written by Michelle Nijhuis and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-01-17
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?Rankly Unfit?: The View From a Republican Who Voted to Impeach

This episode contains strong language. 

Three days after being sworn into Congress, Representative Peter Meijer, Republican of Michigan, was sitting in the gallery of the House of Representatives as pro-Trump rioters stormed the Capitol.

After the siege, Mr. Meijer made his feelings clear: President Trump?s actions proved that he was ?rankly unfit.? A week later, he became one of just a handful of Republicans to vote for impeachment.

We talk with Mr. Meijer about his decision, his party and his ambitions.

Guest: Representative Peter Meijer, a first-term Republican congressman from Michigan.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Meet the first-term Republican representatives who are emerging as some of their party?s sharpest critics.Many Republican leaders and strategists want to prepare the party for a post-Trump future. But the pro-Trump voter base has other ideas.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-15
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Impeached, Again

?A clear and present danger.? Those were the words used by Nancy Pelosi to describe President Trump, and the main thrust of the Democrats? arguments for impeachment on the House floor.

While most House Republicans lined up against the move, this impeachment, unlike the last, saw a handful vote in favor.

Today, we walk through the events of Wednesday, and the shifting arguments that led up to the history-making second impeachment.

Guest: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

President Trump has become the first president to be impeached twice, after the House approved a single chargea single charge of inciting the mob that stormed the Capitol. He faces a Senate trial that could disqualify him from future office.Senator Mitch McConnell is said to have privately backed the impeachment of Mr. Trump.The second impeachment ? in a Capitol ringed by troops ? seemed like the almost inevitable culmination of four years that left the nation fractured, angry and losing its sense of self.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-14
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Is More Violence Coming?

After the attack on the Capitol, social media platforms sprang into action, deleting the accounts of agitators.

Without a central place to congregate, groups have splintered off into other, darker corners of the internet. That could complicate the efforts of law enforcement to track their plans.

We ask whether the crackdown on social media has reduced the risk of violence ? or just made it harder to prevent.

Guest: Sheera Frenkel, a cybersecurity reporter for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

In the days since rioters stormed Capitol Hill, fringe groups like armed militias, QAnon conspiracy theorists and far-right supporters of President Trump have vowed to continue their fight in hundreds of conversations on a range of internet platforms.Amazon, Apple and Google have cut off Parler, all but killing the service just as many conservatives were seeking alternatives to Facebook and Twitter.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-13
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A Swift Impeachment Plan

At the heart of the move to impeach President Trump is a relatively simple accusation: that he incited a violent insurrection against the government of the United States.

We look at the efforts to punish the president for the attack on the Capitol and explain what the impeachment process might look like.

Guest: Nicholas Fandos, a national reporter for The New York Times.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the House would formally call on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to strip President Trump of power and move to impeach the president if Mr. Pence refused.Here?s a closer look at what the president said at a rally of his supporters, which is a focus of the impeachment case.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-12
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A Pandemic Update: The Variant and the Vaccine Rollout

As 2020 drew to a close, a concerning development in the pandemic came out of Britain ? a new variant of the coronavirus had been discovered that is significantly more transmissible. It has since been discovered in a number of countries, including the United States.

The emergence of the new variant has added a new level of urgency to the rollout of vaccines in the U.S., a process that has been slow so far.

Today, an exploration of two key issues in the fight against the pandemic.

Guests: Carl Zimmer, a science writer and author of the ?Matter? column for The New York Times; Abby Goodnough, a national health care correspondent for The Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

The new variant of the coronavirus, discovered in December, appears to be more contagious than, and genetically distinct from, more established variants. Here is what we know about it.The first case of the variant in the U.S. was found in Colorado in December. Pfizer has said that its vaccine works against the key mutation.The distribution of the vaccine in the U.S. is taking longer than expected ? holiday staffing and saving doses for nursing homes are contributing to delays. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-11
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The Sunday Read: 'A Mother and Daughter at the End'

Without many predators or any prey, rhinos flourished for millions of years. Humans put an end to that, as we hunted them down and destroyed their habitat.

No rhino, however, is doing worse than the northern white. Just two, Najin and Fatu, both females, remain.

In his narrated story, Sam Anderson, a staff writer at The Times Magazine, visits the pair at the Ol Pejeta conservancy in Kenya, speaks to the men who devote their days to caring for them and explores what we will lose when Najin and Fatu die.

This story was written by Sam Anderson and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-01-10
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How They Stormed Congress

This episode contains strong language.

The pro-Trump mob that stormed the Capitol on Wednesday made their plans in plain sight. They organized on social media platforms and spoke openly of their intentions to occupy the Capitol.

But leaders in Washington opted for a modest law enforcement presence. In the aftermath, those security preparations are attracting intense scrutiny.

Today, we explore how the events of Jan. 6 could have happened.


Guest: Sheera Frenkel, who covers cybersecurity for The New York Times; Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a homeland security correspondent for The Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Inside Trump supporters? online echo chambers, the chaos of Jan. 6 could be seen coming.Failures by the police have spurred resignations and complaints of double standards.During the storming of the Capitol, social media sites were used by the mob to share information, including directions on which streets to take to avoid the police and which tools to bring to help pry open doors.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2021-01-08
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An Assault on the Capitol

This episode contains strong language.

It was always going to be a tense day in Washington. In the baseless campaign to challenge Joe Biden?s victory, Wednesday had been framed by President Trump and his allies as the moment for a final stand.

But what unfolded was disturbing: A mob, urged on by the president, advanced on the Capitol building as Congress was certifying the election results and eventually breached its walls.

Today, the story of what happened from Times journalists who were inside the Capitol.


Guests: Nicholas Fandos, a national reporter for The New York Times; Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The Times; and Emily Cochrane, a congressional reporter for The Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Journalists from The Times witnessed the violence and mayhem. Here?s how it unfolded.One of the most disturbing aspects of Wednesday?s events was that they could be seen coming. The president himself had all but circled the date.Here is an explanation of how the pro-Trump mob managed to storm the Capitol


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2021-01-07
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A Historic Night in Georgia

The long fight for control of the U.S. Senate is drawing to a close in Georgia, and the Democrats appear set to win out ? the Rev. Raphael Warnock is the projected winner of his race against Senator Kelly Loeffler, while Jon Ossoff is heavily favored to beat the other incumbent Republican, Senator David Perdue.

Today, we look at the results so far from these history-making Senate races and at what they mean for the future and fortunes of the two main parties.


Guest: Nate Cohn, a domestic correspondent for The Upshot at The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

A Baptist preacher born and raised in Georgia, Raphael Warnock has defeated Kelly Loeffler to become his state?s first Black senator, breaking a barrier with distinct meaning in American politics.A surge in turnout from Georgia?s Black voters has powered the fortunes of Mr. Warnock and Jon Ossoff.You can follow the results here.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2021-01-06
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The Georgia Runoffs, Part 2: ?I Have Zero Confidence in My Vote?

Since the presidential election was called for Joe Biden, President Trump has relentlessly attacked the integrity of the count in Georgia. He has floated conspiracy theories to explain away his loss and attacked Republican officials.

Today, we speak to Republican activists and voters on the ground and consider to what extent, if at all, Mr. Trump?s rhetoric could discourage Republicans from voting in the runoff elections.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Senators Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue have sought to motivate a conservative base that remains loyal to Mr. Trump while also luring back some of the defectors who helped deliver Georgia to a Democratic presidential candidate for the first time since 1992.Democrats may have claimed a bigger share of the early vote than they did in November?s vote, election data shows. Here?s what else we know about the voting in Georgia so far.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2021-01-05
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The Georgia Runoffs, Part 1: ?We Are Black Diamonds.?

A strong Black turnout will be integral to Democratic success in the U.S. Senate races in Georgia this week.

In the first of a two-part examination of election strategies in the Georgia runoffs, we sit down with Stacey Abrams, a Georgia Democrat who has become synonymous with the party?s attempts to win statewide, to talk about her efforts to mobilize Black voters.

And we join LaTosha Brown, a leader of Black Voters Matter, as she heads out to speak to voters.


Guest: Audra D.S. Burch, a national correspondent for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Control of the Senate could hinge on Black voters in Georgia ? and on an ambitious effort by the likes of Black Voters Matter to get them to the polls in the largest numbers ever for the runoff elections on Tuesday.Democrats are making their final push to rally supporters, targeting Black voters in regions far from Atlanta but equally important to Georgia?s emerging Democratic coalition.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2021-01-04
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Genie Chance and the Great Alaska Earthquake: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.

When Alaska was hit by a devastating earthquake in 1964, it was the voice of Genie Chance ? a journalist, wife and mother ? that held the state together in the aftermath.

In the episode, we heard about sociologists from Ohio State University?s Disaster Research Center rushing to Anchorage to study residents? behavior.

Today, Jon Mooallem, who brought us Genie?s story in May, speaks to a sociologist from the University of Delaware to make sense of the current moment and how it compares with the fallout of the Great Alaska Earthquake.


Guest: Jon Mooallem, writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and author of ?This Is Chance!,? a book about the aftermath of the earthquake.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background Reading:

For our Opinion section, Jon Mooallem wrote about the lessons of the 1964 earthquake.Listen to Jon talk about his experience writing and researching for his book about the aftermath of the disaster on an episode of The Times?s Book Review podcast.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


2020-12-31
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?Who Replaces Me??: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.

Scott Watson ? a Black police officer in his hometown, Flint, Mich. ? has worked to become a pillar of the community. And he always believed his identity put him in a unique position to discharge his duties.

After watching the video of the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody in May, his job became a source of self-consciousness instead of pride.

Today, we call up Scott once again and ask how he?s been doing and how things have been in his police department.


Guest: Scott Watson, a police officer in Flint, Mich.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Lynsea Garrison wrote about interviewing Scott in an edition of The Daily newsletter.Many Black and Hispanic officers in New York City have found themselves caught between competing loyalties in the wake of the killing of George Floyd.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-30
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A New Way to Mourn: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes from this year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran.

In our society, the public part of mourning is ritualized by a coming together. What do we do now that the opportunity for collective mourning has been taken away?

Earlier this year, we heard the story of Wayne Irwin. A retired minister of the United Church of Canada who lost his wife, Flora May, during the coronavirus pandemic.

He never once considered delaying her memorial, opting to celebrate her life over the internet ? a new ritual that, as it turned out, felt more authentic and real.

Today, we check back in with Wayne to find out how he?s been doing in the months since his wife?s passing.


Guest: Catherine Porter, Toronto bureau chief for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

The rituals of our lives have been transformed. An expert on gathering shares advice for birthdays and baby showers in our audio series ?Together Apart.?


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-29
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How a Small Bar Battled to Survive the Coronavirus: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.

When Jack Nicas, a technology reporter for The Times, first moved to California five years ago, he set about finding a local bar of choice. Unpretentious, cheap and relaxed, the Hatch fit the bill.

Over six months during the coronavirus pandemic, he charted the fortunes of the bar and its staff members as the lockdown threatened to upend the success of the small business.

Today, Jack checks in with the bar?s owner ? Louwenda Kachingwe, known to everyone as Pancho ? to see what has happened since we last heard from him in the fall.


Guest: Jack Nicas, a technology reporter for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Here?s the full article about the Oakland tavern and its staff members as they try to weather the fallout from the pandemic.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


2020-12-28
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The Sunday Read: 'Cher Everlasting'

The escapism of movies took on a new importance during pandemic isolation. Caity Weaver, the author of this week?s Sunday Read, says that to properly embrace this year?s cinematic achievements, the Academy Awards should not only hand out accolades to new releases, but also to the older films that sustained us through this period.

If they did, Caity argues, Cher would be on course to win a second Oscar for her performance as Loretta Castorini in 1987?s ?Moonstruck? ? a film that, under lockdown, was a salve to many.

On today?s episode, a conversation with Cher about the film?s production, cast and legacy.

This story was written by Caity Weaver and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-12-27
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24 Hours Inside a Brooklyn Hospital: An Update

This episode contains strong language.

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.

When New York City was the epicenter of the coronavirus crisis in the U.S., Sheri Fink, a public health correspondent for The Times, was embedded at the Brooklyn Hospital Center.

In April, she brought us the story of a single day in its intensive care unit, where a majority of patients were sick with the virus.

Today, we check back in with one of the doctors we heard from on the episode, the unflappable Dr. Josh Rosenberg.


Guest: Sheri Fink, a correspondent covering public health for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

?Covid will not win? ? here are some portraits and interviews with the staff members powering the Brooklyn Hospital Center.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-24
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The Year in Good News

A few weeks ago, we put a callout on The Daily, asking people to send in their good news from a particularly bleak year.

The response was overwhelming. Audio messages poured into our inboxes from around the world, with multiple emails arriving every minute. There was a man who said that he had met Oprah and realized he was an alcoholic, a woman who shared that she had finally found time to finish a scarf after five years and another man who said he had finished his thesis on representations of horsemanship in American cinema. Eventually, we decided to construct the entire show out of these messages.

This episode is the result ? a Daily holiday card of good news, from our team to you.

2020-12-23
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The Lives They Lived

It is a very human thing, at the end of a year, to stop and take stock. Part of that involves acknowledging that some remarkable people who were here in 2020 will be not joining us in 2021.

Today, we take a moment to honor the lives of four of those people. And in marveling at the extraordinary and sometimes vividly ordinary facets of their time among us, we hold a mirror up to the complexities of our own lives.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-22
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Delilah

The radio host Delilah has been on the air for more than 40 years. She takes calls from listeners across the United States, as they open up about their heavy hearts, their hopes and the important people in their lives.

She tells callers that they?re loved, and then she plays them a song. ?A love song needs a lyric that tells a story,? she says. ?And touches your heart, either makes you laugh, or makes you cry or makes you swoon.?

On today?s episode, producers Andy Mills and Bianca Giaever do what millions before them have done: They call Delilah.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

2020-12-21
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The Sunday Read: 'The Movement to Bring Death Closer'

?If death practices reveal a culture?s values,? writes Maggie Jones, the author of today?s Sunday Read, ?we choose convenience, outsourcing, an aversion to knowing or seeing too much.?

Enter home-funeral guides, practitioners who believe families can benefit from tending to ? and spending time with ? the bodies of the deceased.

On today?s Sunday Read, listen to Ms. Jones?s story about the home-funeral movement and the changing nature of America?s funeral practices.

This story was written by Maggie Jones and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-12-20
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Evicted During the Pandemic

For years there has been an evictions crisis in the United States. The pandemic has made it more acute.

On today?s episode, our conversations with a single mother of two from Georgia over several months during the pandemic. After she lost her job in March, the bottom fell out of her finances and eviction papers started coming. The federal safety net only stretched so far.

And we ask, with Congress seeking to pass another stimulus bill, what do the next few months hold for renters in the United States?


Guest: Matthew Desmond, a Professor of Sociology at Princeton University and contributing writer for The Times Magazine.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Emergency pandemic funding to help renters must be distributed by Dec. 30. But getting the money to those who need it is no small task.Residents of weekly rentals worry they will be kicked out if they can?t pay the rent. It?s unclear if the federal moratorium on evictions applies to them.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-18
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Should Facebook Be Broken Up?

This episode contains strong language.

When the photo-sharing app Instagram started to grow in popularity in the 2010s, the chief executive of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, had two options: build something comparable or buy it out. He opted for the latter.

The subsequent $1 billion deal is central to a case being brought against Facebook by the federal government and 48 attorneys general. They want to see the social network broken up.

Will they succeed? On today?s episode, we look at one of the biggest cases to hit Silicon Valley in decades.


Guest: Mike Isaac, a technology correspondent for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Regulators have accused Facebook of buying up rising rivals to cement its dominance over social media.The cases against Facebook are far from a slam dunk ? the standards of proof are formidable.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-17
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Hacked, Again

Undetected for months, sophisticated hackers working on behalf of a foreign government were able to breach computer networks across a number of U.S. government agencies. It?s believed to be the handiwork of Russian intelligence.

And this is far from the first time.

Today, why and how such hacks keep happening and the delicate calculation that dictates how and if America retaliates.


Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

In one of the most sophisticated and perhaps largest hacks in more than five years, email systems were breached at the Treasury and Commerce Departments. Other breaches are under investigation.The sophistication and scope of the attack has stunned experts. About 18,000 private and government users downloaded a Russian tainted software update ? a Trojan horse of sorts ? that gave its hackers a foothold into victims? systems, according to SolarWinds, the company whose software was compromised.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-16
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America?s First Coronavirus Vaccinations

North Dakota and New Orleans have been hit particularly hard by the coronavirus.

On today?s episode, we speak to health care workers in both places as they become some of the first to receive and administer the vaccine, and tap into the mood of hope and excitement tempered by a bleak fact: The battle against Covid-19 is not yet over.


Guest: Jack Healy, a national correspondent for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Monday?s vaccinations, the first in a staggeringly complicated national campaign, were a moment infused with hope and pain for hundreds of America?s health care workers.Some of the very medical centers that have endured the worst of the coronavirus found the gloom that has long filled their corridors replaced by elation. The vaccine campaign, however, began on the same day that America surpassed 300,000 deaths from Covid-19.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-15
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The U.S. Approves a Vaccine

The Food and Drug Administration authorized Pfizer?s Covid-19 vaccine for emergency use on Friday, clearing the way for millions of highly vulnerable people to begin receiving the vaccine within days.

The authorization is a historic turning point in a pandemic that has taken more than 290,000 lives in the United States. With the decision, the United States becomes the sixth country ? in addition to Britain, Bahrain, Canada, Saudi Arabia and Mexico ? to clear the vaccine. Today, we ask the science and health reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr. what might happen next.


Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Pfizer has a deal with the U.S. government to supply 100 million doses of the vaccine by next March. Under that agreement, the shots will be free to the public.The vaccines are on their way, but experts still say a difficult winter of coronavirus infection and death lies ahead.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-14
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The Sunday Read: 'Lovers in Auschwitz, Reunited'

Amid the death and desperation of the Auschwitz concentration camp, two inmates, David Wisnia and Helen Spitzer, found love.

On today?s episode, the story of how they found each other ? first within the camp and again, seven decades later.

This story was written by Keren Blankfeld and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-12-13
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A Guide to Georgia?s Senate Runoffs

In three weeks, an election will take place that could be as important as the presidential vote in determining the course of the next four years.

The Jan. 5 runoff elections in Georgia will determine whether two Republican senators, David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler, keep their seats. If their Democratic challengers, Jon Ossoff and the Rev. Raphael Warnock, both win, Democrats would claim control of the Senate, giving President-Elect Joe Biden expanded power to realize his policy agenda.

Today, we offer a guide to the two Senate races in Georgia.


Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national political reporter for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

In the runoffs, Republicans are focusing attacks on the Rev. Raphael Warnock, portraying him as radical, a claim he has rejected.Some Atlanta suburbs that used to be ?blood red? went blue in November. After helping deliver the presidency to Democrats, we examined whether they might give them the Senate, too.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-11
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Why Did the U.S. Turn Down Vaccine Doses?

From the start of the pandemic, the Trump administration said it was committed to ordering and stockpiling enough potential vaccine doses to end the outbreak in the United States as quickly as possible.

But new reporting from The Times has revealed that Pfizer, the maker of the first vaccine to show effectiveness against the coronavirus, tried unsuccessfully to get the government to lock in 100 million extra doses.

Today, we investigate how the Trump administration missed that opportunity and what the repercussions might be.


Guest: Sharon LaFraniere, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

U.S. officials had the opportunity to secure enough doses of Pfizer?s coronavirus vaccine to inoculate most of the country ? at no upfront cost to the government. Instead, they turned down the offer.With a smaller-than-expected order from the United States, Pfizer turned to fulfilling orders from other countries, like Britain, which began vaccinating people this week.
2020-12-10
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The Beginning of the End of the Pandemic

In Britain, news that the country had become the first to start administering a fully tested coronavirus vaccine was met with hope, excitement ? and some trepidation.

Amid the optimism that normal life might soon resume, there is also concern. Has the vaccine been developed too fast? Is it safe? On today?s episode, we examine how Britons feel about the prospect of receiving a shot and attend a vaccination clinic in Wales.


Guest: Megan Specia, a story editor based in London for the New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

For the first recipients of the vaccine, among them older Britons and hundreds of doctors and nurses who pulled the National Health Service through the pandemic, the shots offered a glimpse at a return to normalcy.Dr. Chris Hingston was one of the first health care workers in Britain to receive the vaccine. He was clearly aware that the simple act had a greater purpose: protecting not only himself, but hopefully his family, colleagues and patients from a potentially life-threatening virus.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-09
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Trump Shut the Door on Migrants. Will Biden Open It?

Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter for The Times, says there is one word that sums up the Trump administration?s approach to border crossing: deterrence. For nearly four years, the U.S. government has tried to discourage migrants, with reinforced walls, family separation policies and threats of deportation.

Those policies have led to the appearance of a makeshift asylum-seeker camp of frayed tents and filthy conditions within walking distance of the United States.

Today, we ask: What will the legacy of President Trump?s immigration policies be? And will anything change next year?


Guest: Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter for The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

This is what we saw inside the tent camp on the U.S.-Mexico border.The Trump administration?s immigration policies have not deterred pregnant women from trying to enter the United States. Here are some of their experiences.A federal judge last week ordered the Trump administration to fully restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, an Obama-era program designed to shield young, undocumented immigrants from deportation.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-08
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?It Has All Gone Too Far?

The state of the 2020 U.S. election is, still, not a settled matter in Georgia. For weeks, conservatives have been filing lawsuits in state and federal courts in an effort to decertify results that gave a victory to Joe Biden. On Twitter, President Trump has been making unsubstantiated claims that the state has been ?scammed.?

With Georgia in political turmoil, threats of violence have been made against state election officials, who have been scrambling to recount votes by hand, and against their families.

Still, dozens of prominent national Republicans have stayed silent.

Last week, Gabriel Sterling, a little-known election official in Georgia, did something his party is refusing to do: condemn the president?s claims.

For today?s episode, we called him to ask why he decided to speak up.


Guest: Gabriel Sterling, a Republican official who is the voting system implementation manager in Georgia.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here


Background reading:

?Stop inspiring people to commit potential acts of violence. Someone is going to get hurt, someone is going to get shot, someone is going to get killed. And it?s not right,? Mr. Sterling said in a four-minute rebuke of the president last week.The last act of the Trump presidency has taken on the stormy elements of a drama more common to history or literature than a modern White House.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-07
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The Sunday Read: ?The Social Life of Forests?

Foresters once regarded trees as solitary individuals: They competed for space and resources, but were otherwise indifferent to one another.

The work of the Canadian ecologist Suzanne Simard upended that, finding that while there is indeed conflict in a forest, there is also negotiation, reciprocity and even selflessness.

Ms. Simard discovered that underground fungal threads link nearly every tree in a forest.

On today?s Sunday Read, listen to an exploration of these links and the influential and contentious work of Ms. Simard.

This story was written by Ferris Jabr and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-12-06
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The President and Pre-Emptive Pardons

The power to pardon criminals or commute their sentences is one of the most sacred and absolute a president has, and President Trump has already used it to rescue political allies and answer the pleas of celebrities.

With his term coming to an end, the president has discussed granting three of his children, his son-in-law and personal lawyer pre-emptive pardons ? a rarity in American history.

We look ahead to a potential wave of pardons and commutations ? and explore who could benefit.


Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here


Background reading:

Speculation about pardon activity at the White House is churning furiously, underscoring how much the Trump administration has been dominated by investigations and criminal prosecutions of people in the president?s orbit.The president?s pardoning of Michael Flynn, a former national security adviser, signals the prospect of a wave of pardons and commutations in his final weeks in office.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-04
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?Something Terrible Has Happened?

This episode contains descriptions of sexual assault.

When the Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy this year, it created a final window for claims of sexual abuse against the organization?s leaders.

Within nine months, nearly 100,000 victims filed suits ? that far eclipses the number of sexual-abuse allegations that the Roman Catholic Church faced in the early 2000s.

Today, we hear from one of the victims, Dave Henson, a 40-year-old naval officer who was sexually abused for five years by one of his scout troop?s leaders. Alcoholism and emotional trauma followed. Now, he has joined the ranks of thousands of people seeking redress.


Guest: Mike Baker, Seattle bureau chief for The New York Times.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here


Background reading:

The bankruptcy proceedings allowed the Boy Scouts organization to keep operating while it grapples with questions about the future of the century-old movement.The deluge of sex-abuse claims documents a decades-long accumulation of assaults at the hands of scout leaders across the nation who had been trusted as role models.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2020-12-03
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Biden?s Cabinet Picks, Part 2: Antony Blinken

What kind of foreign policy is possible for the United States after four years of isolationism under President Trump?

Antony Blinken, President-elect Joe Biden?s pick for secretary of state, has an interventionist streak, but some vestiges of Trump-era foreign policy will be hard to upend.

If confirmed, Mr. Blinken faces the challenge of making the case at home that taking a fuller role abroad is important, while persuading international allies that the United States can be counted on.

What course is he likely to steer through that narrow channel?

Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.

We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Mr. Blinken?s extensive foreign policy credentials are expected to help calm American diplomats and global leaders after four years of the Trump administration?s ricocheting strategies and nationalist swaggering.European allies of the United States have welcomed a president who doesn?t see them as rivals. But with the possibility of a Republican-controlled Senate, they are also wary.Mr. Biden wants to reactivate the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, but the killing of the top nuclear scientist in the Middle Eastern nation, which Tehran has blamed on Israel, could complicate that aim.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


2020-12-02
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Biden?s Cabinet Picks, Part 1: Janet Yellen

Janet Yellen, who is poised to become secretary of the Treasury, will immediately have her work cut out for her. The U.S. economy is in a precarious state and Congress is consumed by partisan politics.

Ms. Yellen, however, is no stranger to crisis. She has already held the government?s other top economic jobs ? including chairwoman of the Federal Reserve from 2014 to 2018, helping the country through the last major financial emergency.

Now, facing another steep challenge, we look at the measures she might take to get the economy humming again.


Guest: Jeanna Smialek, who covers the Federal Reserve and the economy for The New York Times.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Ms. Yellen became an economist when few women entered the discipline. She is now set to become the first female Treasury secretary and one of the few people ever to have wielded economic power from the White House, the Federal Reserve and the president?s cabinet.While she may have excelled at some big jobs in the past, this role may be her hardest yet.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


2020-12-01
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When and How You?ll Get a Vaccine

For Americans, months of collective isolation and fear could soon be winding down. A coronavirus vaccine may be just weeks away.

According to Dr. Moncef Slaoui, head of Operation Warp Speed, the federal effort to accelerate vaccine development, the first Americans could receive the vaccine in mid-December.

With the vaccine within reach, we turn to more logistical questions: Who will receive the shots first? Who will distribute them? And what could go wrong?


Guest: Katie Thomas, who covers the drug industry for The New York Times.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


Background reading:

Promising clinical trials have buoyed hope that the end of the pandemic is in sight. But even if the vaccines are authorized, only a sliver of the American public will be able to get one by the end of the year.In mid-December, 6.4 million doses of Pfizer?s vaccine are expected to be shipped across the United States in an initial push.
2020-11-30
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A Day at the Food Pantry

On a day early this fall, Nikita Stewart, who covers social services for The New York Times, and the Daily producers Annie Brown and Stella Tan spent a day at Council of Peoples Organization, a food pantry in Brooklyn, speaking to its workers and clients.

As with many other pantries in the city, it has seen its demand rocket during the pandemic as many New Yorkers face food shortages. And with the year drawing to a close, many of New York City?s pantries ? often run with private money ? face a funding crisis.

Today, the story of one day in the operations of a New York food pantry.


Guest: Nikita Stewart, who covers social services for The New York Times; Annie Brown, a senior audio producer for The Times; and Stella Tan, an associate audio producer for The Times.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


Background reading:

Here are five key statistics that show how hunger is worsening in New York City.An estimated 1.5 million New Yorkers can?t afford food, and tens of thousands have shown up at the city?s food pantries since the pandemic began. But there is relief and hope when they are at home cooking.
2020-11-25
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A Failed Attempt to Overturn the Election

Pressure and litigation appear to have been the pillars of President Trump?s response to his general election loss.

His team filed a litany of court cases in battleground states. In some, such as Georgia and Michigan, the president and his allies took an even more bullish approach, attempting to use their influence to bear down on election officials.

As preparations for the transfer of power finally get underway, we take a look at how the Trump campaign?s attempts to overturn the election played out.


Guest: Jim Rutenberg, a writer-at-large for The New York Times and The Times Magazine, walks us through the Trump campaign?s strategy in key states.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


Background reading:

The Trump administration?s authorization of the transition process is a strong sign that the president?s last-ditch bid to overturn the results of the election is coming to an end. But he has yet to concede the election.In a chaotic effort to overturn the election results, the president and his campaign lawyers have spent weeks claiming without convincing proof that rampant fraud corrupted vote tallies in many battleground states.These efforts heavily targeted cities with large Black populations.
2020-11-24
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New York City?s 3 Percent Problem

This week New York City?s public schools will close their doors and students will once again undertake online instruction.

The shutdown was triggered when 3 percent of coronavirus tests in the city came back positive over seven days. There are questions, however, around this number being used as a trigger ? some health officials maintain that schools are safe.

When is the right time for schools to reopen and what is the right threshold for closures? We explore what lessons New York City?s struggles hold for the rest of the nation.


Guest: Eliza Shapiro, who covers New York City education for The New York Times, walks us through the city?s decision to reopen schools and the difficult decision to shut them down.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


Background reading:

New York City?s public school system will close this week, moving to all-remote instruction and disrupting the education of roughly 300,000 children.As schools close again, frustrated and angry parents say the decision does not make the city safer.
2020-11-23
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The Sunday Read: 'Man to Man'

For years, Wil S. Hylton had been drawn to his cousin?s strength and violence. He was pulled in by the archetype that he embodied and was envious of the power he seemed to command.

Wil describes his relative?s violence as ?ambient? and ?endemic,? but he was sure it wouldn?t turn on him. Until a few years ago, when his cousin tried to kill him.

?My attraction to my cousin and my detachment as a husband both reside in the pantheon of male tropes,? he wrote. ?Masculinity is a religion. It?s a compendium of saints: the vaunted patriarch, the taciturn cowboy, the errant knight, the reluctant hero, the gentle giant and omniscient father.?

On today?s Sunday Read, Wil?s wide-ranging exploration of masculinity.

This story was written by Wil S. Hylton and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-11-22
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When the Pandemic Came to Rural Wisconsin

When the pandemic struck, Patty Schachtner, in her capacity as both a member of the Wisconsin State Senate and chief medical officer for St. Croix County, tried to remain one step ahead. It was an approach criticized by many in her conservative community.

She was preparing for the worst-case scenario. And now it has arrived ? cases and deaths are on the rise in Wisconsin.

We chart her journey through the months of the pandemic.


Guest: Julie Bosman, who covers the Midwest for The New York Times, spoke with Patty Schachtner over several months about how she was experiencing the pandemic.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


Background reading:

The recent coronavirus outbreak in Wisconsin has escalated rapidly. Here is our case tracker for the state.As coronavirus cases rise across the United States, death rates have been rising far more slowly. But there are signs that this is shifting. Last week, Wisconsin was among a number of states that recorded more deaths in the previous seven days than in any other week of the pandemic.
2020-11-20
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The Pandemic Economy in 7 Numbers

There are several figures that tell the story of the American economy right now.

Some are surprisingly positive ? the housing market is booming ? while others paint a more dire picture.

Using seven key numbers, we look at the sectors that have been affected most profoundly and consider what the path to recovery might look like.


Guest: Ben Casselman, who covers economics and business for The New York Times, walks us through the pandemic?s impact.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


Background reading:

Here is Ben?s snapshot of the key data points for understanding the impact of the pandemic on the economy.The expiration of two critical programs at the end of this year could leave millions of Americans vulnerable and short-circuit the nation?s precarious recovery.
2020-11-19
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The Rise, Fall and Resurrection of the Taliban

President Trump is pushing the military to accelerate the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan, all but guaranteeing a major place for the Taliban in the country?s future.

As a child, Mujib Mashal lived through the Taliban?s takeover of Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan. Now a senior correspondent there for The New York Times, he has for years reported on the extremist group and, more recently, has covered the progress of peace talks.

In this episode of ?The Daily,? he shares memories of his childhood and tales from his reporting, and reflects on whether a peaceful resolution is possible.


Guest: Mujib Mashal, senior correspondent in Afghanistan for The New York Times.


We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily


Background reading:

President Trump is expected to order the U.S. military to withdraw thousands of troops from Afghanistan, Iraq and Somalia by the time he leaves office in January.The Taliban have outlasted a superpower through nearly 19 years of grinding war and now stand on the brink of realizing their most fervent desire: U.S. troops leaving Afghanistan. They have given up little of their extremist ideology to do it.Children of men who played key roles in the war against the Soviets in the 1980s are on both sides of the negotiations between the Afghan government and the Taliban. They know all too well what is at stake.
2020-11-18
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