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Design Thinking 101

Design Thinking 101

Design Thinking 101: Learning, Leading, and Applying Design Thinking Design Thinking 101 helps listeners learn about design-driven innovation, connect design thinking to strategy and action, and explore learning from challenges overcome while applying design thinking and related innovation approaches. You'll hear design practitioners' stories, lessons, ideas, resources, and tips. Our guests share insights on how to deliver results with design thinking in business, social innovation, education, design, government, healthcare and other fields.

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UX Research + Research Teams + UX Camp DC with Glennette Clark ? DT101 E80

Glennette Clark is a UX researcher and an entrepreneur. We talk about UX research, research teams, and UX Camp DC.

Listen to learn about:

UX research ? What is it? The U.S. Digital Service Onboarding new team members Trauma-informed research and design UXCamp DC and the unconference format

 

Our Guest

Glennette Clark is a design researcher at United States Digital Service. She brings human-centered design practices to federal agencies including U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. She?s an adjunct professor at MICA in the Design Leadership program.

She founded UXCamps DC & NYC and joined the DC Innovation & Technology Inclusion Council in 2010.

Glennette has a Strategic Design MBA from Philadelphia University and BA in journalism from Howard University. She lives in DC with her husband, two children and a dog.

 

Show Highlights

[01:05] Glennette?s journey into UX began with a degree in journalism, where she learned the interviewing skills that would serve her later in her research work.

[03:01] The difference between moderated and unmoderated interviews.

[04:37] What is UX research?

[05:08] The importance of interviews in UX research.

[06:48] How Glennette uses interviews to help people understand UX research and how to use it.

[08:18] The different ways Glennette presents research results depending on the audience.

[11:22] Glennette shares one of her favorite research stories.

[13:22] Why interviewing people with lived experience is so important when researching.

[15:18] Glennette?s work with the United States Digital Service.

[17:01] Advice for those about to embark on their own problem space research.

[17:33] The benefit of ?How might we? questions.

[19:57] Why the language you use in framing your research matters.

[21:37] Trauma-informed design and how it fits into human-centered design.

[23:04] Glennette talks about a community design project she worked on.

[24:06] Ways to reduce the chance of doing harm when conducting interviews.

[26:35] The importance of team health, and what it means to have a healthy team.

[29:05] How to help a new person get up and running with a team.

[32:09] UXCamp DC?s beginning, and where it is now, twenty years later.

[34:17] How the ?unconference? format works.

[35:29] Past presentation topics.

[36:22] Glennette?s desire to combine community-based design and service design to help community organizations achieve their missions.

[39:17] Books and resources Glennette recommends.

[42:16] Tools Glennette likes to use in her work.

 

Links 

Glennette on Twitter

Glennette on LinkedIn

Glennette on MICA

Designing with Empathy

U.S. Digital Service

UXCamp DC

Book Recommendation: Mismatch: How Inclusion Shapes Design, by Kat Holmes

Book Recommendation: Thinking in Systems: A Primer, by Donella H. Meadows

Book Recommendation: 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People, and 100 More Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People, by Susan Weinschenk

Book Recommendation: 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School, by Matthew Frederick

Book Recommendation: Meeting Design: For Managers, Makers, and Everyone, by Kevin M. Hoffman

The Values Deck | A Card Sorting Game to Explore Your Personal Values

Creative Whack Pack

Innovative Whack Pack

IDEO Method Cards

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Design Thinking for the Public Sector + Building and Training Design Thinking Teams with Stephanie Wade ? DT101 E14

Teaching Yourself Design Thinking + Innovating in Government with Amy J. Wilson ? DT101 E19

Democracy as a Design Problem with Whitney Quesenbery ? DT101 E68

 

2021-10-19
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Three Little Words for Better (Business) Relationships // ALD 008 ? Ep79

Thank you for listening to this Ask Like a Designer episode of the Design Thinking 101 Podcast.

This episode is about the tremendous power in three little words and a superpower for people who want to think and solve like a designer: listening.

This episode is based on this article: ALD008 // Three Little Words for Better (Business) Relationship. Read the article and others like it on Fluid Hive?s Ask Like a Designer.

In these short Ask Like a Designer episodes on the Design Thinking 101 podcast, you?ll find new ways to explore the show?s stories and ideas about design-driven innovation. I?ll share methods, templates, and ideas that have worked in my practice in teaching.

What did you think of this episode? Please send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team

Cheers ~ Dawan

Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host

President, Fluid Hive

 

Show Highlights

[00:56] It is listening, not love, that is at the core of a strong relationship.

[01:16] The three little words: tell me more.

[01:47] Why ?tell me more? is so powerful.

[01:56] ?Tell me more? is better than ?why.?

[02:36] The importance of good listening.

[02:50] There are many ways of using and phrasing ?tell me more.?

[02:55] When someone stops talking.

[03:15] Parroting the other?s words.

[03:33] Parrot questions.

[03:51] Long silences can encourage someone to keep talking.

[04:14] Spotlighting the other?s silences.

[04:42] Noticing changes.

[05:07] Listening is different from interviewing, advising, or negotiating.

[05:25] When we listen, we learn.

[05:50] Designing an event means creating an environment for good listening.

[06:06] Listening is not passive

[06:12] Listening is fundamental to design.

[06:35] Free Ask Like a Designer tool to help you practice ?tell me more? and in turn, become a better listener.

 

Design Thinking 101 Learning ? Courses and More

Design Thinking 101 Learning helps people learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation. Each training course focuses on a different collection of actions and skills critical to using design thinking effectively and getting the results you seek.

Please join me in the first course, Design Thinking 101 ? Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve

Each course is structured to help your innovation actions create what you need for the people you serve, your organization and yourself.

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 Ask Like a Designer ? DT101 E61

Design, and One Question to Rule Them All // ALD 002 ? DT101 E63

There Are No Problems Worth Solving ? Only Questions Worth Asking // ALD 003 ? DT101 E65

Your Good-Life OS: Designing a System for Living Well and Peak Performance // ALD 004 ? DT101 E67

The Swiss-Army Lives of How-Might-We Questions // ALD 005 ? DT 101 E69

Designing Facilitation: A System for Creating and Leading Exceptional Events // ALD 006 ? DT101 E73

The Innovation Saboteur?s Handbook // ALD 007 ? DT101 E77

2021-10-05
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Design Council UK + Systemic Design + Design in Government with Cat Drew ? DT101 E78

Cat Drew is the chief design officer at the Design Council. We talk about the role and work of Design Council, systemic design, and the shifting role of design and government and communities.

Listen in to learn more about:

Design Council?s work The frameworks Design Council has developed The Design Economy How designers can learn from non-designers who are practicing design out in their local communities Asset-based design Speculative design Amble Harbour, a small fishing village in the UK

Our Guest?s Bio

Cat Drew is the Chief Design Officer at the Design Council where she brings together architecture and the built environment, public sector design and business innovation to support people in living healthier, happier and safer lives. Previously, Cat has held leadership positions at FutureGov and Uscreates, was a co-founder of the UK government?s Policy Lab, and combines 10 years of experience in government with an MA in Graphic Design. She speaks widely about the value of design and co-presents BBC Radio 4 The Fix. She is a member of The Point People.

 

Show Highlights

[01:04] Cat?s path from civil servant to designer.

[01:38] Her frustration while working for the government.

[02:39] Helping to co-found the Policy Lab and discovering design.

[05:15] Her work at Design Council.

[06:25] The biggest internal development happening at Design Council right now.

[08:29] One example of the collaborative aspect of the Design Council?s work.

[10:28] The Design Council?s double diamond framework.

[11:37] The Framework for Innovation builds on the double diamond and adds in culture change.

[12:21] The complex challenges design is being asked to solve.

[13:00] The new Systemic Design framework the Design Council developed to help with these challenges.

[16:02] Cat talks about Design Council?s role with regard to people using this new framework.

[17:40] Design ?translation? as a core role of the Design Council.

[18:09] The ways in which language changes meanings in different communities.

[19:46] Different groups and individuals see and experience a system very differently.

[20:55] The social dreaming concept.

[21:57] Cat talks about some of Design Council?s research and projects.

[22:31] The Design Economy.

[24:31] Design Difference, a project born out of COVID-19 and the pandemic.

[27:10] Learning from non-designers who are out there doing design work in their communities.

[29:35] Asset-based design starts from what?s strong instead of what?s wrong.

[31:22] Cat talks about where design is heading.

[31:50] Designers working to deliberately change and redesign systems.

[33:50] Three themes Design Council is seeing in design now.

[35:52] Encouraging more people to experiment and play with design in the real world.

[38:11] Ways to use and support the work Design Council is doing.

[39:08] The importance of speculative design in supporting creativity.

[39:58] Policy Lab?s The Future of Aging project.

[41:54] Resources Cat recommends for those interested in design.

[43:40] Cat answers the question, ?what?s your best story about design?? with a story about Amble Harbour, a fishing village in the UK. 

Links

Cat on Twitter

Cat on LinkedIn

Cat on Medium

Design Council UK

BBC Radio 4: The Fix

Interview with Cat at UX Connections

Interview with Cat at Design Week

Speculative Design

Design: Into the Ether

TEDxWhitehall: Making government better, through data and design

Book Recommendation: Why Materials Matter: Responsible Design for a Better World, by Seetal Solanki and Liz Corbin

Rooted By Design

Natasha Trotman

  

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Design Thinking for the Public Sector + Building and Training Design Thinking Teams with Stephanie Wade ? DT101 E14

Teaching Yourself Design Thinking + Innovating in Government with Amy J. Wilson ? DT101 E19

Democracy as a Design Problem with Whitney Quesenbery ? DT101 E68

2021-09-21
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The Innovation Saboteur?s Handbook // ALD 007 ? DT101 E77

This episode is about sabotaging innovation projects. You?ll learn new ways to get in your own way and everyone else?s. 

This episode is based on this article: ALD007 // The Innovation Saboteur?s Handbook. Read the article and download a guide to sabotage proofing innovation projects. You don?t want anyone to steal your destructive glory. You?ll find more articles like these on Fluid Hive?s Ask Like a Designer

Thank you for listening to this Ask Like a Designer episode of the Design Thinking 101 Podcast.

In these short Ask Like a Designer episodes on the Design Thinking 101 podcast, you?ll find new ways to explore the show?s stories and ideas about design-driven innovation. I?ll share methods, templates, and ideas that have worked in my practice in teaching. 

What did you think of this episode? Please send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team.

Cheers ~ Dawan

Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host

President, Fluid Hive

 

Show Highlights

[00:35] Your inner saboteur. Sometimes you just want to break things.

Sabotage Moves

     [01:41] Lack of focus.

     [02:13] Refusing to adapt your problem as you learn.

     [02:28] Lack of research.

     [02:59] Lack of teamwork.

     [03:32] Not enough data-gathering.

     [04:00] Lack of planning.

     [04:35] Not testing multiple possible solutions.

     [05:17] Not working with the delivery team.

     [05:53] Ignoring the systems you?re working within.

     [06:25] Lack of process and outcome measurement.

[07:28] Free Ask Like a Designer tool: Stopping Innovation Sabotage.

 

Design Thinking 101 Learning ? Courses and More

Design Thinking 101 Learning helps people learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation. Each training course focuses on a different collection of actions and skills critical to using design thinking effectively and getting the results you seek. 

Please join me in the first course, Design Thinking 101 ? Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve

Each course is structured to help your innovation actions create what you need for the people you serve, your organization and yourself.

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Ask Like a Designer ? DT101 E61

Design, and One Question to Rule Them All // ALD 002 ? DT101 E63

There Are No Problems Worth Solving ? Only Questions Worth Asking // ALD 003 ? DT101 E65

Your Good-Life OS: Designing a System for Living Well and Peak Performance // ALD 004 ? DT101 E67

The Swiss-Army Lives of How-Might-We Questions // ALD 005 ? DT 101 E69

Designing Facilitation: A System for Creating and Leading Exceptional Events // ALD 006 ? DT101 E73

2021-09-07
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Working and Leading at the Intersection of Engineering, Business and Design with Kevin Bethune ? DT101 E76

Kevin Bethune is the founder and chief creative officer for dreams ? design + life, and the board chair of the Design Management Institute. We talk about working and leading at the intersection of engineering, business and design.

 

Listen in to learn more about:

The synergy Kevin created between three disciplines: engineering, business, and design Kevin?s years at Nike How to build an environment that encourages and fuels creativity Kevin?s way of onboarding teams The importance of evidence collection and world-building in Kevin?s work Design?s leadership during the pandemic The future of design, and the need for more equity, diversity and inclusion in the industry

 

Our Guest?s Bio

Kevin Bethune is the Founder and Chief Creative Officer of dreams ? design + life, a "think tank" that delivers design & innovation services using a human-centered approach. Kevin's background spans engineering, business and design in equal proportion over his 20+ year career, positioning him to help brands deliver meaningful innovations to enrich people's lives. 

Kevin began his career as a mechanical engineer in the nuclear power industry.  This chapter gave him deep product experience working with high performing teams across 14 nuclear reactor upgrade campaigns. After his MBA, Kevin joined Nike, Inc. in a business capacity, but quickly navigated to the Global Footwear product engine to drive advanced digital product creation capabilities, discovering the world of design in the process. After solidifying his creative foundation through further studies at ArtCenter College of Design, Kevin co-founded distinct design & innovation capabilities at two Tier 1 management consulting firms in Booz & Co. and the Boston Consulting Group (BCG). As Vice President of Strategic Design at BCG Digital Ventures, he led a large cohort of designers that would influence and shape every corporate venture spun out from the incubator. Kevin left BCG Digital Ventures to carve his own path under the banner of dreams ? design + life, focusing on unlocking human potential through strategic design, industrial design and the building of new ecologies.

 

Show Highlights

[01:21] The childhood creative itch that started Kevin on the path towards design.

[01:37] How growing up in Detroit influenced him as a child, and led him into engineering.

[02:37] Jumping into the nuclear power industry after finishing his Engineering degree.

[03:29] How engineering gave him an interest in business strategy and going to business school to earn his MBA.

[04:34] Transitioning to a job at Nike, and his introduction to design in a professional capacity.

[06:03] Getting the chance to design shoes at Nike.

[06:44] Being able to accept failure is key to the creative process.

[07:21] The challenges Kevin faced at Nike while trying to create cross-disciplinary connections.

[08:15] Finding people willing to act as mentors, supporters, and advocates.

[09:24] The importance of curiosity and user observation to Kevin?s work.

[12:23] Kevin faces a fork in the road of his work and where he wanted to go.

[13:53] Leaving Nike to go back to graduate school to study design.

[14:45] Kevin talks about his experience going back to school as a mid-career professional.

[18:32] Separating the work from one?s self.

[19:17] Appreciating his wife?s support.

[22:17] Working with Booz and company and founding Booz Digital after finishing his design degree.

[22:54] Moving to work with BCG.

[23:21] Kevin talks about how the team worked with clients.

[24:45] The multi-team, design thinking environment that evolved and how it fueled creativity.

[26:09] Getting executive buy-in and support.

[28:28] The paradigms and techniques that helped the teams navigate through conflict.

[30:11] Creating a culture of safety where people felt it was OK to raise concerns.

[31:14] Onboarding teams and having them talk about roles, norms and culture at the start.

[33:27] Kevin talks about the decision and process of founding his own design organization.

[35:51] The two priorities Kevin focuses on when it comes to choosing projects and clients.

[38:39] The early months of the company, and the surprising way business came to his doorstep.

[39:40] The surprising focus of Kevin?s first conversations with potential clients.

[42:59] How the pandemic has changed Kevin?s work.

[46:18] The ways in which design is taking a leadership role as everyone tries to figure out what work will look like in the future.

[48:29] The topics and issues Kevin feels need to be part of the conversations designers are having as a community.

[49:26] Finding ways to connect and engage with other creative communities.

[50:07] The importance of pushing for more equity, diversity and inclusion in the design industry.

[54:52] Kevin offers advice for what those in leadership roles can do to ensure that they are moving the conversation and industry forward, and not contributing to existing barriers.

[58:45] Resources Kevin recommends for those interested in design.

 

Links

Kevin on Twitter

Kevin on Instagram

Kevin on LinkedIn

Kevin profile on IDSA?s website

dreams ? design + life

Design is [Dreaming]: Curiosity and innovation

TED Talk: The 4 Superpowers of Design

ArtCenter College of Design podcast: Realizing Dreams Through Design

ArtCenter College of Design Alumni Story: Kevin Bethune: Powerful design that goes the distance

Core77: Building a Brighter Design Future Means Taking a Hard Look at the Industry?s Deepest Flaws

DV Alumni: Human-Centered Design with Kevin Bethune

ALU Podcast: Design Thinking in Business

How to Future-Proof Your Design Career

Book Recommendation: The Laws of Simplicity, by John Maeda
Book Recommendation: Mismatch: How Inclusion Shapes Design, by Kat Holmes
Book Recommendation: Designing Design, by Kenya Hara

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Learning Service Design + Leading Service Transformation with Clive Grinyer ? DT101 E66

A Designer's Journey into Designing for Health and Healthcare with Lorna Ross ? DT101 E45

Designing Culture at Work + Social Innovation + Necessary Disquiet with Lauren Currie ? DT101 E29

2021-08-24
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Employee Experience by Design: How to Create an Effective EX for Competitive Advantage with Belinda Gannaway ? DT101 E75

Belinda Gannaway is the co-author of Employee Experience by Design and the Director at Fathom XP, an employee experience design agency based in the UK. She?s also a facilitator and a team and systems coach. Today, we discuss her book, and what's possible when we apply design thinking to orchestrating how people perform and produce results in organizations.

 

Listen to learn about:

Using design thinking to create better employee experiences How our relationship with the work we do has changed Helping organizational leadership to understand the why of employee experience design The way the COVID-19 pandemic is changing how organizations think about their employees The drastic ways experience design and employee experience design have changed due to the pandemic How to discover what matters to your employees Three key principles of employee experience design The future of work and employee experience?s role in that future

 

Our Guest

Belinda Gannaway is an employee experience design practitioner, facilitator and team coach. She is co-author of Employee Experience by Design: How to Create an Effective EX for Competitive Advantage, published in 2021 by Kogan Page.

Strategy director of EX design consultancy FathomXP, Belinda has been working in and around organizational culture for many years. Her interest in culture began early when she worked as a journalist in the UK Houses of Parliament ? a 1,000-year-old institution.

Belinda's career has covered the worlds of journalism, PR and marketing, digital transformation and culture change. She has worked with some of the world's best-known organizations, including LEGO, Jaguar Land Rover, Diageo and the International Olympic Committee.

 

Show Highlights

[01:08] Dawan talks about the relevance of Employee Experience by Design in today?s pandemic work world.

[01:58] Belinda talks about what sparked her and her co-author, Emma Bridger, to write the book, and how our relationship with work has been changing, even before the pandemic.

[02:33] Employees have become the consumers of the workplace.

[03:01] The two things Belinda and Emma focused on when writing the book.

[03:52] Democratizing great employee experience.

[05:03] How Belinda?s background as a political journalist helped during the writing process.

[06:09] The two ways design thinking is being used in employee experience design.

[07:11] The similarity of experience Belinda discovered was happening across many companies in different countries.

[09:18] Starting from the desire to create better experiences for our employees.

[10:23] Adding in a third diamond, focused on scoping, to the Double Diamond model.

[10:38] The starting point: what does employee experience mean for this organization?

[11:50] The next step is asking: where are we falling short?

]14:31] The connections and inter-relationships between employee experience, employee performance, and the bottom line.

[14:51] Organizational focus on employee experience is often around talent attraction and retention.

[15:38] How the pandemic has changed this focus.

[16:14] The link between a great employee experience and a great customer experience.

[17:30] Writing the book as the pandemic unfolded.

[17:56] Organizations? greater focus on the wellbeing of their employees.

[18:22] Empathy as the ?word of the year.?

[18:37] Experience design and employee experience design have changed drastically because of the pandemic.

[21:01] Belinda offers advice on how organizations can use the book to start the work of looking at their employee experience and changing it for the better.

[21:20] The book uses design thinking and positive psychology in its approach.

[21:49] Start with a conversation around ?tell me about your best experience at work.?

[22:02] The book explains how to set up this conversation in different ways, as needed.

[24:21] The top ideas Belinda hopes people will take from the book and put into practice.

[25:07] Three key principles of employee experience design.

[27:51] Dawan and Belinda talk about the value of having an experimental mindset.

[32:04] Belinda asks Dawan why he doesn?t use the word ?coach/ing? when he talks about his work.

[34:16] What?s next for employee experience and the future of work.

[39:17] How employees as consumers of the workplace have the potential to change the ethos of business.

[42:03] Belinda shares her go-to tool when she is working with organizations and their employee experience design.

[44:47] Fluid Hive?s resources for those wanting to learn and practice design thinking.

  

Links 

Belinda on Twitter

Belinda on LinkedIn

Designing a meaningful employee experience: An interview with Belinda Gannaway

How to launch or re-energize your employee experience approach

FathomXP

Book Recommendation: Employee Experience by Design: How to Create an Effective EX for Competitive Advantage, by Emma Bridger and Belinda Gannaway

  

Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Building Design Capacity + Measuring Design Value + Designing Studios with Doug Powell ? DT101 E16

Humble Design Leadership + Design Agency and Experience Design Evolution with Aleksandra Melnikova ? DT101 E33

Designing Your Team + Teams in Design Education + Coaching Design Teams with Mary Sherwin and David Sherwin ? DT101 E49

 

Resources

Download Fluid Hive's Innovation Shield ? a guide to avoiding innovation traps by asking 9 of Fluid Hive's Design Thinking Questions

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Learn to Ask Like a Designer and take your innovation projects from frantic to focused by working smart from the start.

 

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills ? people who want to think and solve like a designer.

2021-08-05
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Industrial Design + Design Agency Leadership + Creative Confidence with James Howard ? DT101 E74

James Howard is a teacher, design historian, industrial designer, and inventor of over 300 products with 18 patents. He's currently the owner-operator of Entrepreneurial U, a specialty private design school. Prior to teaching at the county college of Morris in New Jersey, Professor Howard was the owner-operator of the award-winning Howard Design Agency, an industrial design practice whose clients included Coca-Cola, Colgate Palmolive, and Johnson & Johnson.

James is also the owner of Cozy Cupboard Tearoom of Morristown, New Jersey. The English-style business has been a regional favorite for over 10 years. James serves as the Executive Director of the Black Inventors Hall of Fame, a virtual museum devoted to immortalizing African-Americans whose noteworthy inventions have improved lives, yet gone unnoticed.

Listen in to learn more about:

James? journey to become an industrial designer The Howard Design Agency James? years teaching design Entrepreneurial U Growth mindset The power of optimism ? in work, and in life

Show Highlights

[01:55] James talks about his journey into design, and his big sister Doris.

[03:11] Entering his first drawing contest as a young boy.

[03:16] The disappointment of not getting into the graphic design program ? and James? shift into industrial design as a result.

[05:31] Challenges James faced during his undergraduate and graduate years.

[08:56] Getting into graduate school.

[10:38] James? struggles with his first mentor in graduate school.

[12:30] How things changed once he had a strong mentor on his side.

[13:15] Winning a design award from RESNA.

[14:01] His first job as an industrial designer.

[15:49] James? advice for people dealing with bumps in the road.

[16:49] Why James decided to start his own design agency.

[19:51] 15 years at the Howard Design Agency.

[21:10] How running his own agency changed the way James thought about design.

[23:17] James offers advice on how to make a good pitch.

[26:42] The decision to leave his design agency and begin teaching.

[30:59] Founding Entrepreneurial U.

[32:09] James talks about the Bridge program, which helps adults change career pathways.

[32:51] The importance of cultivating a growth mindset.

[33:51] James as the perpetual optimist, and passing that optimism on to his students.

[36:16] Doodling as a second language, to tell stories and convey ideas.

[38:07] Resources James recommends.

[41:18] Where to find out more about James and his work.

[42:30] The Black Inventors? Hall of Fame.

[46:20] Fluid Hive?s resources for those wanting to learn and practice design thinking.

 

Links

James on LinkedIn

Entrepreneurial U

Black Inventors? Hall of Fame

A Conversation with James Howard, Perpetual Optimist

The History of Black Industrial Designers

Book Recommendation: Marketing for the Small Design Firm, by Jim Morgan

Book Recommendation: Who Moved My Cheese: An A-Mazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life, by Spencer Johnson

Book Recommendation: Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us, by Tom Kelley and David Kelley

Book Recommendation: Rebel Talent: Why It Pays to Break the Rules at Work and in Life, by Francesca Gino

Book Recommendation: The Universal Traveler, by James Bagnell and Don Koberg

  

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Learning Service Design + Leading Service Transformation with Clive Grinyer ? DT101 E66

Integrating Engineering, Design and Business with Tony Hu ? DT101 E35

Leading a Design Thinking Consultancy, Betting Small to Win Big, and Driving Business Growth with Design Thinking with Natalie Foley ? DT101 E5

Other Resources

Download Fluid Hive's Innovation Shield ? a guide to avoiding innovation traps by asking 9 of Fluid Hive's Design Thinking Questions

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Learn to Ask Like a Designer and take your innovation projects from frantic to focused by working smart from the start.

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills ? people who want to think and solve like a designer.

2021-07-20
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Designing Facilitation: a system for creating and leading exceptional events // ALD 006 ? DT101 E73

Thank you for listening to this Ask Like a Designer episode of the Design Thinking 101 Podcast.

This episode is all about facilitation. You?ll meet Fluid Hive?s Event Design Questions and learn new ways to create effective events everyone will love. In these short Ask Like a Designer episodes on the show, you?ll find new ways to explore the show?s stories and ideas about design-driven innovation. I?ll share methods, templates, and ideas that have worked in my practice in teaching. 

This episode is based on this article: ALD006 // Designing Facilitation: Create events, workshops and meetings that solve problems, save money, and protect your reputation. Download the Thinking Tool for this ALD article, an event creation guide based on Fluid Hive's Event Design Questions.

What did you think of this episode? Please send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team.

Cheers ~ Dawan

Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host

President, Fluid Hive

 

Show Highlights

[00:58] What do YOU do when you?re tasked with creating and facilitating an event?

[01:51] A better way to create your event: Fluid Hive?s Event Design questions.

[02:15] Fluid Hive?s definition of an event.

[02:34] What is facilitation?

[02:57] Applying Fluid Hive?s See-Solve-Act design process to event design.

[03:20] Seeing the challenge.

[05:34] Seeing the people.

[05:58] Seeing the participants.

[06:38] Seeing the relationships.

[06:55] Seeing the time.

[07:23] Seeing the place.

[07:55] Solving for success.

[08:10] Solving for outcomes.

[08:26] Solving for interaction.

[08:52] Solving for documenting the event.

[09:17] Solving for the guides participants will need.

[09:55] Solving for the breaks participants will need.

[10:15] Solving for the rules and guidelines to keep the event and participants on track.

[10:41] Acting to create the script.

[11:00] Acting to test the script.

[11:25] Acting to plan for contingencies and backups.

[11:54] Acting to take care of the event facilitator, not just the participants.

[12:12] Acting to walk through the delivery dance.

[13:24] Free Ask Like a Designer tool: facilitation design workbook.

[13:55] Design Thinking 101 Learning courses.

[14:07] The Innovation Smart Start webinar. 

 

Design Thinking 101 Learning ? Courses and More

Design Thinking 101 Learning helps people learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation. Each training course focuses on a different collection of actions and skills critical to using design thinking effectively and getting the results you seek.

Please join me in the first course, Design Thinking 101 ? Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve

Each course is structured to help your innovation actions create what you need for the people you serve, your organization and yourself.

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Ask Like a Designer Episodes You Might Like

Ask Like a Designer ? DT101 E61

Design, and One Question to Rule Them All // ALD 002 ? DT101 E63

There Are No Problems Worth Solving ? Only Questions Worth Asking // ALD 003 ? DT101 E65

Your Good-Life OS: Designing a System for Living Well and Peak Performance // ALD 004 ? DT101 E67

The Swiss-Army Lives of How-Might-We Questions // ALD 005 ? DT 101 E69

 

2021-07-08
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Trauma-Informed Design + Participatory Design Perils + Research with Vulnerable Populations with Sarah Fathallah ? DT101 E72

Sarah Fathallah is an independent social designer and researcher. Today, we talk about trauma-informed design, participatory design, and research with vulnerable populations.

Listen to learn more about:

Trauma-informed design Virtual facilitation design Examining power dynamics in design work Participatory design and its connection to trauma-informed design The challenges of compensating community members who participate in the design process

Our Guest

Sarah Fathallah is an independent designer, researcher, and educator, who specializes in applying participatory research and design to the social sector. She has worked on projects of all sizes with non-profits, governments, and social enterprises, on topics ranging from civil and human rights, to healthcare, education, and financial inclusion. Her clients have included the International Domestic Workers Federation, the International Rescue Committee, and Open Society Foundations, to name a few. Sarah?s design work has been honored by the Core77 Design Awards, the International Design Excellence Awards (IDEA), ONE Prize, and the GSMA mWomen Design Challenge. Sarah also co-founded Design Gigs for Good, a free community-driven resource to help more people use the tools of design to create positive social change. Sarah is a graduate of Sciences Po Paris, where she studied International Business and Middle Eastern and Mediterranean Affairs. She also studied design innovation at the Paris Est d.school, user experience design at General Assembly, and participatory design at MIT.

 

Show Highlights

[01:03] Sarah talks about how she stumbled into design.

[01:50] Her introduction to service design while in grad school.

[02:14] Sarah?s career has been focused on using the tools and methods of design in global development.

[02:47] The diverse range of projects Sarah works on.

[04:29] Sarah talks about how the pandemic changed her facilitation work.

[05:32] Ways of ensuring virtual experiences are as robust as in-person.

[07:30] Sarah explains what self holds are and how to use them.

[08:30] What is trauma-informed design?

[11:35] How Sarah helps bring people into trauma-informed design.

[14:18] Sarah offers advice on how to bring trauma-informed design into your own work.

[15:45] The potential problem with user interviews.

[16:22] Ways to learn about trauma and trauma-informed systems.

[18:14] Designers must always acknowledge and reflect on the imperfections in their work and seek to improve.

[20:31] Ways designers can self-reflect and critique the work that they do as they?re doing it.

[23:45] A framework Sarah uses to examine power dynamics.

[24:08] Examining the power differentials in the identities of the people involved.

[25:09] How to make sure you?re not exploiting the community or population you?re designing with and for.

[25:47] Ensuring the community is actively participating in the design work.

[27:50] The importance of participatory design in trauma-informed design.

[28:02] Defining participatory design.

[29:22] How Sarah applies participatory design to her own work.

[31:47] One question Sarah reflects on when she thinks about design work.

[34:10] The struggle designers often have in finding ways to compensate participants.

[35:53] Non-monetary participant compensation options that Sarah has used in the past.

[36:57] Asking the community what they want and need when it comes to compensation.

[38:08] Things Sarah wishes would be part of teaching design.

[43:10] Designer mindsets.

[46:07] Books and resources Sarah recommends.

[48:25] How to learn more about Sarah and her work.

[50:05] Fluid Hive?s resources for those wanting to learn and practice design thinking.

 

Links

Sarah?s Website

Sarah on Twitter

Sarah on Medium

Sarah on Instagram

Sarah?s profile on Women Talk Design

Conversations on Design: Design Research with Sarah Fathallah

The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma, by Bessel van der Kolk

Companion to Feminist Studies, by Nancy A. Naples

Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need (Information Policy), by Sasha Costanza-Chock

Research as Resistance: Revisiting Critical, Indigenous, and Anti-Oppressive Approaches, by Leslie Brown and Susan Strega

Design in Crisis: New Worlds, Philosophies, and Practices, edited by Tony Fry and Adam Nocek

Modernity + Coloniality

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Design Thinking for the Public Sector + Building and Training Design Thinking Teams with Stephanie Wade ? DT101 E14

Designer's Role in Healthcare & Public Health + Studio Thinking with Jess Roberts ? DT101 E21

Design for Mental Health: Creating an Effective Response to Student Loneliness with Denise Ho and Andrew Baker ? DT101 E60

 

Other Resources

Download Fluid Hive's Innovation Shield ? a guide to avoiding innovation traps by asking 9 of Fluid Hive's Design Thinking Questions

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Learn to Ask Like a Designer and take your innovation projects from frantic to focused by working smart from the start.

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills ? people who want to think and solve like a designer.

2021-06-24
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Experiencing Design: The Innovator's Journey with Karen Hold ? DT101 E71

This is the first DT101 Books episode. Karen Hold joins us on the show to talk about Experiencing Design: The Innovator?s Journey, a book she co-authored with Jeanne Liedtka and Jessica Eldridge.

In DT101 Books episodes, authors explore why their book exists and what it will help you do. Each book is chosen because it has something that will help you think and solve like a designer as you learn, lead and apply design thinking. 

Our Guest and Her Co-Authors

Jeanne Liedtka is a faculty member at the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration at the University of Virginia. Her Columbia Business School Publishing books include Designing for Growth: A Manager?s Toolkit (2011) and Design Thinking for the Greater Good: Innovation in the Social Sector (2017).

Karen Hold is the founder of Experience Labs, an innovation consulting firm. She is also the director of DT:DC, a design thinking community in Washington, DC, and a visiting professor at École des Ponts Business School in Paris, France.

Jessica Eldridge is a consultant working at the intersection of educational equity and purposeful innovation. She is a specialist in design thinking, innovation management, and cross-sector collaboration.

 

About Experiencing Design: The Innovator?s Journey

In daylong hackathons, design thinking seems deceptively easy. On the surface, it involves a set of seemingly simple activities such as gathering data, identifying insights, generating ideas, prototyping, and experimentation. But practiced at a superficial level, even great design tools don?t go deep enough to create the shifts in mindset and skill set that are required to achieve transformational impact. 

Going deep with design requires more than changing the activities of innovators; it involves creating the conditions that shape who they become. Individuals become design thinkers by experiencing design.

Drawing on decades of researching and teaching design thinking to people not trained in design, Jeanne Liedtka, Karen Hold, and Jessica Eldridge offer a guide for how to create these deep experiences at each stage of the design thinking journey, whether for an individual, a team, or an organization. 

For each experience phase, they specify the mindset shifts and competencies that need to be achieved, describe how different personality types experience different kinds of journeys, and show how to fully leverage the diversity of teams. Experiencing Design explores both the science and practicalities of design and includes two assessment instruments for individual and organizational development.

Ultimately, innovators need to be someone new to create something new. This book shows you how to use design thinking to make this happen.

 

Show Highlights

[00:56] Dawan muses on trying to come up with a name for the podcast book episodes.

[01:06] Michael Silverblatt as the one and only Bookworm.

[02:07] Karen talks about the ideas and discussions that started the book-writing process.

[02:51] Igniting the design spark (or not!) in the people she works with.

[04:57] The book is for those already familiar with, and using, design thinking.

[06:05] It?s intended to help design thinking users deepen their practice.

[07:25] Different personality types experience design and design thinking differently.

[08:11] Karen, Jeanne, and Jessica developed four Innovator Personalities.

[08:20] You have to become someone new to make something new.

[08:54] Karen gives an example from her time on the brand team at Folgers during the rise of Starbucks.

[10:15] Quantitative versus qualitative research.

[10:48] Biases in decision making.

[13:47] Insights and sensemaking occurs gradually and purposefully.

[15:04] Sensemaking involves learning from perspectives that are not our own.

[18:00] The book provides a set of Minimum Viable Competencies (MVCs) ? behaviors and indicators that help designers gauge skill and mindset improvement.

[19:00] Karen discusses some of the MVCs found in the book.

[20:00] Observation versus interpretation.

[21:33] Double-loop learning.

[22:00] Becoming too attached to one point of view and closing off.

[23:16] MVCs are skills that people can improve with time, training, and use.

[24:47] The book offers the reader an entire section on creating a personal development plan

[26:45] A digital tool to help readers develop their plan is in beta-test and will be available soon.

[28:13] The development plan process also works for teams within an organization.

[30:30] Some of the surprises that appeared during the writing journey.

[30:43] The tale of how the title of the book changed at the last minute.

[35:12] Karen talks about working with her co-authors, and her shift from learner to sharer.

[36:58] Missing the daily learning that happened during the writing of the book.

[38:14] The intense focus that happened during, and even because of, the pandemic.

[38:54] The shift to working virtually.

[40:03] The science behind the ?A-ha! moment.?

[41:55] Why Karen makes sure that her workshops now have an overnight in between activities.

[42:45] The difference between ordinary and expert intuition.

[44:03] The hope Karen has for those who read the book.

[46:00] Fluid Hive?s resources for those wanting to learn and practice design thinking.

 

Links

Order your copy of Experiencing Design

 

Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

From Branding to Design + Teaching Design Teams + Leading Summer of Design with Karen Hold ? DT101E13

Designing for the Greater Good, Strategy + Design Thinking, and Measuring Design Thinking with Jeanne Liedtka ? DT101 E1 Design Thinking at Work + Three Tensions Designers Navigate with David Dunne ? DT101 E23

 

Fluid Hive Resources

Download Fluid Hive's Innovation Shield ? a guide to avoiding innovation traps by asking 9 of Fluid Hive's Design Thinking Questions

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Learn new ways to Ask Like a Designer and take your innovation projects from frantic to focused by working smart from the start.

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills ? people who want to think and solve like a designer.

2021-06-08
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Identity Design + People vs. Process + Intersectional Design Leadership with John B. Johnson ? DT101 E70

John B. Johnson is an identity architect and principal of A Small Studio. He works with corporations and scaling startups, using A Small Studio?s identity design framework. John and his team also work with creatives to bring peace to people's lives. Today, John and I talk about corporate and individual identity design, why people are more important than process, and intersectional design leadership.

 

Listen to learn about:

Defining identity Identity design The intersection of brand/identity and authentic design

 

Our Guest?s Bio

John B. Johnson is a brother, a son, a husband, a friend, and the founder, principal, and Identity Architect of a small studio. a small studio is a collective of creatives who use their design gifts to improve lives through branding and product design. They believe every design project starts with Identity. In less than 3 years, his team has built over 40 brands worldwide. John leverages his Master?s Degrees in Architecture and Business Administration to help people, start-ups, and enterprises benefit from infusing their identity into the work they do and what they offer the people they serve.

 

Show Highlights 

[01:20] John talks about his path into the work he?s doing today in identity design.

[01:39] Design thinking is a core principle of architecture.

[03:06] John?s fascination with the people in the built environment and designing buildings with an eye towards the human interactions occurring there, and how that led him away from architecture.

[03:34] Leaving architecture behind to focus more on community and the human equation.

[04:45] Lessons learned during John?s first startup business.

[05:25] John discovers his passion for branding.

[06:10] John?s co-founding of a small studio, and a move to Seattle.

[07:43] Authentic design and how it feeds into brand and identity design.

[08:39] John defines identity.

[08:49] What happens during the branding process.

[10:39] The importance of frameworks and processes for John?s work.

[12:28] John uses deeply personal stories and moments to help build powerful visual identities for clients.

[12:59] a small studio?s Identity Architecture workshop ? for individuals, teams, and corporations.

[15:25] Moving fully into remote work during the pandemic.

[17:24] The challenges of building a business.

[18:46] Time is a key factor when it comes to going virtual.

[19:55] The benefits that have come from folks needing to work remotely.

[21:35] Remote work has sparked creativity and innovation in ways we?ve never experienced before.

[22:36] Working remotely has led to more acceptance of the humanity of one another.

[26:00] John talks about his life and experiences being a Black man and a Black designer.

[28:27] His experiences being the only Black person in his education and work spaces and the unique way of seeing the world that came because of it.

[29:47] How his life has motivated him to be a connector and a bridge between people and communities.

[31:51] Intersectionality is the ethos of design and design thinking.

[33:55] Dawan and John talk about bringing what is unique to us as individuals more deeply into our professional and personal lives, especially as a designer.

[36:11] Bringing your full, whole self to every situation.

[39:10] ?Constant becoming,? and intentionally designing a good life.

[41:47] Where to find out more about John and his work.

[42:45] Books and resources John recommends.

 

Links

John on LinkedIn

John on Twitter

John on Medium

John on Instagram

John?s personal website

A Small Studio

Everything Starts Small podcast

Design Thinking Isn?t Just for the Privileged

Brighton Jones Talent for Good Interview Series: John B. Johnson

Book Recommendation: Community: The Structure of Belonging, by Peter Block

Book Recommendation: The Artist?s Way, by Julia Cameron

Book Recommendation: A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life?s Purpose, by Eckhart Tolle

 

Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

From Branding to Design + Teaching Design Teams + Leading Summer of Design with Karen Hold ? DT101E13

Redesigning a Design School + Designing Higher Ed with Jason Schupbach ? DT101 E30

Rethinking Service Design + Student Projects + Community Systems with Amy O?Keefe ? DT101 E56

 

Fluid Hive Resources

Download Fluid Hive's Innovation Shield ? a guide to avoiding innovation traps by asking 9 of Fluid Hive's Design Thinking Questions

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Learn new ways to Ask Like a Designer and take your innovation projects from frantic to focused by working smart from the start.

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills ? people who want to think and solve like a designer.

2021-05-25
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The Swiss-Army Lives of How-Might-We Questions // ALD 005 ? DT101 E69

Thank you for listening to this Ask Like a Designer episode of the Design Thinking 101 Podcast.

This episode is about how to use ?How might we ?? questions to anchor your innovation projects, align your team, and adjust the problem you are trying to solve as you learn.

This episode is based on this article: ALD 005 // The Swiss-Army Lives of How-Might-We Questions. Read the article and others like it on Fluid Hive?s Ask Like a Designer.

In these short Ask Like a Designer episodes on the Design Thinking 101 podcast, you?ll find new ways to explore the show?s stories and ideas about design-driven innovation. I?ll share methods, templates, and ideas that have worked in my practice in teaching. 

What did you think of this episode? Please send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team.

 Cheers ~ Dawan

Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host

President, Fluid Hive

 

Show Highlights

[00:58] The One Question to rule them all: what problem are you trying to solve?

[01:15] Finding the right problem to solve is the key to great innovation work.

[01:32] What do you do with your answer to the question?

[01:47] The purpose of ?How might we?? questions.

[02:17] The three required parts of a ?How might we?? question.

[02:27] The two optional parts of a ?How might we?? question.

[03:48] Ways ?How might we?? questions can help a designer or design team.

[04:16] What is reframing, and how does it relate to innovation work?

[05:07] ?How might we?? questions also help those who are not on the team, but who are providing knowledge, insights, or assistance in some way.

[05:44] Having clear goals is important when doing innovation work.

[06:27] ?How might we?? questions help guide team conversations about the work.

[06:43] ?How might we?? questions also act as a guidepost.

[07:30] We want questions that create possibilities for many workable solutions.

[07:59] Free Ask Like a Designer tool to help you create your own ?How might we?? questions.

[08:31] Design Thinking 101 Learning courses.

[08:52] The Innovation Smart Start webinar.

 

Design Thinking 101 Learning ? Courses and More

Design Thinking 101 Learning helps people learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation. Each training course focuses on a different collection of actions and skills critical to using design thinking effectively and getting the results you seek.

Please join me in the first course, Design Thinking 101 ? Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve.

Each course is structured to help your innovation actions create what you need for the people you serve, your organization and yourself.

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Ask Like a Designer ? DT101 E61

Design, and One Question to Rule Them All // ALD 002 ? DT101 E63

There Are No Problems Worth Solving ? Only Questions Worth Asking // ALD 003 ? DT101 E65

Your Good-Life OS: Designing a System for Living Well and Peak Performance // ALD 004 ? DT101 E67

 

Other Resources

Download Fluid Hive's Innovation Shield ? a guide to avoiding innovation traps by asking 9 of Fluid Hive's Design Thinking Questions

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Learn to Ask Like a Designer and take your innovation projects from frantic to focused by working smart from the start.

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills ? people who want to think and solve like a designer.

2021-05-11
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Democracy as a Design Problem with Whitney Quesenbery ? DT101 E68

Designing Elections? Yes! Whitney Quesenbery and I talk about designing elections, designing in government, and the future of election design. We dive deep into the world of elections, and Whitney?s and the Center for Civic Design?s work to help election officials nationwide design better elections.

 

Show Summary

Whitney had two careers before she landed in civic design. She had a professional career in theatre for a number of years before a friend asked her to write a product manual. That led to a shift into writing, and she worked for a number of large organizations creating and documenting content. In 2000, Whitney ended up on a federal advisory committee writing voting system standards, which led her into civic design and to what she calls her ?last great adventure? founding the Center for Civic Design. 

Listen to learn about:

Using design in elections Designing with government and election officials The Center for Civic Design?s work The evolution of election design The 2016 and 2020 elections and how they are shaping the future of election design Ways local leaders can get more involved in election design


Our Guest?s Bio

Whitney Quesenbery is the director of the Center for Civic Design, solving democracy as a design problem and improving the voter experience. She combines a fascination with people and an obsession to communicate clearly with her goal of usable accessibility for all. She's written 3 books ? A Web for Everyone: Designing accessible user experiences, Storytelling for User Experience, and Global UX ? to help practitioners keep users in mind throughout the creative process.

 

Show Highlights

[01:32] Whitney talks about her three careers.

[04:12] Whitney?s co-founding of the Center for Civic Design.

[05:37] The challenge of applying the methods of design to elections.

[07:00] Government election workers don?t tend to see themselves as designers.

[08:19] How to bring non-designers comfortably into design work.

[08:42] Whitney talks about the Center?s founding project in California designing voter guides.

[11:24] The importance of public review and iteration to the success of the project.

[13:55] How Whitney?s work has evolved over the years.

[14:35] Ways the Center changed its user research to ensure diversity.

[16:14] Collaborating with other organizations.

[17:26] Whitney talks about the 2020 election and the future of the Center?s work.

[18:52] The Center?s work on mail-in voting before and after the election.

[20:53] The importance of street-level bureaucrats in the running of elections.

[22:22] How ordinary Americans showed up and volunteered to help run the 2020 election: registering voters, poll workers, ballot counters, etc.

[23:34] Whitney talks about designing in ways to encourage volunteerism in elections.

[24:45] The ?public square? concept in elections.

[25:08] Whitney shares one story as an example of the ways information (and misinformation) can affect elections and how people vote.

[27:48] Opportunities for local leaders to help design elections.

[28:11] The importance of the day-to-day, ?everyday? work and effort.

[31:44] Service design and the ?gentle disruption? part of Whitney?s work.

[34:58] Whitney offers advice and encouragement for local election officials thinking about working with a designer.

[35:31] The Center?s Field Guides to Ensuring Voter Intent.

[37:23] More about the Center?s work.

[38:03] The Center?s online Election Design course at the University of Minnesota.

[39:53] The difference between Big D Design and little d design.

[40:14] Whitney talks about a project for the Department of Health and Human Services.

[42:55] How the Center is building a team with the right skills.

[45:03] The future of the Center for Civic Design.

[48:45] Resources for people interested in civic design, civic tech, and election design.

[53:03] Where to find out more about Whitney and the Center for Civic Design.

[53:16] The Center for Civic Design?s Irregulars List

[54:09] Ways you can support the Center for Civic Design?s work.

 

Links

Whitney on LinkedIn

Whitney on Twitter

Whitney on Women Talk Design

Whitney on UX Matters

Whitney?s personal website

Whitney?s presentations on Slideshare

Center for Civic Design and their 2020 Annual Report

Center for Civic Design on Twitter

Election design course, online, at Election Academy!

Field Guides to Ensuring Voter Intent from the Center for Civic Design 

An invitation to redistricting

Designing ballot cure forms that invite voters to act

Minnesota gets new polling place signage with help from design students

ElectionTools.org

UX Magazine: Book Excerpt: A Web for Everyone, by Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery

Accessible Elections: Are we there yet?

STC Summit Interview with Whitney

Designing our civic life: can paying taxes be delightful?

Design as a Civic Responsibility

Whitney Quesenbery with Tala Schlossberg, NY Times (October 29, 2020): Good design is the secret to better democracy (Ballots are broken. We redesigned them.)

ConveyUX: Writing great persona stories

ConveyUX: Content for Everyone: Making information accessible

18F Blog: Delivering civic technology

Book Recommendation: A Web for Everyone: Designing Accessible User Experiences, by Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery

Book Recommendation: Storytelling for User Experience: Crafting Stories for Better Design, by Whitney Quesenbery and Kevin Brooks

Book Recommendation: Global UX: Design and Research in a Connected World, by Whitney Quesenbery and Daniel Szuc

Book Recommendation: A Civic Technologist?s Practice Guide, by Cyd Harrell

Center for Civic Design Irregulars List: when we need extra help on a project, from running flash usability tests to collecting data on local election information, we turn to our extended community: Join the list

So you want to serve your country: A (biased) guide to tech jobs in federal government

 

Support the Center for Civic Design

Donations to support our work are gratefully accepted and are tax deductible. We accept donations:

 

Through PayPal as

[email protected]

By mail at

5443 Tates Bank Road

Cambridge, MD 21613

 

You can also sign up to support us at

Amazon Smile

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

A Short Introduction to Design Thinking with Dawan Stanford ? DT101 E32 Civic Design + Innovation Ops + System Design with Ryann Hoffman ? DT101 E62 Design, and One Question to Rule Them All // ALD 002 ? DT101 E63

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2021-04-27
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Your Good-Life OS: Designing a System for Living Well and Peak Performance // ALD 004 ? DT101 E67

Thank you for listening to this Ask Like a Designer episode of the Design Thinking 101 Podcast.

In my coaching conversations, I help people take a more holistic view of life and work. We find experiments that define values, shape goals and establish habits. This episode is about running your own experiments using our system for high performance with living well at its core ? Fluid Hive?s Good-Life Operating System. 

In these short Ask Like a Designer episodes on the Design Thinking 101 podcast, you?ll find new ways to explore the show?s stories and ideas about design-driven innovation. I?ll share methods, templates, and ideas that have worked in my practice in teaching.

This episode is based on this article: ALD 004 // Your Good-Life OS: Designing a System for Living Well and Peak Performance. Read the article and others like it on Fluid Hive?s Ask Like a Designer.

What did you think of this episode? Please send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team.

Cheers ~ Dawan

Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host

President, Fluid Hive

 

Show Highlights

[00:51] You can use design thinking to help you create your system for living well.

[01:03] Living well is the foundation of high performance.

[01:52] What?s your purpose?

[02:13] The three questions we all need to answer to create the Good-Life Operating System.

[02:54] Efficiency procrastination.

[03:22] Researching habit formation.

[04:19] Incorporating the variables of time and change into goal-setting.

[04:54] Binary measurements for goal outcomes tracking.

[06:05] Secular Goals vs. Value Goals.

[07:19] Using ?I am someone who?? to establish value goals.

[08:07] Three obstacles to the Good-Life OS.

[09:45] The benefit of regular Life Scans.

[10:40] How to set up your own Life Scan.

[11:17] Bringing it all together to get your Good-Life OS up and running.

[12:21] Free Ask Like a Designer Thinking Tool to help you create your GoodLife OS.

[12:59] Design Thinking 101 Learning courses.

[13:29] The Innovation SmartStart webinar.

 

Design Thinking 101 Learning ? Courses and More

Design Thinking 101 Learning helps people learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation. Each training course focuses on a different collection of actions and skills critical to using design thinking effectively and getting the results you seek.

Please join me in the first course, Design Thinking 101 ? Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve

Each course is structured to help your innovation actions create what you need for the people you serve, your organization and yourself.

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Design Thinking 101 Podcast Episode 61: Ask Like a Designer Episode 001

Design Thinking 101 Podcast Episode 63: Ask Like a Designer Episode 002

Design Thinking 101 Podcast Episode 65: Ask Like a Designer Episode 003

 

Other Resources

Download the Design-Driven Innovation Project Launch Guide ? Guide to launching innovation projects and avoiding common innovation traps Design-Driven Innovation.

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills.

 

2021-04-13
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Learning Service Design + Leading Service Transformation with Clive Grinyer ? DT101 E66

Clive Grinyer is the Head of Service Design at the Royal College of Art in London. Clive's an acknowledged expert in service design, design thinking, and design and technology innovation, who has led award-winning design teams for companies around the globe. He started in design consultancy with IDEO in London and San Francisco before co-founding the design consultancy company Tangerine with Martin Derbyshire and future Apple design chief and RCA chancellor, Jony Ive.

He went on to build and lead design teams for Orange, Samsung, and Cisco, and was Director of Service Design for Barclays. As Director of Design of the UK?s Design Council, he created the Design Demand program, taking design into over one thousand UK companies. As a consultant, he?s worked with the cabinet office policy lab and at Nesta. Clive speaks at national and international conferences, writes articles and blogs, and has published Smart Design, a book on design and technology.

 

Show Summary

Clive discovered his interest in design at an early age, in part thanks to toys and dresses! His grandmother?s dress shop introduced him to the idea that there were actual people out there whose job was making decisions about what we would like and what would be trendy. That would lead him to art school. A conversation with a career advisor uncovered an affinity for product design, and that?s where Clive?s design path began: designing physical objects.

He worked for several well-known design consultancies, including Moggridge Associates (founded by Bill Moggridge, who would go on to co-found IDEO), and then Clive chose to co-found a design consultancy himself before shifting gears away from consulting altogether and going in-house, taking a position with Samsung, where he helped open the company?s design office in Europe. After Samsung, Clive worked for a number of the world?s leading corporations, culminating in a position with Barclays bank, where he again shifted--this time from digital design to service design--setting up their service design team and working on customer experience.

Clive recently left the corporate world behind, taking the Head of Service Design position at the RCA not long before the COVID-19 pandemic began. Today, we?ll talk about building service design teams, teaching service design and how the RCA service design department adapted its teaching and courses in response to the pandemic, and where Clive believes service design needs to take us in the future.

 

Listen in to learn more about:

Clive?s path from product design to service design Building a service design team Service design at RCA The future of service design, post-pandemic Service design in Europe and the US How the impact of service design is often invisible Service design, design thinking, and innovation

 

Show Highlights

[02:01] Clive talks about his design career path.

[07:50] Moving from consulting to in-house.

[09:54] Leaving the corporate world behind for the RCA.

[10:41] Challenges Clive faced while building the service design team at Barclays.

[13:02] Finding the right people for the team.

[13:34] Design Council?s double diamond.

[14:40] The Barclays team?s first project.

[17:47] Culture change as a vital function of a service designer.

[19:08] Taking people on a journey, and passing on the tools of design to others.

[22:26] Teaching service design at the RCA in the midst of the pandemic.

[23:02] Ramping up the use of digital tools and going online.

[24:20] The success of RCA?s graduate virtual service design show.

[25:54] Taking the lessons from the last year and using them going forward.

[26:38] Clive talks about a successful project conducting user research online via TikTok.

[27:30] Post-pandemic opportunities for service design.

[27:40] Generation Regeneration.

[27:56] ?Never waste a crisis.?

[30:23] How service design can help us make decisions to build the future we want.

[31:51] Clive and Dawan talk about the state of service design in the U.S.

[33:49] The focus of design thinking in the U.S.

[34:04] The impact of service design in Europe.

[35:23] Service design is fixing things.

[36:42] The ?invisible impact? of service design.

[38:28] The role of service design and design thinking in innovation.

[41:03] Clive offers advice to those wanting to try service design at their organization.

[42:03] Thinking differently.

[45:41] Clive talks about the two-year master?s at RCA.

[48:16] More about RCA?s service design tutors.

[51:41] The importance of storytelling to service design.

[53:18] The big challenge Clive sees for service designers.

[55:06] Where to find out more about Clive and his work.

  

Links

Clive?s website

Clive on LinkedIn

Clive on Twitter

Clive?s profile on the Royal College of Art website

RCA Service Design

Ageing Well: Designing a world accessible to all

Creative Review?s Top 50 for 2018

Designing Our Futures

Clive Grinyer on Service Design
CLG Podcast: Public services are ahead of business when it comes to service design
Unknown Origins podcast: Clive Grinyer on Service Design

  

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Integrating Engineering, Design and Business with Tony Hu ? DT101 E35

Teaching and Learning Service Design for Designers and Non-designers with Maurício Manhães ? DT101 E34

Rethinking Service Design + Student Projects + Community Systems with Amy O?Keefe ? DT101 E56

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Ready to learn new ways to think and solve like a designer today? Enroll in Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve ? from Fluid Hive?s Design Thinking 101 Learning.

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2021-03-30
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There Are No Problems Worth Solving ? Only Questions Worth Asking // ALD 003 ? DT101 E65

This episode is based on this article: ALD 003 // There Are No Problems Worth Solving ? Only Questions Worth Asking. Read the article and others like it on Fluid Hive?s Ask Like a Designer.

 

This Ask Like a Designer episode is about a better way to see and choose problems to solve. It includes a simple framework for aligning your choices with the development and goals that matter most to you.

 

In these short Ask Like a Designer episodes on the Design Thinking 101 podcast, you?ll find new ways to explore the show?s stories and ideas about design-driven innovation. I?ll share methods, templates, and ideas that have worked in my practice in teaching. 

 

What did you think of this episode? Please send your questions, suggestions and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team.

 

Cheers ~ Dawan

Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host

President, Fluid Hive

 

Show Highlights

[00:52] A better approach to closing the gaps between the world we have and the world we want.

[01:07] Questions worth asking.

[01:21] The trouble with solving.

[01:54] Responding instead of solving.

[02:23] Difference between response and reaction.

[02:44] Looking at problems and how questions can create the problem space.

[03:37] Questions worth answering.

[04:28] Wicked problems.

[04:54] Questions worth answering by you.

[05:11] Four considerations when deciding if a question is worth answering by you.

[05:25] Learning.

[05:39] Power-Ups.

[05:58] Seedlings.

[06:18] The Spend.

[07:33] Free Ask Like a Designer Thinking Tool to help you choose your next question worth answering.

[08:21] Design Thinking 101 Learning courses.

[08:47] The Innovation SmartStart webinar.

 

Design Thinking 101 Learning ? Courses and More

Design Thinking 101 Learning helps people learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation. Each training course focuses on a different collection of actions and skills critical to using design thinking effectively and getting the results you seek.

 

Please join me in the first course, Design Thinking 101 ? Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve

 

Each course is structured to help your innovation actions create what you need for the people you serve, your organization and yourself.

 

Fluid Hive?s Designing Facilitation Course launches soon. Get notified when enrollment opens.

Good events are essential when creating effective solutions while thinking and acting like a designer. Designing Facilitation shows you how to create effective, engaging events that are easy to lead. You?ll learn how to apply the Event Design Questions, use over 20 event creation tools, how to avoid common facilitation traps, and make the most of every second people spend at your events.

Notify me when Designing Facilitation launches!

 

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Ask Like a Designer 001 ? DT101 E61

Design, and One Question to Rule Them All // ALD 002 ? DT101 E63

 

Other Resources

Download the Design-Driven Innovation Project Launch Guide ? Guide to launching innovation projects and avoiding common innovation traps Design-Driven Innovation.

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills.

2021-03-18
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Micro Course: How to Conduct Listening Sessions with Indi Young ? DT101 E64

In this episode, Indi Young joins me to deliver a micro-course on listening sessions. I?m experimenting with new ways to learn on the podcast. 

Listeners will learn from Indi as we talk about listening sessions, what they are, how to do them, why they matter, and how to get the most out of them. 

Let me know what you think of the micro-course format, and if I should do more of them. 

Cheers,

Dawan, Your Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host

 

 Listen to learn more about:

What listening sessions are and why they matter How to structure a good listening session Getting the most out of listening sessions The two questions that are always asked during a listening session Do?s and Don?ts of listening sessions

 

Our Guest?s Bio

Indi Young is a researcher who coaches, writes, and teaches about inclusive product strategy. Her work is rooted in the problem space where the focus is on people, not users. Indi pioneered opportunity, maps, mental model diagrams, and thinking styles. She was one of the founders of Adaptive Path, the pioneering user experience agency. Her way of approaching the problem allows teams to truly pay attention to people without letting cognitive bias and assumptions creep in. She has written two books, Practical Empathy, and Mental Models, and is working on a third, Assumptions Aside, which will cover thinking styles. Indi builds knowledge and community via a series of online advanced courses about design research and the importance of pushing the boundaries of your perspective.

  

Show Highlights

[02:54] Listening is different from interviewing.

[03:22] Listening is qualitative research.

[04:35] Indi describes the knowledge creation / data collection template she uses.

[05:05] Problem spaces and solution spaces.

[06:57] In the solution space, much of the research is either generative or evaluative.

[08:07] In the problem space, the research is neither generative nor evaluative.

[08:54] The problem space is interested in the person and how they achieve their purpose.

[09:19] A listening session asks the person what they were thinking as they were achieving their purpose.

[11:25] Organizations are often only concerned with solution spaces; problem spaces tend to get ignored.

[12:03] Why study problem spaces?

[12:56] One solution does not fit all ? there is no such thing as an ?average user.?

[13:50] Thinking styles vs. personas, and designing for archetypes.

[15:03] An example from work Indi did for the University of Buffalo.

[15:33] The benefits of using thinking styles over personas.

[16:25] The bias problem in research.

[17:10] Listening sessions must be framed by a purpose, and must have depth.

[17:39] Surface vs. depth.

[18:59] Depth is how we develop cognitive empathy with people.

[19:34] The good stuff in a listening session is the inner thinking, the emotional reactions.

[21:13] Indi describes the Mental Model Diagram.

[23:27] Listening sessions start with a germinal question.

[24:28] Listening sessions are audio-only.

[26:49] The challenges that can come up in listening sessions.

[28:47] The structure of a listening session.

[30:27] Indi shares snippets of some listening sessions as examples of how to begin a listening session.

[34:37] How Indi works with the results of a listening session.

[35:14] Techniques used during listening sessions.

[36:13] Listening session examples demonstrating techniques Listeners can use to build trust and rapport with the Speaker.

[38:05] The importance of silence.

[41:29] Listening session examples demonstrating how to encourage Speakers to open up and share their inner thoughts and emotions.

[45:38] Indi talks about micro-reflections and shares some examples from listening sessions.

[49:57] Why Indi likes the word ?because.?

[50:43] Listening session examples where the Listeners used time and place to help the Speakers dig deeper.

[Note from Indi at 51:44] - ?I forgot to explain that the grocery store example was because the Speaker got flustered and forgot her restaurant experiences. The Listener took her back to the grocery store she had mentioned so that the Speaker could be in familiar territory and relax. After that she remembered some more of her restaurant experiences.?

[55:34] Indi talks about ways to simply encourage Speakers to continue talking.

[57:12] Things not to do during listening sessions.

[57:18] Avoid asking leading questions.

[58:37] Avoid asking surface level questions.

[1:01:08] Avoid conjecture.

[1:01:51] Examples of conjecture from Indi?s listening sessions.

[1:08:32] Avoiding complex reflection.

[1:10:33] Indi talks about normal things that can occur during listening sessions.

[1:12:13] Discovering your own verbal habits when reviewing your listening sessions.

[1:13:35] Winding down listening sessions, and some examples of that from Indi.

[1:13:53] The one closing question you should always ask.

[1:16:40] Indi offers advice to those wanting to improve their listening skills and perhaps try using listening sessions.

[1:19:44] Indi talks about some of the courses she offers.

  

Links

Here are the diagrams and transcripts we discuss in the episode.

Indi on Twitter

Indi on LinkedIn

Indi on Medium

Indi?s website and course listings

99% Invisible podcast episode: On Average

Book Recommendation: Listening Well: The Art of Empathic Understanding, by William Miller

Be sure to check out the links from Indi?s other DT 101 Podcast episode, linked below!

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Problem Spaces, Understanding How People Think, and Practical Empathy with Indi Young ? DT101 E6

2021-03-02
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Design, and One Question to Rule Them All // ALD 002 ? DT101 E63

I hope you enjoyed this episode.

 

In these short Ask Like a Designer episodes on the Design Thinking 101 podcast, you?ll find new ways to explore the show?s stories and ideas about design-driven innovation. I'll share methods, templates, and ideas that have worked in my practice in teaching.

 

This episode is about a question behind almost everything people do as they create growth and opportunity by seeing and solving like a designer.

 

This episode is based on this article: ALD 002 // Design, and One Question to Rule Them All. Read the article and others like it on Fluid Hive?s Ask Like a Designer.

 

What did you think of this episode? Please send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team.

 

Cheers ~ Dawan
Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host
President, Fluid Hive

Show Highlights

[00:50] The One Question to Rule Them All.

[01:19] Solving the wrong problem.

[01:41] What happens when you solve the wrong problem.

[01:49] Why solving the right problem is actually impossible.

[02:31] Lessons from a yacht crash.

[03:10] What problem am I trying to solve is never ?one and done.?

[04:23] How do you find the answer to ?what problem am I trying to solve?? 

[04:34] How-Might-We questions

[04:45] Free Ask Like a Designer tool to help you choose your next problem to solve.

[05:08] To design is to ask questions.

[05:27] Design Thinking 101 Learning courses.

[05:52] The Innovation Smart Start webinar.

Design Thinking 101 Learning ? Courses and More

Design Thinking 101 Learning helps people start seeing and solving like a designer. Each training course focuses on a different collection of actions and skills critical to using design thinking effectively and getting the results you seek.

Please join me in the first course, Design Thinking 101 ? Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve

Each course is structured to help your innovation actions create what you need for the people you serve, your organization and yourself.

Grab your spot and start seeing and solving like a designer today.

 

Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Ask Like a Designer 001 ? DT101 E61

A Short Introduction to Design Thinking with Dawan Stanford ? DT101 E32 

Design Research + Tools for Thinking + Using Research Well with Terri Herbert ? DT101 E55

 

Other Resources

Download the Design-Driven Innovation Project Launch Guide ? Guide to launching innovation projects and avoiding common innovation traps Design-Driven Innovation.

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills.

2021-02-18
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Civic Design + Innovation Ops + System Design with Ryann Hoffman ? DT101 E62

Ryann Hoffman is a system designer and design leader specializing in design and complex systems and working with organizations to develop capacity in design thinking and innovation operations.

 

Show Summary

Ryann?s path into design came from an early love of music, playing classical piano, and music composition. She did freelance design projects for teachers while in high school. By the time she went to college, she had strong design and communication skills, and had learned the power of storytelling. Ryann started out with plans for a degree in English, but switched to Sociology and fell in love with it from her very first introductory course.

After undergrad, she spent several years working in various fields, including nonprofits and a music tech startup, where she brought her digital communications and design skills to bear on projects like promotional videos, visual design for reports and collaterals, and systems design for music distribution.

 

While in grad school for Public Administration, she took a class called ?Coping with Wicked Problems,? where she was introduced to design thinking. After graduation, she moved to Washington, D.C. became a member of Design Thinking DC, and started what would become her career in systems design, leading to her civic design work today with cities across America and international organizations like The World Bank and the Government of Madagascar.

 

Listen in to learn about:

      Design Thinking D.C.

      System design at the municipal and federal level

      Advice for launching a new design team

      The surprising way ?tedium? can trip up a design project

      Innovation Transformation

      Helping design teams that are working with emotional, difficult topics

      Power and identity in design

      Post-traumatic growth and helping people find a path to it in positive ways

      The importance of designers learning facilitation

 

Our Guest?s Bio

Ryann Hoffman is a systems designer most in flow working in complex problem spaces.

She's built and led design work across industries and at organizations including The World Bank and The Government of Madagascar, Capital One, Johns Hopkins Sibley Memorial Hospital, and ConsenSys. Through leading and practicing design, Ryann found purpose in developing teams. She watched the most well-intentioned, competent teams struggle to create impact because they lacked the support and curriculum to imbue design beyond densely packed workshops or sprints, and into their daily workflows, collaborations, and mindsets. As a Design Coach and Instructor, Ryann has worked with Harvard University and the Bloomberg Foundation, AmeriCorps, ConsenSys, Sunrun, and other leading institutions leveraging design to make their respective dents in the world's challenges.

Her circuitous route to this calling includes her Masters in Public Administration, a stint in the music industry, and an early foundation in digital media production and visual design. When she's not working, Ryann loves learning about the brain and aspires to be more mindful.

 

Show Highlights

[02:05] How Ryann?s love of music led her to develop digital design and communications skills.

[03:57] Making the switch from English literature to Sociology.

[05:14] Ryann?s post-undergrad work.

[08:05] The graduate course on dealing with wicked problems that introduced Ryann to design thinking.

[11:38] Moving to Washington, D.C. after graduation.

[13:22] Ryann and Dawan talk about Design Thinking D.C.

[17:44] Ryann talks about her work as a civic designer and facilitator.

[19:48] What Ryann loves about working at the city level of design.

[23:17] How working with cities helps designers build a varied and robust skillset.

[25:30] How Ryann helps design teams learn and apply design thinking tools and methods in their work.

[28:18] Ryann offers advice for getting a new design team off to a good start.

[29:40] The area that is often overlooked by new design teams and organizations looking to innovate.

[32:24] Innovation transformation and the 3 things critical for a design team to learn if they want to succeed.

[34:23] On the need for organizations to not be afraid to try different methods and processes to see what works best.

[36:06] One of the most difficult challenges for leaders when they start working with design thinking.

[37:24] How power and identity can create challenges in design thinking work.

[38:57] Ryann talks about early struggles with perfectionism.

[39:36] Divergent and convergent thinking, and the importance of working with and supporting team members.

[42:13] Why trust is so important for teams and the importance of creative conflict.

[43:29] Ryann?s recent focus on stress on systems and the psychological field of post-traumatic growth.

[46:16] Reframing how we think about the things that cause us harm and stress.

[49:23] Why facilitation is an important skill for designers and anyone working in design thinking.

[56:18] Lessons Ryann learned about remote work.

[57:07] Remote work can make it easier to integrate design into an organization?s workflows.

[58:14] Finding and learning the tools to help create an engaging online experience.

[1:00:06] The difference between remote and in-person interactions.

[1:03:47] Seeing areas of weakness as opportunities.

[1:05:43] Where to find out more about Ryann and her work.

 

Links

 Ryann Hoffman on LinkedIn

Staircase Strategy

Book Recommendation: Antifragile: Things That Gain From Disorder, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Book Recommendation: Stronger By Stress: Adapt to Beneficial Stressors to Improve Your Health and Strengthen the Body, by Siim Land

Psychology Today, ?Why Virtual Communication Can Leave You Worn Out?

Brené Brown, The power of vulnerability

 

 Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Design Thinking for the Public Sector + Building and Training Design Thinking Teams with Stephanie Wade ? DT101 E14

Teaching Yourself Design Thinking + Innovating in Government with Amy J. Wilson ? DT101 E19

Adding System Awareness to System Design to Your Innovation Stack with Julie Guinn ? DT101 E43

More Design Thinking 101 Episodes

 

________________

 Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Download the Design-Driven Innovation Project Launch Guide ? Guide to launching innovation projects and avoiding common innovation traps Design-Driven Innovation.

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills.

 

2021-02-02
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Ask Like a Designer ? DT101 E61

Thank you for listening to this Ask Like a Designer episode of the Design Thinking 101 Podcast.

In these short Ask Like a Designer episodes on the Design Thinking 101 podcast, you?ll find new ways to explore the show?s stories and ideas about design-driven innovation. I'll share methods, templates, and ideas that have worked in my practice in teaching. 

This episode is about six people: six designers whose different roles and favorite questions drive how I serve clients, teach, and develop as a designer.

This episode is based on this article: ALD 001 // Ask Like a Designer. Read the article and others like it on Fluid Hive?s Ask Like a Designer.

What did you think of this episode? Please send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team.

Cheers ~ Dawan
Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host
President, Fluid Hive

Show Highlights

[00:32] What is the Ask Like a Designer series?
[01:08] The Six Designers and their purpose.
[01:44] Why ?ask like a designer??
[02:43] Designer 1: Builder
[03:06] Designer 2: Scout
[03:39] Designer 3: Tinker
[04:19] Designer 4: Facilitator
[04:52] Designer 5: Traveler
[05:14] Designer 6: Pro
[06:01] How to work with the Six Designers
[06:05] Free Ask Like a Designer thinking tool for download at Fluid Hive to help you work with the six designers. 

 

Design Thinking 101 Learning ? Courses and More

Design Thinking 101 Learning helps people learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation. Each training course focuses on a different collection of actions and skills critical to using design thinking effectively and getting the results you seek.

Please join me in the first course, Design Thinking 101 ? Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve

Each course is structured to help your innovation actions create what you need for the people you serve, your organization and yourself.

Grab your spot in the course early. Use this code FRAMING20 to get 20% off the course if you register by January 22, 2021.

 

Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Humble Design Leadership + Design Agency and Experience Design Evolution with Aleksandra Melnikova ? DT101 E33   

A Short Introduction to Design Thinking with Dawan Stanford ? DT101 E32 

Learning and Leading Design for Healthcare + Innovation Teams with Paolo Korre ? DT101 E20 

 

Other Resources

Download the Design-Driven Innovation Project Launch Guide ? Guide to launching innovation projects and avoiding common innovation traps Design-Driven Innovation.

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

Fluid Hive: Learn ? A growing collection of courses, webinars, and articles for people expanding their design thinking, service design, and human-centered design skills.

2021-01-19
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Design for Mental Health: Creating an Effective Response to Student Loneliness with Denise Ho and Andrew Baker ? DT101 E60

Denise Ho and Andrew Baker are our guests today. Denise is a design researcher practicing in the design space since the early 2000s and the Director of Design at Hope Lab. Andrew Baker is living and working at the intersection of technology and experience design. He?s the Vice President of Product at Grit Digital Health and teaches Experience Design at the University of Colorado. Denise and Andrew collaborated on a way to combat loneliness in college students. We talk about designing for mental health, Nod, an app that is helping young people avoid negative health outcomes associated with loneliness, and how college students were involved in creating Nod.

 

Show Summary

 

Denise and Andrew had very different entry points into design. Denise?s journey began with a love for people and cultures. She started her undergrad as an anthropology student, but she wanted to not just study culture, but to shape it. That led her into design. She studied product design at the Illinois Institute of Technology, and landed an internship at IDEO, where she ended up staying for eight years while also teaching design at the California College of Arts. Denise opened her own design practice and started doing design research into younger generations ? not just designing products for them, but also working to understand their way of seeing and experiencing the world. Now, she works at Hope Lab, where the focus is on creating digital technologies that help young people live happier, healthier lives.

 

Andrew?s interests were influenced at an early age by his father, a graphic designer, and his mother, a civic leader focused on social impact. He studied business and English literature at the University of Colorado, but also minored in technology, arts and media, where he studied software development and honed his self-taught graphic design skills. An internship at a Denver agency allowed him to continue developing that skill set, but also gave him the opportunity to dig into user experience and into understanding human behavior and using those insights to guide designing product solutions. He moved into a dual role with Cactus and Grit Digital Health, leading both companies? creative technology practices before moving into a full-time position at Grit Digital Health, where the focus is on creating digital health solutions for college students designed to help them improve their mental health and wellness.

 

Denise and Andrew talk about designing for mental health and their collaboration to create Nod, an app for college students. Nod is designed to help students make social connections and relationships in an effort to address the loneliness many students end up feeling when they arrive on campus and begin their higher education journey.

 

Listen in to learn more about:

Designing digital health products for younger generations The Nod app How Nod was designed and developed Co-creating with college students Hope Lab?s work and projects Grit Digital Health?s wellbeing tool and other projects 

Our Guests? Bios

 

Denise Ho

Denise Ho brings more than 15 years of creative leadership experience as a design thinker, strategist, and qualitative design research with expertise in healthcare, transformative technologies, and industrial design. She spent 8 years at IDEO, and is currently Director of Design at Hopelab. She leads a diverse team of design researchers, industrial designers, and creative strategists to create technologies that are engaging, sustainable, and scaled to impact as many lives as possible. Denise enjoys gardening and spending time with her twin daughters, husband, and puppy.

 

Andrew Baker

In his role at Grit Digital Health, Andrew inspires and guides the design of user-centered solutions across technology mediums and industry verticals. With a background in experience design and software development, Andrew and his team strive to develop wellbeing products that are rooted in research, behavior design, and business strategy. Outside of his role at Grit, Andrew is an adjunct professor at the University of Colorado, where he teaches user experience design in an MA program for Strategic Communication Design.

 

 

Show Highlights

 

[01:30] How Denise found her way to a career in digital design.

[05:08] Andrew?s journey into digital design.

[10:18] Denise gives an introduction to Nod.

[11:12] Andrew follows up with his ?elevator pitch? for Nod.

[12:28] The question that drove Nod?s naissance at Hope Lab in 2017.

[13:25] The connection between loneliness and college students? mental health.

[14:48] Denise talks about the early research and discovery stage of Nod.

[15:45] Nod?s unique problem space.

[16:58] Collaborating with college students using an early paper prototype of the app.

[18:19] Nod?s next steps forward in development.

[18:52] Andrew talks about reverse engineering health outcomes.

[20:01] The three categories of psychological health outcomes Nod targets.

[21:36] Successfully changing behavior requires small concrete steps.

[24:15] College students continued to play an important role in the development of Nod.

[25:30] The challenges of working on a solution for a very personal and private issue.

[27:16] Co-creating with students on Nod has been an incredible experience.

[27:56] Nod?s pilot phase with the University of Oregon.

[28:20] Service design and delivery is one of the biggest challenges for digital products.

[30:06] Nod?s pilot phase at the University of Colorado Denver focused on service design.

[31:31] COVID-19?s impact on the development of Nod.

[33:20] Hope Lab?s tri-discipline approach to collaboration and co-creation.

[35:19] Denise talks more about the randomized control trial at the University of Oregon and how it proved Nod was working.

[36:31] How people reacted when they heard about Nod?s development.

[37:48] Andrew offers insights into the rise and future of digital-only health and wellbeing design.

[39:15] Why Nod is such a special project and product.

[41:31] Where you can find Nod.

[42:22] Partnership with Snapchat to release Nod in 2021.

[43:31] How universities can participate in Nod?s pilot program.

[44:29] Denise talks about another project Hope Lab is working on, focused on identity affirmation of LGBTQ+ people.

[47:25] Andrew talks about Grit Digital Health?s digital personalized wellbeing tool.

[48:21] Grit Digital Health is hosting a panel at an upcoming Innovation Learning Network conference.

 

 

Links

 

Denise on LinkedIn

Andrew on LinkedIn

Andrew on Instagram

Andrew on Grit Digital Health

Nod

Nod?s product overview

Press release on efficacy data for Nod

Hope Lab

Hope Lab Milk

Hope Lab?s LGBTQ+ Youth Mental Health and Resilience Project

Grit Digital Health

YOU at College

University of Colorado Boulder, Master of Arts in Strategic Communication Design

Elon By Design

Fast Company?s "Innovation by Design" award (Nod was honored in 2 categories)

Journal of Medical Internet Research Mental Health: Smartphone App to Address Loneliness Among College Students: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

 

 

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

Mapping and Service Design + Implementation + Accessibility with Linn Vizard ? DT101 E17

 

Launching and Leading a University-wide Design Thinking Initiative with Danielle Lake ? DT101 E31

 

Designing Health Systems + Creating Effective Design Workshops with Sean Molloy ? DT101 E44

 

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-12-08
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Teams, Sprints, Prototyping, and Better Meetings with Douglas Ferguson ? DT101 E59

Douglas Ferguson is the founder of Voltage Control, a workshop agency on a mission to rid the world of horrible meetings. We talk about teams, design sprints, prototyping, and creating meetings that matter.

 

Show Summary

As a coder during the 90s tech bubble, Douglas discovered that he loved working as part cross-functional teams often found in startup companies, and wearing different hats as needed during a project. When the Agile Manifesto came out in early 2001, Douglas realized that a lot of its principles were things he and his teams had already been doing. He began combining Agile and Lean methodologies to find ways teams can work together better.

Douglas? company, Voltage Control, focuses on helping teams learn how to better collaborate. During our conversation, we talk about the hallmarks of a well-functioning team, Douglas? work with organizations using design sprints and prototyping, and how Douglas? new book, Magical Meetings, is helping us all be able to have better, more meaningful and productive meetings. 

 

Listen in to learn more about:

The traits of a well-functioning team How prototyping can help an organization The ins and outs of design sprints The two questions to ask when designing the test for a prototype Douglas? new book, Magical Meetings How to have better meetings, no matter what industry you?re in Adapting to the new virtual meeting space

 

Our Guest?s Bio

Douglas is an entrepreneur and human-centered technologist with over 20 years of experience. He is president of Voltage Control, an Austin-based workshop agency that specializes in Design Sprints and innovation workshops. Prior to Voltage Control, Douglas held CTO positions at numerous Austin startups, where he led product and engineering teams using agile, lean, and human-centered design principles. While CTO at Twyla, Douglas worked directly with Google Ventures running Design Sprints and now brings this experience and process to companies everywhere.

 

Show Highlights

[01:36] Douglas talks about how he got into design and his focus on teams and teamwork.

[03:57] Launching Voltage Control to help teams work better together.

[04:30] How a well-functioning team evolves.

[05:05] The importance of trust between team members.

[05:36] Douglas connects the Gallup?s Q12 survey to team trust.

[08:06] How Douglas introduces teams to prototyping.

[08:51] Creating a vision document of how the team might use prototyping.

[09:23] Why Douglas needs to understand the shared values of a team.

[11:01] Two tactics Douglas uses to help teams come to a shared understanding.

[14:30] Douglas defines prototyping.

[14:43] Douglas shares one of his favorite examples of prototyping: the five pound weight.

[17:16] Prototypes help teams separate the problem space from the solution space.

[18:50] How Douglas facilitates team prototyping.

[19:41] The two components of a design sprint.

[20:10] The importance of the question ?What is the test we need to run?? when designing a prototype.

[20:30] The Riskiest Assumption Test (RAT).

[22:00] The two questions Douglas asks after deciding on the prototype test.

[22:57] Setting expectations for a design sprint and avoiding the ?design sprint slump.?

[23:44] A design sprint is only the beginning of the work.

[24:30] Why it?s important for an organization?s leadership to understand what design sprints can and can?t do.

[25:00] Prototyping is intended to give insights and understanding of the problem space to provide direction for the work to come.

[26:55] Leadership must understand there is more work to do after the design sprint.

[28:49] Design sprints as design research.

[29:46] Douglas talks about ?branding? the design sprint.

[31:11] How Douglas is gathering facilitation techniques and tools from different industries and applying them to help us all improve our meetings.

[33:22] Douglas? new book, Magical Meetings.

[34:03] How meeting participants can help the meeting facilitator.

[35:10] Magical Meetings offers action steps and principles anyone can use to improve their meetings.

[36:11] Douglas offers his thoughts on remote work and virtual meetings, and COVID-19 is changing his work.

[37:53] Advice for those holding virtual workshops and meetings.

[38:45] Intentionally designing virtual experiences.  

[40:35] Two virtual tools Douglas recommends for those creating online experiences.

[42:21] Where to find out more about Douglas and his work.

 

Links

Douglas on LinkedIn

Douglas on The Future Shapers

Douglas' posts on Medium

What is design thinking?

Bringing Design Thinking into Technology

Voltage Control

Beyond the Prototype

Inside Innovation - Inside Outside podcast with Douglas

Beyond the Prototype - Techblog Writer UK podcast episode with Douglas

Gallup?s Q12 Survey

Loom screencasting tool

Session Lab workshop planning tool

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Stakeholder-Centered Design, Design Thinking in Large Organizations, and Critique for Design Teams with Jean-Louis Racine ? DT01 E3

Teaching Yourself Design Thinking + Innovating in Government with Amy J. Wilson ? DT101 E19

Designing Your Team + Teams in Design Education + Coaching Design Teams with Mary Sherwin and David Sherwin ? DT101 E49

 

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Fluid Hive?s Ask Like a Designer ? Monthly articles with design ideas, methods, frameworks, templates, and a question-fueled approach to design-driven innovation. Discover new ways to learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation.

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-11-24
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Learning Design with Yianna Vovides ? DT101 E58

Yianna Vovides is the Director of Learning Design and Research at the Center for New Designs and Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS) at Georgetown University. She?s also a professor for the Master of Arts in Learning, Design, and Technology (LDT) program at Georgetown, and the Curriculum Director for LDT. In her role at CNDLS, she oversees the digital learning efforts, including online programs. We discuss learning, learning design, and designing online learning during the pandemic and beyond.

 

 

Show Summary

 

A passion for discovering how we communicate launched Yianna?s journey into instructional and curriculum design. In her Master?s in development support communication, she studied how we work and communicate in international settings, especially in terms of communication pathways up and down an organization?s hierarchy. During her master?s work, she took an Introduction to instructional design course, and realized that it was the bridge she had been looking for to create those communication pathways.

 

In this episode, we talk about how people learn and how Yianna teaches learning design to her students. We learn more about the LDT program at Georgetown. Yianna discusses the learning journey, creating ?beautiful? learning experiences, and how the current health crisis has accelerated the rise of e-learning and the tools and technologies that make e-learning possible.

 

 

Listen in to learn more about:

Learning design as compared to instructional design Georgetown University?s Learning, Design, and Technology program The complexity behind how people learn The difference between an instructional designer and a learning designer ?What is learning? as an impossible question to answer How the COVID-19 health crisis is re-shaping how we teach and learn E-learning spaces and how they are being used now

 

Our Guest?s Bio

 

Dr. Yianna Vovides? work intersects three areas ? education, technology, and development. Over the last two decades, she has focused her practice and academic efforts in addressing how people learn within networked learning environments. She has worked on projects that emphasize individual and group learning, institutional programs that enable systemic changes, and research that examines how new technologies support teaching and learning.

 

Professor Vovides currently serves as Director of Learning Design and Research at the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS), Professor for the Master of Arts in Learning, Design, and Technology (LDT) program at Georgetown University, and Curriculum Director for LDT. In her role at CNDLS, she oversees the digital learning efforts including online programs. She has over 15 years of experience in higher education and has been instrumental in establishing programmatic efforts for university-wide services in online learning. As a professor, she serves as faculty in LDT and teaches courses both for the program core and learning design track core ? Methods of Learning and Design and Theories, Process Models, and Strategies.

 

 

Show Highlights

 

[01:37] Yianna talks about what learning design and instructional design are in terms of higher education and her work.

[02:52] How Yianna found her way into instructional design.

[04:56] Pairing instructional design with computer-based instruction.

[06:55] Yianna?s coursework is designed to help students find their own best path into learning.

[07:40] Yianna?s dissertation on cognitive flexibility and the need for openness and vulnerability.

[09:23] Wanting students to focus on learning, not process.

[09:43] The LDT program starts by asking students ?What is learning??

[11:08] By studying the outliers and designing for them, Yianna can create a better design for all.

[12:41] Why it can be challenging for a newcomer getting into learning design.

[13:41] The lack of learner agency in current educational environments, and how the LDT program is different.

[14:12] The collaborative nature of the LDT program for students.

[16:36] More about the LDT program and how it?s structured.

[17:12] Why Yianna prefers the term ?learning design? over ?instructional design.?

[18:57] The LDT program?s four core components.

[19:40] How the LDT design studio incorporates all four of the core components.

[22:20] How constraints and boundaries can fuel creativity and innovation.

[23:12] The importance of the question, ?What is the problem you?re trying to solve?? and of encouraging students to keep asking questions.

[26:00] Why collaboration is an integral part of being a learning designer.

[27:20] The key difference between a learning designer and an instructional designer.

[28:50] Yianna believes that more research needs to be done on the driving factors and motivators behind collaboration.

[30:15] Yianna talks about the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

[30:47] How e-learning is opening the doors of learning to more communities all across the world.

[34:39] COVID-19 and emergency e-learning.

[35:35] Moving from emergency e-learning spaces into designed e-learning spaces.

[37:35] How a particular tool or technology can spark learning design ideas.

[38:04] Yianna encourages teachers and students to play in their virtual classrooms to become comfortable with them.

[39:01] Deciding between synchronous and asynchronous learning experiences in the virtual classroom.

[41:28] Yianna recommends resources for those wanting to learn more about how people learn and learning design.

 

Links

Yianna on LinkedIn

Yianna?s profile page at Georgetown University

Yianna?s webpage at Georgetown University

Book: Optimizing Instructional Design Methods in Higher Education (Advances in Higher Education and Professional Development)

Book: Learning from Hypermedia: The Role of Metacognitive Skills

MOOC: Massive Open Online Courses

IDEXX Learning Center

Coursera

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

Designing for the Greater Good, Strategy + Design Thinking, and Measuring Design Thinking with Jeanne Liedtka ? DT101 E1

 

How to Learn Design Thinking + Design Thinking Pedagogy with Julie Schell ? DT101 E15

 

Learning Design + Designing for How People Learn with Julie Dirksen ? DT101 E42

 

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Fluid Hive?s Ask Like a Designer ? Monthly articles with design ideas, methods, frameworks, templates, and a question-fueled approach to design-driven innovation. Discover new ways to learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation.

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

 

2020-11-10
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Critical and Emancipatory Design Thinking with Lesley-Ann Noel ? DT101 E57

Dr. Lesley-Ann Noel is the Associate Director for Design Thinking for Social Impact and a professor of practice at Tulane University, and an Afro-Caribbean designer who focuses on critical emancipatory design thinking. We talk about power issues and design, participatory design, working with community partners, teaching design, thinking in ways that help students reflect on difference, and the Designer's Critical Alphabet.

 

 

Show Summary

 

Lesley?s passion for design started in middle school, and by the time she graduated from high school, she was looking for a place to continue her design studies. She ended up in Brazil, where she spent a year studying graphic design and five years in industrial design before returning to Trinidad, where she worked as a design consultant and taught at the University of the West Indies.

 

After coming to the U.S. to get her Ph.D. at North Carolina State University, she spent a year teaching at Stanford?s d.School before moving on to her current position at Tulane University.

 

Lesley talks about the importance of positionality and identity in her work, and how her classes and coursework have changed in response to the events of 2020, including the current COVID-19 health crisis. We learn how and why Lesley created the Designer?s Critical Alphabet, and what she hopes the cards will do for people who use them.

 

Listen in to learn more about:

How power and identity influence design Making design more inclusive with communities and stakeholders ? designing with, not designing for How design thinking can be used to give marginalized populations a voice and a seat at the table The changes and adaptations Lesley is making to her classes in response to COVID-19 The Designer?s Critical Alphabet

 

Our Guest?s Bio

 

Dr. Lesley-Ann Noel Is Afro-Trinidadian design educator, based in New Orleans. She practices design through emancipatory, critical and anti-hegemonic lenses, focusing on equity, social justice and the experiences of people who are often excluded from design research. She also attempts to promote greater critical awareness among designers and design students by introducing critical theory concepts and vocabulary into the design studio e.g. through The Designer?s Critical Alphabet. Her research also highlights the work of designers outside of Europe and North America as an act of decolonizing design. Her identity is shaped by her ethnic background as an Afro-Trinidadian; her experience as a daughter, sister and mother; and her lived experiences in Trinidad and Tobago, Brazil, Tanzania, Uganda and the USA.



Show Highlights

 

[01:28] Lesley shares her path into design.

[02:05] Her time in Brazil.

[02:35] Returning to Trinidad and working as a design consultant and university professor.

[03:27] Coming to the U.S. for her Ph.D.

[04:40] How her life experiences have strongly influenced her work.

[05:11] Her interest in indigenous cultures and looking at different points of view.

[05:57] Her Design Research Society group?s focus on gathering design stories from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean.

[06:55] Lesley talks about how she teaches design thinking by starting with ?who we are? and talking about positionality and identity.

[08:01] How the focus on identity and positionality changes the way Lesley and her students approach design.

[09:33] The importance of getting the stakeholders involved in the process.

[10:43] The way Lesley is using design thinking to amplify and reflect the voices of those often left unheard.

[11:33] Shifting the power from the university to the community, and letting community partners take the lead.

[12:40] Lesley talks more about the experiences and challenges of exploring identity and power in the classroom.

[15:21] Ways Lesley is working to ensure her students are aware of the agency and power of the communities they are working with.

[16:08] Ensuring the learning and information is flowing in both directions.

[17:05] How 2020?s current events are affecting her teaching and classes.

[19:08] The rewards of watching students grow their confidence and skills as designers.

[20:25] Lesley describes her classes and the academic culture shock some students have when they first get started.

[22:57] How Lesley uses unique creative challenges to help students tap into their ability to reflect, think, and design.

[23:31] The ?design a game? challenge.

[24:27] The ?create a recipe? challenge.

[25:11] Lesley has students redesign a design thinking format and design their own framework.

[27:02] What Lesley is doing to adapt her classes and coursework to the new realities of the COVID-19 crisis.

[29:43] Remote work pushes the need to create activities for relationship building and allocate enough time for them.

[32:16] Being intentional about relationship building.

[33:47] Designer?s Critical Alphabet card deck overview.

[34:23] The Designer?s Critical Alphabet?s purpose is to help designers look at a project with different lenses and perspectives.

[34:43] Lesley discusses a couple of the cards in depth.

[36:33] The Designer?s Critical Alphabet is a way for designers to learn and develop critical theory and vocabulary.

[37:19] Lesley?s students use the cards to learn new vocabulary, theories, and ideas.

[39:00] The Designer?s Critical Alphabets humble beginnings as a small side project.

[40:10] How Lesley?s viral LinkedIn post in June 2020 brought the Designer?s Critical Alphabet deck to a larger audience.

[42:23] Lesley?s one fear about the cards.

[44:26] The two things Lesley hopes the cards will encourage people to do.

[46:04] How to learn more about Lesley and her work.

 

Links

Dr. Noel on Twitter
Dr. Noel on LinkedIn
Dr. Noel?s website
Dr. Noel on Tulane University?s website
A Designer?s Critical Alphabet Cards
?Teaching and Learning Design Thinking through a Critical Lens at a Primary School in Rural Trinidad and Tobago?
Dr. Noel?s work with emancipatory research and design thinking
CAE research conference call with Dr. Noel as she presents her research/processes in the field of critical design thinking with an emphasis on emancipatory process.

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

How to Learn Design Thinking + Design Thinking Pedagogy with Julie Schell ? DT101 E15

 

Design Thinking + Learning Science with Adam Royalty ? DT101 E18

 

Rethinking Service Design + Student Projects + Community Systems with Amy O?Keefe ? DT101 E56

 

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-10-27
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Rethinking Service Design + Student Projects + Community Systems with Amy O'Keefe ? DT101 E56

Amy O'Keefe is the Studio Director of Northwestern university?s Master of Science and Engineering Design Innovation program, where she leads the human-centered service design studio. We talk about how the pandemic and the expanding awareness of systemic racism might change services, design, project partnerships, service design studio courses, and communities of practice in design education. Show Host: Dawan Stanford

 

Show Summary

Amy was always interested in experience design, but in the early 90s, there wasn?t a specific discipline teaching it, so Amy had to find her own path by way of studying English literature and architecture during her college years. Her senior thesis ? an examination of how people experience memorial architecture, with a focus on the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. ? was her first real foray into human-centered design and experience design.

Her original intention to continue studying architecture in graduate school changed after taking a job at the Art Institute of Chicago, where she had the opportunity to dig into digital technology. Instead, she pivoted into a fifteen-year career designing digital products and services. Eventually, Amy returned to university for a graduate degree in product design. She began teaching service design while finishing up her graduate work.

Our conversation takes a look at the world today through a service design lens and talks about how service design is changing ? and how it needs to continue to change ? in response to what?s happening around us right now.

 

Listen in to learn more about:

Systemic racism and its effects on service design Ways to ensure service design is focused on equity for marginalized populations Some of the projects Amy and her students have worked on in healthcare and social impact spaces Northwestern?s Student Health Leaders project The value of design communities finding ways to connect and converse with one another Fluid Hive?s Adapt, Respond, and Evolve experience Service Ecosystems and Chicago?s Center on Halsted as a great example

 

Our Guest?s Bio

 

Amy O?Keefe is the Studio Director of Northwestern University's Master of Science in Engineering Design Innovation (EDI) program, where she leads the Human-Centered Service Design Studio.

 

Amy frequently partners with physicians and healthcare organizations to bring a human-centered approach to addressing complex medical issues. Amy has consulted on service, experience, and integrated multi-channel initiatives for Fortune 50 retail and global Am Law 100 clients. Her professional background includes more than a decade leading multi-disciplinary service, product design, and development at a Chicago-based tech startup acquired by Thomson Reuters. Amy received her MS in Product Design and Development Management from Northwestern. As an undergraduate, Amy embraced the Liberal Arts, majoring in English at Davidson College and studying Architecture in Florence, Italy.

 

A sampling of Amy?s recent studio collaborations includes: a partnership with Procter & Gamble that led to the 2016 launch of the integrated laundry service, Tide Spin; engagement with Northwestern Medicine and Lurie Children?s Hospital resulting in lead findings presented at the 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting; and engagement with Penn Medicine?s Anesthesiology and Critical Care team informing the best practices for patient awareness and management of postoperative delirium discussed at the 2016 American Society of Anesthesiologists? Brain Health Summit.

 

She is a founding member of the Integrated Design Innovation consortium (IDI) and is working with colleagues from peer programs at University of Pennsylvania, MIT, Carnegie-Mellon, Harvard and several other schools to establish, evolve, and expand the category of Integrated Design Innovation programs in engineering education.

 

 

Show Highlights

 

[01:36] Amy?s ?crooked? path to service design.

[03:35] Amy defines intentional design.

[03:51] Her job at the Art Institute of Chicago was her introduction to the idea of digital design and creating digital experiences.

[04:49] Pursuing a graduate degree in product design and teaching service design.

[07:22] Looking at the world and current events through a service design lens.

[08:15] Amy talks about how most of our daily and activity journey maps broke this year.

[09:10] The responsibility of service designers in our current environment.

[11:05] How systemic racism and other world events has affected how service design works and the way Amy teaches service design.

[12:26] Amy?s work on a new framework to encourage a better understanding of all stakeholders and complex adaptive systems in a problem space.

[13:28] The need for service designers to understand the various privileges, power, and identities of potential stakeholders.

[14:39] How many service design tools are problematically designed for an idealized world that doesn?t reflect reality, and how Amy helps students to dig for more accurate insights.

[15:22] Service design, acknowledging risk, and running design prototypes to test the impact on marginalized populations.

[16:45] Putting ethics first as a service designer.

[17:25] Amy talks about how she chooses projects for her classes.

[18:35] Amy offers examples of some of her students? projects.

[19:30] The Student Health Leaders project at Northwestern.

[23:58] Solving versus responding when it comes to problem spaces.

[26:46] Ways in which the various design practice communities are starting to come together to share ideas and have conversations about the work.

[32:06] Amy asks Dawan to talk about Fluid Hive?s Adapt, Respond, and Evolve experience.

[34:03] The value of bringing leaders from many different schools together to talk about the current challenges and to share lessons learned.

[35:38] The definition of a service ecosystem.

[36:30] Amy talks about Chicago?s Center on Halsted?s LGBTQ service ecosystem.

[38:42] Amy recommends looking up the Fogo Island Inn and Zita Cobbs? Service Design Network conference presentation.

[40:47] Books and other resources Amy recommends for learning more about service design.

[42:27] Where to find out more about Amy and her work.

 

 

Links

 

Amy at Northwestern University

Amy on LinkedIn

Engineering Design Innovation at Northwestern University

Zita Cobbs and the Crisis of Belonging

Book Recommendation: Service Design: From Insight to Implementation, by Andy Polaine, Lavrans Løvlie, and Ben Reason

Book Recommendation: Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life, by Eric Klinenberg

Book Recommendation: Small Is Beautiful: Economics as if People Mattered, by E. F. Schumacher

Book Recommendation: The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, by Richard Rothstein

 

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

Mapping and Service Design + Implementation + Accessibility with Linn Vizard ? DT101 E17

 

Designing Culture at Work + Social Innovation + Necessary Disquiet with Laurie Currie ? DT101 E29

 

Adding System Awareness to System Design to Your Innovation Stack with Julie Guinn ? DT101 E43

 

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-10-13
Länk till avsnitt

Design Research + Tools for Thinking + Using Research Well with Terri Herbert ? DT101 E55

Terri Herbert is a design researcher and experienced research manager at Asana. She's fascinated by the complexity of the world of work and interested in researching and modeling complex systems involving people and technology. We talk about doing good design research, ways to ensure design research outputs are used effectively, and how a design researcher supports a team throughout the design process. Show Host: Dawan Stanford 

Show Summary

Terri?s journey into design research began in the business world of marketing and communications strategy, where she often worked with survey results and collected data. It was there she first came into contact with the concept of user experience and began to use some design thinking ideas in the iterative process of finding solutions. This led her into UX design and she went back to university for a Master?s degree in human-computer interaction. During this time, she discovered her love of research and modeling systems, which has been a part of her work ever since.

At Asana, Terri?s focus is on understanding how people work together as a team, and on providing ways for teams to work better together. As part of this, she studies team dynamics and team behavior, and looks at individual team member?s skills and abilities. She uses what she learns to motivate team behaviors that foster and maintain a high-functioning work environment.

We?ll hear more about design research and how Terri uses it to discover insights about how we work, and how she and her team strive to make their research accessible and easy to understand for those who need its insights, and the importance of seeing research itself as dynamic and never-ending.

Listen in to learn more about:

What design research is How team dynamics affects a team?s ability to perform and succeed Tools Terri uses to help people connect with and understand her research Ways design and design research are changing as a result of the current health crisis The importance of revisiting and refreshing design research as conditions evolve and change

Our Guest?s Bio

Terri is a design researcher and systems thinker fascinated by the complexity of the world of work. At Asana, a leading work management platform for teams, she heads up research focused on helping teams adopt better work practices. Her background in group and system dynamics, collaboration, and interaction design enables her to apply theory for impact in the real world. Terri holds an MSc in Human-Computer Interaction and has worked with organizations across e-commerce, culture and tourism, transportation services, agriculture, and more.

Show Highlights

[01:07] Terri talks about how she got into design research as a career.

[02:57] A high-level look at the work Terri does at Asana.

[04:40] How Terri structures her research when she?s studying team dynamics.

[05:20] Secondary research sources that are part of Terri?s work.

[06:01] Understanding a team?s dynamics is the key to improving how a team can work together better.

[07:10] Ways Terri and her team ensure the outputs of their research are understood and used effectively by stakeholders.

[08:05] Question mapping as a way to find the key questions and concerns the stakeholders have about the problem space.

[10:09] Terri talks more about how design research gets applied in real contexts.

[10:15] How Terri uses the discovery debrief to provide a team with tools for thinking and action as they move forward in the problem space.

[10:43] Helping the team narrow the scope and bring the problem space into focus.

[12:27] The benefits of role-blending in work environments when it comes to working as a team in the design problem space.

[12:56] How Terri works through situations where she meets resistance to her findings and insights.

[13:09] Using the opportunity tree tool to ensure the team?s work is actually going to address the identified problem.

[14:48] Methods and tools Terri uses to help teams understand and connect with the research.

[15:25] The value in revisiting earlier research on a regular basis to spot trends and long-term insights.

[16:35] Research is not a static, permanent object; it is dynamic, always needing refreshing in response to change.

[18:16] How Terri?s research team has been impacted during the COVID-19 health crisis.

[20:00] The virtual tools and frameworks Terri?s using in her work now.

[20:56] The opportunities and insights occurring in design research as a result of the health crisis.

[23:52] Terri talks about wanting easier ways to help people get past their biases to allow them to go deeper into their own motivations and behaviors.

[26:01] Resources Terri recommends for those interested in design research and design thinking.

[29:29] How to find out more about Terri and her work.

 

 

Links

 

Her Twitter

Her LinkedIn

Terri on Medium

Asana

Getting Emotional: Our first steps with affective interaction
Book Recommendation: The Social Life of Information, by John Seely Brown, Paul Duguid, and David Weinberger
Book Recommendation: The Service Innovation Handbook: Action-oriented Creative Thinking Toolkit for Service Organizations, by Lucy Kimbell
Book Recommendation: Thinking in Systems: A Primer, by Donella H. Meadows and Diana Wright

Book Recommendation: The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence, by Dacher Keltner

Book Recommendation: Collaborating with the Enemy: How to Work with People You Don?t Agree with or Like or Trust, by Adam Kahane

Book Recommendation: Turning People into Teams: Rituals and Routines That Redesign How We Work, by Mary and David Sherwin

 

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

Problem Spaces, Understanding How People Think, and Practical Empathy with Indi Young ? DT101 E6

 

Design Thinking + Learning Science with Adam Royalty ? DT101 E18

 

Designing Your Team + Teams in Design Education + Coaching Design Teams with Mary Sherwin and David Sherwin ? DT101 E49

  

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-09-29
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Designing for Behavior Change + Ethics + Tools with Stephen Wendel ? DT101 E54

Steve Wendel is the author of Designing for Behavior Change, Founder of the Action Design Network, and head of Behavioral Science at Morningstar. We talk about behavioral problem solving, his new book, ethics and behavior design, and his toolkit for anyone who wants to apply behavioral science now. Show Host: Dawan Stanford

Show Summary

Stephen began working with behavioral science during his years at HelloWallet. He was seeking to create products that were more attuned to the mindset of, and challenges experienced by, its customers. Stephen believes that behavioral science needs to be used not just to better understand our limitations and challenges, but also to help us discover and build the tools and solutions we need to overcome those limitations.

One of Stephen?s goals has been to simplify aspects of behavioral science so that more people can use it in their work. His new book, Designing for Behavior Change, and companion workbook offers readers tools and processes that are accessible, practical, and easy to use.

Stephen also offers his thoughts and advice on how behavioral science can help us rethink how we live, work, and succeed in the current COVID-19 health crisis environment, and how this time is one of tremendous opportunity when it comes to forming new life habits, not just on an individual scale, but on a societal one as well.

 

Listen in to learn more about:

How behavioral science is used in the creation of products and services Ethical questions and challenges that arise in the behavioral science and behavior design fields The synergy between behavioral science and design The new edition of Stephen?s book, Designing for Behavior Change Stephen?s new tool, the Decide Framework Action versus outcome and defining the problem space

 

Our Guest?s Bio

 

Dr. Wendel is a behavioral scientist who studies financial behavior and how digital products can help individuals manage their money more effectively. He serves as Head of Behavioral Science at Morningstar, where he leads a team of behavioral scientists and practitioners to conduct original research on saving and investment behavior. Stephen has authored three books on applied behavioral science (Designing for Behavior Change, Improving Employee Benefits, and Spiritual Design) and he founded the non-profit Action Design Network: educating the public on how to apply behavioral research to product development with monthly events in fifteen cities. He has two wonderful kids, who don?t care about behavioral science at all.

 

Show Highlights

 

[02:27] Stephen?s introduction to behavioral science and behavior design.

[03:35] How Stephen helps others understand behavioral design and how to apply it.

[04:42] Stephen?s book is a synthesis of what?s being done and the tools being used across the behavioral science and design communities.

[05:47] Stephen discusses his writing process for Designing for Behavior Change.

[06:17] A new section of the book offers real-world examples of behavioral science teams and work.

[06:50] The book offers a guide for those wanting to enter the field.

[06:56] Stephen talks about expanding the book?s ethics section.

[07:49] Stephen built the Decide Framework for the book, synthesizing best practices from behavioral science teams around the world.

[08:36] The way behavioral science ethics have evolved, and how Stephen approaches the ethical challenges inherent in the work.

[09:56] A few real-world examples of abuses of behavioral science and behavior design.

[10:50] Behavioral science can be manipulative.

[12:27] Using behavioral science to better ourselves and to set the ethical tone in our work.

[14:01] Stephen discusses purposefully writing about the ethical challenges in order to give them more visibility in the behavioral science field.

[15:16] How Milton Glaser?s Road to Hell is applicable to behavioral science.

[16:40] More about the Decide Framework and how to use it.

[20:13] The importance of clearly defining the problem before beginning to look for solutions.

[21:20] The difference between focusing on the action versus the outcome.

[22:41] The need to explore all of the potential implications and consequences of what it is you want to accomplish.

[24:55] How to use the companion workbook/toolkit for Designing for Behavior Change.

[27:01] Stephen?s advice to higher education educators wanting to use this toolkit in the current health crisis.

[30:02] Stephen talks about how the Decide Framework can help those who work in the fields of healthcare and public health.

[32:15] Where to find out more about Stephen?s work.

[33:33] Resources Stephen recommends for those wanting to learn more about behavioral science.

[35:29] How thoughtful design and behavioral science complement one another.

 

 

Links

 

Behavioral Technology ? get your copy of the workbook (it?s free!)

His Twitter

His LinkedIn

Designing for Behavior Change: Applying Psychology and Behavioral Economics, by Stephen Wendel

Action Design Network

Think Better with Steve Wendel

Turning Intention to Action 

Milton Glaser

Milton Glaser?s Road to Hell in 12 Steps

Behavioral Economics

Behavioral Design Hub

Book Recommendation: Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Daniel Kahneman

Books Recommendation: Good Habits, Bad Habits: The Science of Making Positive Changes That Stick, by Wendy Wood

Book Recommendation: More Than Good Intentions: Improving the Ways the World's Poor Borrow, Save, Farm, Learn, and Stay Healthy, by Dean Karlan and Jacob Appel

Book Recommendation: The Last Mile: Creating Social and Economic Value from Behavioral Insights, by Dilip Soman

Book Recommendation: Seductive Interaction Design: Creating Playful, Fun, and Effective User Experiences by Stephen P. Anderson

 

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

Design for Good + Gut Checks + Seeing Power with George Aye ? DT101 E50

 

Behavioral Design X Service Design with Anne van Lieren ? DT101 E40

 

Behavioral Science + Behavior Change Design + Social Impact with Dustin DiTommaso ? DT101 E28

 

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-09-15
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Purpose-Driven Design + Problem Finding + Behavioral Design with Amy Heymans ? DT101 E53

Amy Heymans is Mad*Pow?s Chief Experience Officer and one its foundersof. We talk about how the practice of design is evolving, the emerging role of behavior design, purpose-driven design, and making sure the problems designers are asked to solve connect to business outcomes. Show Host: Dawan Stanford

Show Summary

A love of art led Amy into a career as a designer. She started in web design during the dot-com bubble where she became passionate about user research, usability, and user experience. After the bubble burst, she began to freelance, working in partnership with a former colleague. One project led to another, and the two continued to work together until, eventually, they founded Mad*Pow, fueled by Amy?s vision of design being used to improve the human condition.

Their passion for creating positive change transformed them into healthcare innovation pioneers. Since its inception, Mad*Pow has been at the forefront of helping businesses across multiple industries create human-centered and purpose-driven solutions using design thinking, strategic design, and behavioral change design.

Amy offers listeners her insight into the way design is currently evolving, what the future of design will look like, and how behavior change design is an integral part of that evolution.

Listen in to learn more about:

The evolution of design thinking and purpose-driven design Innovation in healthcare How designers are shaping business model design The business environment necessary for long-term innovation success Behavior change design ? what it is, and how it?s changing design

Our Guest?s Bio

Amy believes that design can help improve the human condition. It was with that mission and vision that she founded Mad*Pow in 2000. Amy plays an essential role in Mad*Pow?s visualization of a changed healthcare system in the United States. Her work with companies like Aetna, CVS, McKesson, and Fidelity has helped them improve the experiences their patients and customers have with them, leverage design to drive change, and facilitate human-centric innovation. As the chief instigator behind Mad*Pow?sHealthcare Experience Design Conference?now in its fifth year and expanded and rebranded as HxRefactored?Amy has successfully connected and networked disparate parts of a challenging and siloed system.

As a speaker, Amy shares her vision and methodology at influential events such as Design Management Institute, UXPA, IA Summit, Partners Center for Connected Health Symposium, Stanford MedicineX, Health 2.0, and HIMSS.

With her partners Will Powley and Bradley Honeyman, Amy?s grown Mad*Pow?s presence, client base, and revenue, leading to Mad*Pow?s 2009 recognition as one of Inc. 500?s fastest growing privately held companies. Mass High Tech, which named her one of its 2009 Women to Watch, has recognized Amy?s passion, energy, and commitment, and she?s been acknowledged as one of Boston?s ?40 Under 40? by the Boston Business Journal for 2014. She supports the vision and mission of An Orphan?s Dream, a nonprofit organization offering an oasis for AIDS-orphaned children in Gachoka, Kenya.

Show Highlights

[02:02] Amy?s love of art led her to a career in design.

[03:19] Freelancing and co-founding Mad*Pow.

[04:30] How design work has changed and evolved over the years.

[04:55] Big brands can be thanked for putting design front and center.

[06:04] Behavior change design is becoming more prominent in design now.

[06:30] Purpose-driven design: finding the balance between what a business wants to achieve and what their customers or clients want to achieve.

[07:16] The ways Amy approaches the topic of purpose-driven design with potential clients.

[08:12] Banks are now recognizing the need for purpose-driven design in their industry.

[09:53] The pre-pandemic state of health systems and behavioral design.

[10:24] Health systems had begun moving towards value-based care.

[11:40] There is no ?silver bullet? tech innovation that will fix our healthcare systems.

[12:55] Amy talks about the gaps between the wants and goals of health insurance companies, healthcare systems, and their patients.

[13:20] Amy sees collaboration between groups of companies as the next frontier in healthcare innovation.

[14:32] Focus of design has shifted to working directly with a business to tailor solutions.

[15:13] How design is helping to innovate business models and strategies.

[15:49] Business design is a blend of design thinking and business strategy.

[17:24] The environment that?s needed in an organization for a project to succeed and thrive long-term.

[19:48] Amy?s advice to business leaders considering working with a design firm.

[20:10] The importance of understanding the problem space before jumping to a solution.

[21:53] Why Amy believes the future of design is behavior change design.

[23:23] How behavioral science and behavioral design is changing the field of design.

[24:20] Designing today means using both creative right-brain and analytical left-brain.

[26:56] The state of healthcare design during today?s COVID-19 crisis.

[27:50] How digital health and home healthcare are evolving.

[29:00] COVID-19 has shone a light on healthcare inequity and the social determinants of health.

[30:26] Amy talks about her interest in the ethos-logos-pathos concept.

[31:03] Amy recommends designers study philosophy, communication and speech-writing.

[33:17] Information about Mad*Pow?s two conferences.

 

 

Links

Amy on MadPow

Amy on LinkedIn

Amy on Twitter

Amy?s page on MassArt

Transforming our Empathy into A Future of Connectedness

Designing an Eco-system of Care, from Stanford MedicineX 2013

Our Calling: Improve Health, from HXRefactored 2015

Design for Change: Empathy as our Guide

The Case for Purpose-Driven Design TEDx Talk by Amy

Design for Change: Empathy and Purpose, HXR 2016

Purpose Driven Design Can Change The World

Designing for Systemic Change Fireside Chat

Design Museum interview with Amy

Edison Profile of Amy (video)

The Three Pillars of Persuasion: Ethos, Logos, Pathos

 

Book Recommendation: Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business, by John Mackey and Rajendra Sisodia

 

 

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

Designing for Healthcare vs Sick Care + The Emergency Design Collective ? DT101 E52

 

Designing Health Systems + Creating Effective Design Workshops with Sean Molloy ? DT101 E44

 

Nursing + Service Design + Healthcare Innovation with Brittany Merkle ? DT101 E38

 

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-09-01
Länk till avsnitt

Designing for Healthcare vs Sick Care + The Emergency Design Collective ? DT101 E52

Nick Dawson is the co-organizer of the Emergency Design Collective. In today?s episode, we talk about healthcare innovation labs, how to think about opportunities in healthcare, healthcare versus sick care, and launching the EDC to support the COVID-19 response. Show Host: Dawan Stanford

Show Summary

Nick Dawson grew up with a father who worked in healthcare and hospitals. As he entered college, he was convinced that he absolutely didn?t want to work in the same field. But the technology used in the local hospital intrigued and interested him enough to accept an internship in the IT department there. While immersed in how hospitals work, Nick discovered his interest in complex systems and their challenges. His internship turned into a lifelong career that led him into design and innovation for healthcare.

While working as a healthcare performance improvement consultant for a large healthcare conglomerate, Nick needed to travel frequently by air. During his business travel, he witnessed a failing airline?s poor treatment of its employees; this was the nascence of his interest in the idea of re-designing healthcare?s patient and staff experiences. He realized that experience is something people and organizations must always create with intention and thought, and something that must be centered on those who are living and working in the experience.

Experience design, healthcare and the ability to wrestle with complexity drives his work. Examples include designing the Johns Hopkins Sibley Innovation Hub, and his recent co-founding of the Emergency Design Collective, which focuses on re-thinking how we approach healthcare, helping businesses and organizations design their work spaces to support the health and wellbeing of their employees, and on creating a ?public health design? core curriculum.

Listen in to learn more about:

The challenges of designing for innovation in hospital environments Designing the Johns Hopkins Sibley Innovation Hub The unique collaborative aspects of clinical hospital teams Creating a flexible work environment and power dynamic in teams The ?product? of healthcare How everything in our life is connected to, and has an influence on, our health The social determinants of health The Emergency Design Collective and its work Ways to rethink how we work and function in order to design for good health

Our Guest?s Bio

Nick Dawson has been at the forefront of bringing design innovation to healthcare. He started and led the design innovation program at Johns Hopkins before joining Kaiser Permanente to lead innovation nationally. Nick chaired the Medicine X program in the Stanford school of Medicine until 2019 and worked with the Obama White House to bring patient-centered design to policy making and healthcare priorities. In April 2020, Nick left KP to co-found the Emergency Design Collective ? a group of doctors, designers and public health experts using design to respond to urgent public health crises.

Show Highlights

[03:00] Nick?s start in healthcare and design.

[04:19] Nick discovers his interest in complex systems problems.

[04:28] How a hospital is like a miniature city.

[05:23] Nick?s witnessing of an airline?s financial failure leads to a revelation about experience.

[09:00] Learning from and listening to patients about what they need and want from their healthcare.

[10:57] Why it can be challenging to innovate in healthcare.

[11:29] Why healthcare is a risk-averse industry.

[12:05] Nick?s focus on re-centering the work from the hospital to the communities, patients, and staff it serves.

[12:51] Advice for overcoming people?s resistance to change.

[13:31] The dilemma of how to help people embrace change and innovation instead of resisting it.

[15:00] How hospital staff reacted to the launching of the Johns Hopkins Sibley Innovation Hub.

[17:15] Nick talks about building the Sibley Innovation Hub team and working to create a welcoming space.

[18:27] The unique characteristics of teams and teamwork in the clinical hospital environment versus the management side of healthcare.

[19:39] How Nick disseminated power among his team members.

[21:59] Nick?s thoughts on the ?product? of healthcare.

[22:50] The concept of a social needs emergency room existing upstream of clinical emergency rooms.

[23:05] The interconnectedness of every part of our life with our health.

[23:20] The social determinants of health.

[24:18] What it means to design ?upstream? of healthcare.

[27:23] Some opportunities for people who want to act and serve not just in response to the current COVID-19 crisis, but also in the future as systems begin to change.

[28:07] The Emergency Design Collective and the ?new normal.?

[28:27] Nick?s thought on education and how it might change.

[29:15] What might happen if every corporation started to think of itself as an H corp and prioritizing health?

[29:30] How the current global pandemic is potentially re-shaping the way we think about health.

[31:15] Ways the EDC supports purposeful business and space design with a focus on good health and wellbeing.

[33:40] Resources Nick recommends on design, innovation, and healthcare.

Links

Nick on LinkedIn

Nick on Twitter

Emergency Design Collective

Personal Website

Innovation as a requirement for success in healthcare

An Everyone Included Design Story

TEDMED Interview with Nick from 2014

Ward Infinity

Book Recommendation: The Experience Economy, by B. Joseph Pine and James H. Gilmore

Book Recommendation: The Cluetrain Manifesto, by Rick Levine, Christopher Locke, Doc Searls, David Weinberger, and Jake McKee

Book Recommendation: Org Design for Design Orgs, by Peter Merholz and Kristin Skinner

Book Recommendation: 101 Design Methods: A Structured Approach for Driving Innovation in Your Organization, by Vijay Kumar

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Adding System Awareness to System Design to Your Innovation Stack with Julie Guinn ? DT101 E43

Designing Health Systems + Creating Effective Design Workshops with Sean Molloy ? DT101 E44

A Designer?s Journey into Designing for Health and Healthcare with Lorna Ross ? DT101 E45

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-08-18
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Weaving Design Thinking into Teams, Leaders and Organizations with Holly O'Driscoll ? DT101 E51

Today?s guest is Holly O'Driscoll, the founder and CEO of Ampersand Innovation, a boutique consultancy focusing on bringing more human-centered design, innovation, strategy, and leadership development to the world. During the conversation, you'll learn about intersections between innovation and leadership, designing and facilitating innovation teams, and insights into shaping organizational innovation. Host:  Dawan Stanford.

Show Summary

Holly believes her journey into design began when she was kicked out of kindergarten after only two weeks (only to be promoted to first grade) for her precocious behavior. Later, in middle school, she started her own business, renting out pens and pencils to her fellow classmates. She?s continued pushing boundaries, asking difficult questions, and challenging assumptions.

Her undergraduate degree was in Chemistry, with her future plans aimed at going to medical school, but a chance interview with Proctor & Gamble on her college campus changed her career trajectory. She ended up getting an MBA and working at P&G for 22 years, traveling all around the world servicing plants, before moving into the corporate design organization in the company, which was still in its early stages. Holly?s introduction to design thinking would also come during her time at P&G, when she returned to work after maternity leave ? and it changed her life. After that first training, Holly entered a rigorous design thinking training program co-developed by Stanford d.school. She would eventually take over P&G?s North American design thinking role, and two years later, she became the head of the company?s Global design thinking.

In 2018, Holly left P&G to start her own consultancy after numerous requests from business colleagues asking her to come and do the same team training and work she was doing for P&G. Now, she?s in the process of finding ways to transition her work into the virtual space while still maintaining the same thoughtful, meaningful experience that comes from an in-person event.

Listen in to learn more about:

The intersection between innovation and leadership How our ?on demand? culture can create challenges when it comes to time expectations and design thinking Our society?s obsession with perfection and getting things right The two things Holly believes prevents innovation teams from achieving their goals How learning design thinking is like learning a new language The importance of the right mindset in an organization wanting to use design thinking The HIPPO concept What Holly considers when building teams The facilitation exercise Holly uses to build rapport and connection in a team When an organization really needs someone outside the org to facilitate a team 

Our Guest?s Bio

Holly O?Driscoll is an industry expert in the field of Design Thinking and human centered innovation. Throughout her 20+ year career, Holly has built a reputation as a master human centered innovation strategist, trainer and facilitator having led programs in more than 20 countries. She is the former Global Design Thinking Leader at Procter & Gamble, where she led more than 250 workshops, often at the request of C-suite executives. She is the founder and CEO of Ampersand Innovation, LLC; a Design Thinking and human centered innovation strategy consultancy.

Show Highlights

[02:20] Holly?s very early start into pushing boundaries and challenging assumptions.

[05:05] The chance interview with Proctor & Gamble during college that changed Holly?s career plans.

[07:43] Her introduction to design thinking.

[09:00] Holly?s transition from P&G to starting her own consultancy and teaching at Rutgers.

[11:50] The early challenges Holly faced while facilitating design thinking

[13:00] Holly talks about some of today?s challenges for design thinking because of the ?on demand? business culture.

[14:50] Making design thinking part of a business?s everyday mindset.

[17:37] Holly?s advice for building and leading a strong team.

[19:04] The two things that can keep an innovation team from being able to solve tough problems.

[20:50] How learning design thinking is a little like learning a language.

[21:55] The importance of leaders providing opportunities, support, and space for people to practice their design thinking skills.

[25:46] Holly talks about how mindset is a key to successful, sustainable design thinking in an organization.

[28:00] Choosing curiosity and the sense of being on a learning journey over being right.

[30:18] The HIPPO concept and how it can affect a team.

[31:09] Key leadership qualities needed to create a safe space for innovators.

[31:31] The correlation between inter-team relationships, social capital, and a team?s success.

[32:49] The importance of thinking about mindset and social capital when building a team.

[33:01] The things Holly considers when assembling a team.

[34:00] Holly?s facilitation exercise at the first meeting of any team that helps teams build personal connections and relationships.

[37:03] The signs and signals of a team that has started to come together.

[40:02] Books and resources Holly recommends.

Links

Holly on Twitter

Holly on LinkedIn

Holly on Design Thinking Ireland

Holly on Rutgers University?s Center for Innovation Education

Interview with Holly on Irish Tech News

Podcast Interview with Holly on TechCentral.ie

Book: Why Design Thinking is Good Business Thinking, by Holly O?Driscoll

Books Holly has contributed to:

         The Future of Making, by Tom Wujec, editor

Design Thinking at Work: How Innovative Organizations are Embracing Design, by David Dunne

Innovation by Design: How Any Organization Can Leverage Design Thinking to Produce Change, Drive New Ideas, and Deliver Meaningful Solutions, by Thomas Lockwood and Edgar Papke

Book Recommendation: Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, by Carol S. Dweck

Book Recommendation: Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work, by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

Book Recommendation: The Power of Moments: Why Certain Experiences Have Extraordinary Impact, by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

Book Recommendation: Beyond Measure: The Big Impact of Small Changes, by Margaret Heffernan

Book Recommendation: Originals: How Non-Conformists Move The World, by Adam Grant

Book recommendation: The End of Average: Unlocking Our Potential by Embracing What Makes Us Different, by Todd Rose

TED Speaker Margaret Heffernan

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Leading a Design Thinking Consultancy, Betting Small to Win Big, and Driving Business Growth with Design Thinking with Natalie Foley ? DT101 E5

From Branding to Design + Teaching Design Teams + Leading Summer of Design with Karen Hold ? DT101E13

Building Design Capacity + Measuring Design Value + Designing Studios with Doug Powell ? DT101 E16

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-08-04
Länk till avsnitt

Design for Good + Gut Checks + Seeing Power with George Aye ? DT101 E50

Today?s guest is George Aye, the co-founder of Greater Good Studio and an Adjunct Full Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. We talk about creating a design studio driven by social impact, how to make facing the hard, ethical questions part of how a team functions, and what it means to design and lead with a deep awareness of power and its absence. Dawan Stanford, is your podcast host.

Show Summary

George?s path to design began in England, where he studied mechanical engineering at university before being fortunate enough to be given the opportunity to work with IDEO in their Chicago office. It meant packing up and moving overseas. For George, his time with IDEO was pivotal, both to his understanding of what design was, but also for what it felt like to work as part of a world-class team.

During his time at IDEO, George was already noticing questions about the work, why we do it, and why certain projects ? those with a clear social mission ? engendered very different feelings in him than those without that mission. He wondered how he might focus this work on the social mission projects. Seven years on, he would leave IDEO to work at the Chicago Transit Authority, where he designed a bus and researched bus ridership.

When the political environment shifted and he was let go from the CTA, George started teaching at the Art Institute of Chicago. It was here that his idea for a design studio focused solely on the social sector began to take shape.

Since co-founding Greater Good Studio, George has continued to ask the hard questions, and encourages his team and his students to do the same. George talks about why these questions are important, the dynamics of power and how it can offer insight into people?s motivations and behaviors, and how to incorporate these discussions into the daily functioning of your design team. 

Listen in to learn:

Some of the ethical questions George and his team tackle when approaching a potential project with a client Why it?s a good thing to always be asking ?What are we doing, and why?? How questioning assumptions is essential for good decision-making The importance of creating a ?psychologically safe? workplace George?s thoughts about power and understanding how it shapes behavior and outcomes Ways to bring learned expertise and lived experience together in teaching design Why the idea of ?saving people? is problematic

Our Guest?s Bio

George co-founded Greater Good Studio with the belief that design can help advance equity. Previously, he spent seven years at global innovation firm IDEO before being hired as the first human-centered designer at the Chicago Transit Authority. Since founding Greater Good, he has worked across complex social issues such as criminal justice, civic engagement, public education, public health and youth development. He speaks frequently across the US and internationally. George holds the position of Adjunct Full Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Show Highlights

[02:16] George talks about how he got into design via engineering.

[02:54] His move from London to Chicago to work at IDEO.

[03:38] George discovers a preference for projects with a clear social mission and impact.

[04:50] Leaving IDEO to work for the Chicago Transit Authority.

[05:13] George realizes he wanted to work at a place with a clearly stated public mission, something larger than himself.

[05:52] How George got into teaching.

[06:13] The ideas that drove the founding of Greater Good Studio.

[07:37] Greater Good?s commitment to designing for the social sector.

[07:55] George talks about Greater Good?s project vetting process and determining whether they have the right to do a project or not.

[10:08] George recounts a time he and his team wrestled with whether they had a right to take on a project, and the process the team goes through during those discussions.

[11:35] The ways the team interrogates a project, and how they share power.

[13:14] The ethical questions George had around a project for automated vehicles.

[14:27] Rigorous questioning as a normal part of Greater Good?s process.

[16:37] How George handles onboarding someone new to the team and Greater Good.

[18:57] Breaking through ingrained assumptions and making constant efforts to create a workplace of psychological safety.

[20:20] The idea of ?hosting? with regards to a team member?s career.

[21:40] The impact of endings, and how they can color your entire experience.

[24:44] George talks about power and powerlessness, and continuing to learn what they mean to him and how they affect the work.

[26:16] Using power as a lens through which to view the world, to better understand how people operate.

[27:46] The desire to understand behavior is a core component of the work Greater Good does.

[28:04] Power as a framework to understand motivations and diagnose behaviors.

[28:47] George gives an example from his time at CTA of viewing a situation through a power lens.

[32:25] The devaluation of lived experience when compared to learned expertise.

[35:30] How George is changing the way he teaches and works with students.

[38:04] Teaching students the problems associated with the idea surrounding ?saving? people.

[38:46] Ways in which George guides students in choosing their design projects.

[40:00] Examples of the interesting projects George?s students have done.

[41:50] Some of the difficulties surrounding charity, altruism, and lasting social change.

[45:47] The dangers of neocolonialism in design.

[47:37] Books and resources George recommends.

[51:07] Where to find out more about George and Greater Good Studio.

 

Links

George on Twitter

George on LinkedIn

George at SAIC

Greater Good Studio

Greater Good Studio on Medium

Articles by George:

Why designers write on the walls (and why you should, too)

Design Education?s Big Gap: Understanding the Role of Power

It?s Time to Define What ?Good? Means in Our Industry

The Gut Check, by Sara Cantor Aye

The Reductive Seduction of Other People?s Problems by Courtney Martin

The Perils of Using Technology to Solve Other People's Problems by Ethan Zuckerman

Book Recommendation: White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo

Book Recommendation: Dare to Lead by Brené Brown

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Leading a Design Thinking Consultancy, Betting Small to Win Big, and Driving Business Growth with Design Thinking with Natalie Foley ? DT101 E5

Design for America: Students + Design Thinking + Community Impact, Part 1 ? DT101 E36

Design for America: Founding + Present + Future, Part 2 ? DT101 E37

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

 

2020-07-21
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Designing Your Team + Teams in Design Education + Coaching Design Teams with Mary Sherwin and David Sherwin ? DT101 E49

David and Mary Sherwin work with design teams in for-profit and nonprofit organizations via their consulting business, Ask The Sherwins, LLC. They?re also professors at the Pacific College of Art in the Design and Collaboration Program. In this episode, we go deep into designing teams, consider more effective ways to teach design and teams, and ways to make teams work when working remotely with Dawan Stanford, your podcast host.

Show Summary

David's background is in engineering and liberal arts. He graduated with an English degree, but had a side hustle doing graphic design. That?s where he discovered an interest in design. Much of his early design learning and education was accomplished by apprenticing at various design studios Then, he shifted into product and service design, and he worked in product development for some large software organizations. 

Mary started in organizational development and content strategy, and then moved into teaching within the design discipline. Much of Mary's experience had been working with designers. Most of David's experience was from a designer's standpoint, working with people like Mary.

Mary and David realized that the work they were doing on their respective paths had a lot of synergy and that they each held half of the solution. They started teaching together seven years ago. Three years after that, they founded their company after students in a special graduate-level teamwork class told them they should start their own business, because this was something companies wanted their employees to learn. 

Since starting  Ask The Sherwins, Mary and David have discovered and developed the nuances of developing strong, well-functioning teams. From facilitating your new team at the start of the design process, to what to do when your team feels like it's falling apart, to working through cultural differences, Mary and David have robust processes for all of these team challenges. They discuss their management style, team-building exercises, and team maintenance practices on team design.

Listen in to learn

Why Mary and David?s ability to ?professionally disagree? gives them an advantage when working with design clients Why their two different career paths gives two different perspectives on the design process About cultural biases, assumptions, and their role in design solutions Why Mary and David encourage students and professors to teach and learn from each other Advice on how to start your team Mary and David?s team facilitation process during their first meeting Team word tools to use when the team situation gets difficult When you should use behavioral questioning

Our Guests? Bio

David and Mary Sherwin are co-founders of Ask The Sherwins, LLC, a consulting and training firm that helps design organizations develop the capabilities they need for better product design and stronger cross-functional teamwork. They have recently coached product and service design teams and provided training around innovation best practices for organizations such as Philips Oral Healthcare, Tipping Point Community, The Purpose Project, Google UX Community and Culture, and Eventbrite. The Sherwins are also active in the design education space. They lead workshops in the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design?s Summer School and currently teach in the MFA in Collaborative Design program at PNCA. In their spare time, David and Mary have collaborated on three books, including their most recent, Turning People Into Teams.

 

Show Highlights 

[02:15] Mary and David talk about their origin story and how they arrived where they are now in design. 

[04:26] How Mary?s experience in teaching played out in her design experience.

[07:48] Components of a team from Mary and David?s perspective. 

[10:08] Prototyping for norms, teams and individual thinking.

[11:08] Advice for starting a team off well.

[11:46] The importance of having team members discuss their values and the behaviors they want to see in the team.

[12:50] The Why?s and How?s of the  Team Words card deck created by Mary and David.

[16:55] How talking through values and behaviors at the beginning helps teams save time and deal with challenges and misunderstandings.

[19:43] Ways a team?s ?status quo?  can create invisible walls and obstacles for new team members. 

[22: 35] What to do when everything that can go wrong with a team has gone wrong.

[24:49] Habits to bring to your team to encourage connection and mutual support.

[27:39] Why you should have a clear ?etiquette? for your team.

[28:53] How their consulting work influences what they teach.

[30:38] Lessons they teach students when they deliberately break up a team.

[33:56] Advice from Mary and David on how and who to hire or choose for a team. 

[35:35] When a design challenge as part of the interview process can be helpful.

[36:18] The two go-to ?silver bullet? questions Mary likes ? one for the interviewer and the interviewee.

[40:57] A look at how David and Mary ?ride along? on a project, and how they tailor their coaching strategy to the client.

[43:18] Ways of working with remote team members and teams.

[46:34] Technology, remote work, and working within human time limitations.

[50:00] Advice to teams on how to make improvements and changes.

[52:03] Mary and David talk about books they?ve read, their own books, and their ephemeral advice column.

 

Links

Design Thinking 101

Fluid Hive Design Innovation

Ask the Sherwins, LLC

Contact Mary and David

Teamwords: The Working Deck

Books by David and Mary Sherwin:

Turning People into Teams

Creative Workshops

Success by Design

Book Recommendation: The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business, by Erin Meyer

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

Humble Design Leadership + Design Agency and Experience Design Evolution with Aleksandra Melnikova ? DT101 E33

  The Evolution of Teaching and Learning Design with Bruce Hanington ? DT101 E39

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-07-07
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Understanding Customers: Research, Insights, and Storytelling with Steve Portigal ? DT101 E48

Steve Portigal is the Principal of Portigal Consulting and an experienced user researcher who helps companies harness the strategic power of insights. He is the author of Interviewing Users: How to Uncover Compelling Insights. He also wrote Doorbells, Danger, and Dead Batteries: User Research War Stories. We talk about interviewing people, customer research, and storytelling with Dawan Stanford, your podcast host.

Show Summary

Steve started out in Human Computer Interaction (HCI), in the days before the World Wide Web and before the formal idea of user experience (UX) existed. He had a brief exposure to design as a profession through an article about industrial product design, and to the idea of bringing together people from many different disciplines to collaborate and create solutions to problems via another article about a project trying to determine how best to find a way to demarcate dangerous locations, like nuclear waste sites. These ideas planted seeds leading to his interest in design. Steve graduated with his Masters in HCI, had a summer internship in Silicon Valley, and eventually found a job in an industrial design consultancy to work on what was essentially proto-UX design with their software.

At the same time, this company was exploring ideas surrounding ethnographic research and the idea of uncovering product opportunities, and Steve managed to apprentice himself with the team, where he learned about organizing and finding connections within data. He also had the opportunity to develop his initial interviewing skills, which he continued to hone as he started his own consultancy focused on user research. Steve was one of the first people in the early 90?s to develop design processes for user experience and research.

We talk about Steve?s excitement for and interest in spending more time with stakeholders within a client?s organization. He has learned why a stakeholder?s perspective is essential in relation to the success of a project. He talks about creating ?learning-ready? moments, how he helps people have these moments, and how learning and sharing the journey of learning affect learning retention.

Listen in to learn:

How Steve and others developed the design processes in the early stages of user experience and research  How Steve?s skills, interests, and the work he does for his clients has evolved over the years When Steve knows he?s found a great client Why he believes that learning together is when change can happen Why understanding stakeholders gives better results with clients Being able to embrace realistic expectations of what you can accomplish 

 

Our Guest?s Bio

Steve Portigal is an experienced user researcher who helps companies to think and act strategically when innovating with user insights. Based in the San Francisco Bay Area, he is principal of Portigal Consulting and the author of two books: the classic Interviewing Users: How To Uncover Compelling Insights and, Doorbells, Danger, and Dead Batteries: User Research War Stories.

 

He's also the host of the Dollars to Donuts podcast, where he interviews people who lead user research in their organizations. Steve is an accomplished presenter who speaks about culture, innovation, and design at companies and conferences across the globe.

 

Show Highlights 

[02:09] Steve talks about his origin story and his introduction to the ideas of design and user experience. 

[06:15] Steve?s first job at an industrial design consultancy.

[08:15] Steve?s apprenticeship with the team exploring a nascent practice in what was basically user experience. 

[09:58] Many companies were exploring and experimenting with these new ideas around user research in the 90s, and how that led to the development of best practices and processes around the work.

[13:05] Steve?s litmus test for a new client.

[13:37] How Steve?s role and work started to shift and change.

[15:40] The way in which Steve sets up expectations with new clients and spending time with the stakeholders in a client?s organization.

[16:20] The value in spending as much time with stakeholders as with users to gain a deep understanding of their motivations and perceptions.

[19:03] Repetitive patterns and questions Steve sees with clients.

[22:28] Using storytelling to help explain concepts and share information, and to help move clients through shared experiences and discussions.

[24:04] Separating the value of the research from any action that may take place.

[28:15] The importance of the ?Why? of user research.

[30:39] How Steve?s practice has evolved and the scope of his work today, now that many companies have in-house user research and design teams.

[35:05] Steve?s specialized ?master classes? for design teams.

[38:52] What Steve wishes everyone knew about user research and what you can do with it, both personally and organizationally.

[41:24] Steve?s reflections on a few of his learning experiences.

[44:55] His experience with one of the experts he used in his consulting work.

[48:35] What Steve might add to a new book about interviewing users and UX, should he decide to write one.

[54:00] Where you can find out more about Steve and his work.

 

Links

Portigal Consulting

Steve Portigal on LinkedIn

Steve Portigal on Medium

Steve Portigal on Twitter

Find Out More About Steve?s Books

Dollars to Donuts Episode 30: Laith Ulaby of Udemy

Dollars to Donuts Episode 27: Colin MacArthur of the Canadian Digital Service      

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

Problem Spaces, Understanding How People Think, and Practical Empathy with Indi Young ? DT101 E6

 

Public Sector Design + Outcome Chains + Prototyping for Impact with Boris Divjak ? DT101 E26   The Evolution of Teaching and Learning Design with Bruce Hanington ? DT101 E39

       

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-06-23
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Learning Service Design on the Job + Leading a Design Team + Service Design Standards with Tracey Williams ? DT101 E47

Tracey Williams, a Service Design Director for Absa Bank in South Africa, discusses learning service design on the job, growing design skills on her team, and building organizational service design standards with Dawan Stanford, your podcast host.

Show Summary

Tracey?s career didn?t begin in design; she started in financial services, and went through a graduate program focused on business targets and goals. She?d always had an interest in problem-solving, and while working at Absa, she got involved in numerous projects that she found new and exciting outside of her specific role. She had studied marketing, and found that much of the old-school marketing thinking aligned with some of the thinking in design spaces.

She submitted an idea to a social entrepreneurship course and was accepted. Tracey then proceeded to learn service design and design thinking as she led her team through development of the idea. Her biggest challenge during the project was using the tools of design, which were still new to her; she had to learn through doing, and through failure and then trying again. She learned that design is about looking at a problem from a different perspective.

Tracey hosted the first Absa Women Forum at the Wentworth Angels headquarters to celebrate the role of single mothers and women.

Listen in to learn:

How Tracey developed her design skills What service design skills she has learned on her job Why she was called a design ?Padawan? Who Tracey is bringing onto her team for service design How Tracey is developing new designers at Absa What she wishes more people understood about her work How she protects her work from being devoured by the larger system  Books Tracey used to learn service design on the job

Our Guest?s Bio

Tracey is a designer with seven years of experience in financial services. She is currently a Service Design Director for the Absa Bank Design Office, where she has played a key role in establishing and demonstrating the value of Service Design. Her teams have worked across different areas of the business and engaged with several stakeholders along the way, including those in Relationship Banking, Business Banking, Card, and most recently, Home Loans.

She enjoys working with cross-functional teams to solve complex, wicked problems with solutions that address both customers' needs and meet the business objectives. Beyond the delivery of design work, she has a passion for developing young talent and worked with a colleague to start the first design graduate program at the bank focused on transforming and growing its future design leaders.

Show Highlights 

[02:33] How Tracey became involved in banking projects early on in her career.

[03:43] Tracey?s experiences in a social entrepreneurship course.

[06:24] Tracey talks about her early challenges in working with service design.

[10:30] Tracey talks about a design graduate program she co-founded with a colleague.

[12:30] Her leadership team?s work to create a skills matrix for designers.

[14:21] How Tracey is developing new designers to fit the strategic objectives of the bank. 

[16:20] Her work to create solid service design standards for the bank.

[19:10] What she wishes others understood about service design.

[20:39] The concept of ?go slow to go fast? and making sure pacing is comfortable and sustainable.

[23:13] How Tracey is able to prevent her project being devoured by the larger system. 

[25:46] The short term and long term views and value of service design.

[30:09] How Tracey is working  to better tell service design success stories to other staff at the bank, and also to the bank?s customers.

[32:25] Ways other banks can use service design.

[36:27] Maintaining quality within a larger team and keeping up with service design standards.

[42:29] Books and resources that have helped Tracey during her journey.

 

Links

Tracey on LinkedIn

Design Thinking 101

Fluid Hive Design Innovation

Absa Bank

SDN Conference 2019

Book Recommendation: Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions, by Dan Ariely

Book Recommendation: Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Daniel Kahneman

Book Recommendation: Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions, by Dan Ariely

Book Recommendation: Lean Startup: How Today?s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses, by Eric Ries

Book Recommendation: Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope, by Mark Manson

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

 

A Design Thinking Practitioner?s Shift into Higher Education and the Potential for Design Thinking in Higher Education with Fred Leichter ? DT101 E4

 

Public Sector Design + Outcome Chains + Prototyping for Impact with Boris Divjak ? DT101 E26   The Evolution of Teaching and Learning Design with Bruce Hanington ? DT101 E39

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-06-09
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Prototyping Insights + The Prototyping Canvas with Carlye Lauff ? DT101 E46

Carlye Lauff is an independent contractor specializing in innovation strategy and design research. We?ll talk about her path into design and how she obtained her Ph.D. in Design Theory and Methodology, and then hear about her global work with organization innovation using human-centered design. Carlye talks about prototyping barriers, how to overcome these barriers, and her tool, Prototyping Canvas, with Dawan Stanford, your podcast host.

Show Summary

Carlye was exposed to the power of human-centered design thinking with her coursework during her undergrad at Penn State University. One project brought her to Kenya, where she was on a team initiating a telemed health initiative. Through this project, she saw the power of applying design thinking to a real-world problem. As a result, she pursued her Master?s and Ph.D. around design thinking ? including founding the Design for America studio at Colorado University Boulder campus ? with an emphasis on prototyping, and helping companies and organizations find ways to prototype more effectively. She has continued to work on design thinking-based projects around the world.

She is currently consulting in the U.S. in the field of innovation strategy, partnering with organizations and training their teams in the use of design thinking and human-centered design. She also works with teams to co-create solutions to actual projects and challenges in their organizations, including leading a project with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to help children enhance their social-emotional learning. 

Learn how Carlye teaches and trains professionals to make human-centric products, the challenges organizations and people have when prototyping, how to use analogies and case study examples, and how Carlye creates lasting organizational change long after her work with the company is done.

Listen in to learn:

How Carlye co-created an educational children?s toy at Robert Wood Johnson to help preschoolers identify their emotions Her experience with prototyping and how she overcame obstacles with prototyping The two strategies Carlye finds helpful when explaining prototyping Methods you can use for low-fidelity early prototyping How Carlye worked with the International Design Center in Singapore, focused on helping companies create lasting organizational change Two research-validated design tools Carlye collaborated on Carlye?s recipe for how to create great design  Why she takes failure out of her language and replaces it with iterating and evolving

Our Guest?s Bio

Carlye is an innovation strategist, design researcher, and enthusiastic instructor who blends human-centered design practice with systems thinking approaches. She has helped more than 25 global organizations re-think their design processes and strategies, ranging from Fortune 500 companies to government agencies to universities.

Carlye is an independent consultant that empowers people and organizations to innovate using human-centered design methods and strategies. During 2018-2019, Carlye served as a Design Innovation Fellow at the SUTD-MIT International Design Centre (IDC) in Singapore, where she trained companies in design innovation strategies, led an in-depth consulting project for the Land Transport Authority, and researched design methods like the Prototyping Canvas. Carlye received her Ph.D. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Colorado Boulder, where she was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, and her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Pennsylvania State University. Carlye?s research is within the field of Design Theory and Methodology, and she develops tools and methods to support designers and engineers. Carlye also founded the Design for America studio at CU Boulder in 2015 as a way to give students experiences working on interdisciplinary teams applying human-centered design to solve real problems in the community.

Show Highlights 

[02:05] Carlye?s origin story and how she came into design as a career.

[04:08] Her current work in the field of innovation strategy.

[05:23] Her experience with Robert Wood Johnson co-creating a children?s learning project. 

[07:44] The challenges of prototyping.

[10:10] Two strategies she uses to explain prototyping: analogies and case studies.

[12:48] Examples and applications Carlye uses when explaining prototyping.

[14:40] Hands-on activities Carlye uses to help people get a feel for prototyping: games, storyboarding, and roleplaying. 

[19:10] Her work in Singapore with the SUTD-MIT International Design Center and its Design Innovation Team.

[21:05] Carlye checks in with the leadership of organizations to find out how they will support and continue her work when she is finished with her workshop or consulting.

[22:18] Carlye talks more about the innovation hubs she worked with in Australia and Singapore.

[25:50] Her excitement about design methods, and two research-validated design tools she has collaborated on.

[26:26] The Prototyping Canvas.

[28:20] The Design Innovation with Additive Manufacturing (DIwAM) methodology.

[29:21] Carlye?s recipe for designing well - Wizard of Oz prototyping + Think Aloud testing + Affinity Clustering. 

[32:24] The benefits of Beginner?s Mindset.

[36:14] Learning, growing, and iterating is the backbone of productivity in work.

[39:30] The importance of Growth Mindset and space for reflection.

[39:45] Learning is enhanced when you give learning the time and space to be reflective.

[40:35] Design resources and references Carlye has used.

[45:25:] Where to learn more about Carlye and her work.



Links

Design Thinking 101

Fluid Hive Design Innovation

Carlye Lauff on the Web

Contact Carlye Lauff

Carlye Lauff on LinkedIn

Carlye Lauff on Medium

You Want to Learn Prototyping, First Bake a Cake by Carlye Lauff

Prototyping Canvas: Design Tool for Planning Purposeful Prototypes by Carlye Lauff, Kristin Lee Wood, and Jessica Menold

Design Innovation with Additive Manufacturing: A Methodology by K. Blake Perez, Carlye A. Lauff, Bradley A. Camburn, and Kristin L. Wood

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Desklight Learning

Mockups: a fast-paced game for people who build to think

theDesignExchange

Design Innovation

Luma Institute and Luma Workplace

A Taxonomy of Innovation: 36 human-centered design methods

IDEO?s Design Kit

Loft

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

  Public Sector Design + Outcome Chains + Prototyping for Impact with Boris Divjak ? DT101 E26   The Evolution of Teaching and Learning Design with Bruce Hanington ? DT101 E39

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-05-26
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A Designer's Journey into Designing for Health and Healthcare with Lorna Ross ? DT101 E45

Lorna Ross, the Chief Innovation Officer at VHI Health and Well-Being, discusses her career and work at DARPA, Motorola, MIT Media Lab, the Rhode Island School of Design, Mayo Clinic, and Accenture. You?ll learn about how her stellar design career unfolded, ways to get into designing for health, and system design in healthcare. Show Host: Dawan Stanford.

 

Show Summary

Lorna grew up in Dublin, Ireland, and attended the National College of Art and Design in Dublin, where she studied textiles and fashion design, with the intention to have a career in the clothing industry. In the course of continuing her career in fashion, she approached her local bank for a loan and was told the bank didn?t give loans to designers. Realizing that she had few business skills, she returned to school, this time in London, where she entered an industrial design program with a focus on computers and technology. She had her first foray into wearable tech with a project where she designed a glove that was also a phone.

As she was finishing up her degree, Lorna was picked up by a research lab in Palo Alto led by Paul Allen, who eventually became a co-founder of Microsoft. This first job set the benchmark for the quality of the work environments she has looked for during her entire career.

At her first wearable tech conference in the early 1990s, Lorna was introduced to DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) via a presentation by Dick Urban. Their work felt like science fiction to her and seemed radical and experimental, and she found it fascinating. At that same conference, Lorna gave a presentation and afterwards, was immediately offered a job at DARPA, which she accepted. Lorna worked with many of the big names in military manufacturing, where she reviewed programs, critiquing them from a user perspective.

After DARPA, she took a break before continuing her design work and her work in wearable tech at Motorola. She moved on to MIT Media Lab a couple of years later. By this time, Lorna had been working in wearables for ten years, and was wanting a new challenge. By chance, she attended a meeting about the healthcare crisis, and a light bulb went off and she knew she wanted to turn her focus and work to healthcare. Her attempts to push for innovation in healthcare led to her being asked to run the design studio at the Mayo Clinic. She has been a driving force of healthcare innovation for more than two decades now.

Learn how Lorna has been at the forefront of creating healthcare design and reforming the healthcare industry, and her predictions on opportunities for designers in healthcare. Find out why she believes that medicine will change before the healthcare system changes, her take on virtual healthcare and the need for immediate healthcare, and her thoughts on the melding of AI and human healthcare.

 

Listen in to learn:

How Lorna landed her first job in design at DARPA Lorna?s view on why user-centric is one of the most important facets of design What Lorna found out about the unpredictability of people?s behaviors How she fell into her job at Motorola and why she left Julian Vincent and his role as Lorna?s mentor at Media Lab How Lorna became the ?Florence Nightingale? of healthcare design The future of AI and what role Lorna thinks machines will play in healthcare Why our healthcare system needs to be more meticulous about, and value, documentation in the healthcare system The role of system design in our healthcare system today

 

Our Guest?s Bio

Lorna Ross has thirty years of professional experience working on strategic design research activity, particularly in innovation lab environments. Over the past two decades, she's held creative leadership positions in five innovation groups that span a range of industry sectors from technology to healthcare. Her career has thrived at the intersection of design, science, technology, and industry, and she's an expert in planning, managing, and executing speculative research activity. She's effective at building and managing creative teams within corporate and institutional cultures, with an in-depth knowledge of experience, service, and systems design methodology. She enjoys international recognition as a subject expert in this arena. Lorna has worked in both industry and academic environments and is proficient in the cultures, language, protocol, and conventions of both.

 

Show Highlights 

[02:21] Lorna talks about her pathway to a career in design.

[06:18] Her journey from fashion design to working with Paul Allen.

[07:58] Lorna tells the story of the first wearable tech conference she attended in the early 90?s.

[09:45] How Lorna secured a job with Dick Urban at DARPA.

[11:39] Her experience working and living with Navy SEALS for six months. 

[14:00] How she established credibility in an organization that didn?t see her as important.

[17:07] Lorna?s move to LA after she left DARPA.

[19:55] Her work at Media Lab.

[24:00] Lorna?s experience in a meeting for the Royal Academy for Health and her design ?Aha? moment.

[27:58] Her experience teaching in India at the National Design Institute.

[31:13] The offer from Accenture that offered Lorna the chance to return to Dublin.

[33:28] The use of design and opportunities for designers in the healthcare space.

[38:27] Lorna?s predictions about changes in healthcare based on her experiences.

[40:00] Her thoughts on telemedicine, technology, and home-based care in healthcare.

[43:00] The future of AI and what role she thinks machines and digital spaces will play in healthcare.

[46:40] How we might interact with healthcare machines and AI in the future.

[49:53] The value of the Service Design Network, and in talking with other like-minded people working on similar problems.

[50:34] The problem in design of not sharing and exchanging information and insight.

[51:15] Comparing the design community and scientific community with regards to documentation of work and a collective intelligence.

[55:15] System design in healthcare today and what role system design should have in the current healthcare system.

 

Links

Design Thinking 101

Fluid Hive Design Innovation

Lorna Ross on LinkedIn

Lorna Ross on Twitter

The Service Design Network

Fjord Kitchen Talks: Service Design in Health and Healthcare

SDGC14: Design as an Agent for Change in Complex Systems

Amplify Innovation: Re-designing healthcare

Inspirefest 2016: Making the invisible visible as a designer in healthcare

SDGC18: How technology is reshaping design and rewiring designers

RTÉ Ireland interview with Lorna Ross: Meet the inventors building tools for Ireland's vulnerable people

Grand Designs: Lorna Ross

Why Design Ireland interview with Lorna Ross: Innovation Leader

Design Thinking Ireland Profile

Inspirefest 2016: Innovation is not about good ideas, but timing

Irish Tech News: Lorna Ross Explains Future Trends in Design and Ways to Design for Positive Change

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Designer's Role in Healthcare & Public Health + Studio Thinking with Jess Roberts ? DT101 E21

Nursing + Service Design + Healthcare Innovation with Brittany Merkle ? DT101 E38

Healthcare Design Teams + Wellness + ScienceXDesign with Chris McCarthy ? DT101 E24

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

  Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-05-12
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Designing Health Systems + Creating Effective Design Workshops with Sean Molloy ? DT101 E44

Sean works in the healthcare industry as a Director of Patient Quality Experience at North York General Hospital in Toronto, Canada. We talk about Sean?s evolution into design thinking, how he dug deep and studied design, and how he felt that moving into this way of thinking was natural for him. Sean speaks of his career movement at North York General Hospital, how he integrates design into every aspect of the hospital, and Sean?s dream of creating a healthcare system that feels right to everyone. Show host: Dawan Stanford.

Show Summary

Sean has been working in healthcare for 25 years, and currently works at a large community hospital. The element he enjoys the most is the ability to positively impact people?s lives every day. He made his way into quality improvement and continued to move up the ladder to his current position. 

His journey into design started with listening to a presentation from the Vice President of Innovation at Kaiser, who came to Sean?s hospital to give a talk about leveraging design and design thinking. Sean shifted his process to design thinking and started to integrate design thinking into his position with cancer research. In his Master?s program, he learned how to think about innovation and how to map out an innovation plan, then seeing where design fits into the project.

We?ll talk about how to create a design thinking workshop, why people-centered innovation is now popular in healthcare, and how Sean believes healthcare can create a better future. Show Host: Dawan Stanford

Listen in to learn:

How to move towards human-centered care and the tools and methods to create design-centered solutions Why Sean found power in designing with people who weren?t in the healthcare field The foundational elements of healthcare and design Reasons why change and change management is complex in healthcare How design and design thinking have come to a critical mass in healthcare

Our Guest?s Bio

Sean is the Director of Quality, Patient- and Family-Centered Care and Patient Flow at North York General Hospital in Toronto, Canada. He holds a Master?s of Design degree from OCAD University in Toronto, with a research interest in how health systems are using design for innovation and improvement.

He also teaches in the Design for Health program at OCAD and mentors many students through internships and studio courses at the hospital, advancing the organization's academic mandate while offering students real-life opportunities to hone their design skills and build their careers.

Sean is passionate about the potential of people-centered innovation in healthcare, and he has led multiple design engagements over the last 10 years, spanning from the individual level to systems-level innovation. He is committed to advancing patient and community voices into health system transformation, and leveraging design as a critical enabler of building a brighter future for those living in our communities.

Show Highlights 

[02:00] Sean explains his transition from multiple healthcare roles to his current role of quality control.

[04:37] He remembers the VP from Kaiser coming to speak at his workplace and how it sparked his interest in design.

[05:48] Sean decides to pursue his Master?s in Design in Toronto, Canada.

[08:03] He describes how coursework for his Master?s in Design shaped how he thinks about healthcare and design

[10:13] How innovation is playing out in Sean?s current work.

[15:06] Co-creating, co-designing, and co-exploring design solutions.

[24:12] Advice Sean gives to designers who are about to apply service design inside a healthcare system.

[26:15] The heart of the designer?s role in a healthcare system.

[28:21] How to make the most out of making systems visible.

[32:27] The importance of revealing causal loops inside a system.

[34:23] What Sean learned from studying over 30 design labs inside healthcare organizations. Why these labs often fail.

[40:45] How to contact Sean and his social media platforms.

 

Links

Design Thinking 101

Fluid Hive Design Innovation

Sean Malloy on Twitter

Sean Malloy on LinkedIn 

A Review of Design Labs as a Model for Healthcare Innovation by Sean Molloy

North York General Hospital

OCAD: Design for Health

This is Service Design Doing

Book Recommendation: Design for Care: Innovating Healthcare Experience by Peter Jones

Book Recommendation: Thinking in Services: Encoding and Expressing Strategy through Design by Majid Iqbal




Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Designer's Role in Healthcare & Public Health + Studio Thinking with Jess Roberts ? DT101 E21

Nursing + Service Design + Healthcare Innovation with Brittany Merkle ? DT101 E38

Healthcare Design Teams + Wellness + ScienceXDesign with Chris McCarthy ? DT101 E24

________________

 

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-04-28
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Adding System Awareness to System Design to Your Innovation Stack with Julie Guinn ? DT101 E43

Julie Guinn combines design, research, strategy, and systems thinking to help teams build innovation capabilities, solve complex business challenges and deliver delightful, intuitive product experiences. We discuss systems awareness, leading design work inside complex systems, and ways to pull system awareness and system design into your innovation efforts. Show host: Dawan Stanford.

Show Summary

Julie defines the differences between systems and complex adaptive systems, and how the many elements that are highly interconnected in complex adaptive systems create complexity and how that impacts the way you approach the design process. She talks about her first foray into designing for healthcare, and how she quickly discovered that none of the typical tools in a design thinker?s toolkit were working. Her discovering  Designing for Care by Peter Jones started her on the path of learning about systems and system-centered design, which led to a whole new skillset and toolbox of methods specifically geared towards designing systems and designing inside systems. 

She discusses the unique challenges of designing for systems and how multiple phases and iterations are key when implementing change in complex adaptive systems. She also talks about some clients that were more challenging when it came to design implementation, and how some companies weren?t ready for design, and what she did to overcome these challenges.

Julie talks about how to be intentional when building a plan for convening and facilitating systems design experiences, and why you should think differently when you plan projects, especially when considering how much time each step will take.

Listen in to learn:

Differences between systems and complex adaptive systems Critical parts of complex adaptive systems and the elements they encompass Mapping systems and how you can use mapping systems in design Types of considerations to think about when designing for healthcare systems When you need a system-centered practice as opposed to a design-centered practice Ways to address obstacles in client work Timescale and system change with placing new interventions in place Why you should break optimized systems around your target outcomes What can you do if you find yourself in a much more complicated system than you anticipated?

Our Guest?s Bio

Julie Guinn is a User Experience Research Principal at Dell Boomi, where she focuses on understanding complex enterprise data ecosystems. She has 20 years of experience leading human-centered design and research in technology and healthcare organizations, including Microsoft, Intuit, the University of Pennsylvania Medical System, and Elsevier. Her collaborative, human-centered approach is founded on a passion for understanding human behavior and a deep belief in the transformative power of design. 

Julie?s first experience with design came from watching a PBS Nova episode on the development of new snack foods when she was a teenager. Watching the research team ask consumers questions about snacks hooked her interest. She holds a Master's degree in Human-Centered Design from the Illinois Institute of Design and a Bachelor's degree in Human Factors from Tufts University.

Show Highlights 

[03:30] Julie talks about her path to a career in user experience and enrolling at Tufts University.

[04:56] Defining Systems Design and the multiple fields of study which are encompassed in this career.

[05:56] Julie defines the differences between systems and complex adaptive systems. 

[08:18] Systems and mapping systems commonly found in design projects today.

[10:14] Considerations when designing healthcare using mapping systems.

[14:20] The ?invisible furniture? that can get in the way when designing healthcare systems.

[16:07] Aspects to build into your design program for healthcare design.

[19:45] The importance of understanding incentive structures that influence behavior in systems..

[23:05] Creating space to work inside complex adaptive systems.

[26:06] How setting boundaries on where you will work inside complex adaptive systems improves your success chances..

[27:37] What works well in the realm of collaboration for people and teams.

[31:40] How can you make the system visible to everyone using it?

[34:44] Changes and impacts that happen when people see the systems they inhabit.

[38:38] Advice for those who are finding themselves in a much more complicated system than they expected.

Links

Design Thinking 101

Fluid Hive Design Innovation

Julie Guinn on the Web

Julie Guinn on Twitter

Julie Guinn on LinkedIn

Service Design Network Talk

TISDD stakeholder mapping method

Book Recommendation: Designing for Care

Book Recommendation: Thinking in Systems

Book Recommendation: Systems Thinking for Social Change

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Designer's Role in Healthcare & Public Health + Studio Thinking with Jess Roberts ? DT101 E21

Nursing + Service Design + Healthcare Innovation with Brittany Merkle ? DT101 E38

Healthcare Design Teams + Wellness + ScienceXDesign with Chris McCarthy ? DT101 E24

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-04-14
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Learning Design + Designing for How People Learn with Julie Dirksen ? DT101 E42

Julie Dirksen is a learning strategist with more than 15 years of experience creating highly interactive e-learning experiences for clients, from Fortune 500 companies and technology startups to grant-funded research initiatives. Our conversation today is about learning design and learning in design, as well as her book, Design For How People Learn. We also talk about behavior change, practicing complex skills, and persuasive technology. Show host: Dawan Stanford.

Show Summary

Starting her career as an English as a Foreign Language instructor, Julie quickly became interested in finding out how technology could be used for learning. As an instructional designer for over a decade, Julie?s niche interest is in the area of behavior change. She has found that many experts have a deep body of knowledge, but lack the skills on how to teach others. Julie?s experience is that when people who do not have a teaching background try to create a curriculum or teach a class, they are merely mimicking teachers they?ve experienced, and not truly understanding the student?s learning process. What?s missing are learning strategies that a great instructor uses to help their students learn and grow.

As a result, instructors are not putting essential learning elements into their learning experiences. She felt that there needed to be a good book for instructors to learn from in order to add more effective teaching strategies to their toolbox. Her goal with the book was to provide information on the components that need to be considered before a teacher designs a learning experience so instructors start with a solid foundation.

Listen in to find out how :

Instructor knowledge gaps that can lead to an unsuccessful curriculum Habits, motivation, and other behavior changes Julie addresses in her book Julie breaks down learning into categories, and how each affects learning Avoidable mistakes instructional designers make when designing courses Pattern recognition?s role in student learning, and how long students need to see patterns before they become experts in their field Opportunities and emerging practices for design behavior change and learning design The components of persuasive technology

 

Our Guest

Julie Dirksen is an independent consultant and instructional designer who focuses on the science of sustainable behavior change. She has helped create learning curriculum for large companies, nonprofits and foundations, and higher education institutions. She's the author of Design For How People Learn, and she's happiest whenever she gets to learn something new. You can find her online at usablelearning.com.

 

Show Highlights 

[02:32] Julie introduces herself and gives a synopsis of her background.

[03:40] How Julie?s book happened and why.

[05:25] Underlying principles of what makes a class a good class for learning.

[07:58] The level at which Julie starts instructors out in her book and where she takes her content from that point.

[09:07] Julie?s suggestions for new instructors on where they should start when designing a curriculum and curriculum creation gaps she?s found in instructors.

[13:23] Avoidable mistakes people make when creating courses.

[16:56] Factors determining how many repetitions students need to learn their material.

[20:45] How should a student know when to look for a hypothesis, a correct answer, or to come to the conclusion there is no answer to their problem?

[22:50] Opportunities and emerging practices for designing behavior change and learning design.

[26:28] Behavior change design opportunities for learning designers.

[28:29] What is persuasive technology?

[33:15] How can professionals in the design field take on the challenge of technology change?

[36:28] Effective and non-effective strategies for teaching.

[38:32] How to structure learning experiences. The design recipe myth.

[42:58] Books that have influenced Julie?s career.

 

Links

Design Thinking 101

Fluid Hive Design Innovation

Usable Learning on Twitter

Design for How People Learn on Facebook

Usable Learning on the Web

Design Better Learning Online Course

Book Recommendation: Design for How People Learn

Book Recommendation: The Headfirst Books

Book Recommendation: Badass: Making Users Awesome

 

Other Episodes You Might Like

Behavioral Science + Behavior Change Design + Social Impact with Dustin DiTommaso ? DT101 E28 

The Evolution of Teaching and Learning Design with Bruce Hanington ? DT101 E39

Behavioral Design X Service Design with Anne van Lieren ? DT101 E40

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

 

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

 

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-03-31
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Innovation in Nursing Education + Design Thinking for Health with Marion Leary ? DT101 E41

Marion Leary is the Director of Innovation at the Pennsylvania School of Nursing. We discuss innovation and nursing education, University of Pennsylvania?s free online Design Thinking for Health platform, nurses as innovation leaders, and why storytelling matters. Show host: Dawan Stanford.

Show Summary

Design thinking was not Marion?s first focus. She was a researcher for 13 years before taking the role of Director of Innovation at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She has a dual degree, with a Master?s in Nursing and Public Health. Marion is currently pursuing her Ph.D., focusing on innovation and design thinking around cardiac arrest and bystander response. She is interested in using design thinking to solve problems in nursing and healthcare.

Marion enjoys the empathetic, human-centered approach of creatively solving problems in health and healthcare, which connects with nursing. She is a leader in design thinking and created the course Innovation and Health Foundations of Design Thinking using a flipped-classroom, active-learning approach. This interdisciplinary course at Penn can be taken by upper-level undergraduate or graduate students, regardless of their major.

Learn how Marion collaborates with other departments to create a successful design thinking cohort, how she coordinated the first Penn Nursing Innovation Accelerator Program, and how Marion is integrating design thinking into her curriculum.

Listen in to find out:

How nursing and design thinking are similar iterative processes More about the Innovation and Health Foundations of Design Thinking course How this design thinking course attracts students from many majors Marion?s experience on campus leading design thinking students Marion?s prediction for long-term trends in nursing and innovative design

Our Guest?s Bio

Marion Leary is the Director of Innovation at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Nursing. As the Director of Innovation at Penn Nursing, she works to amplify and educate nurses as leaders in health and healthcare innovation, recently launching a free, online, open access platform called Design Thinking for Health. Ms. Leary is a member of the American Nurses Association's Innovation Advisory Committee, a Founding member of the Society of Nurse Scientists, Innovators, Entrepreneurs and Leaders (SONSIEL), and a member of the American Heart Association's Emergency Cardiovascular Care Innovation Subcommittee. This past August 2019, she was named as an Influencer of Healthcare winner in the category of Excellence in Innovation by the Philadelphia Inquirer.  In 2017, she was named Geek of the Year for her outstanding achievements in Philadelphia's vibrant geek community in the areas of innovation, technology, and activism.

Show Highlights 

[02:22] Marion walks us through her journey to her current position today.

[04:30] How nursing and design thinking are similar processes.

[06:11] Marion describes the design thinking course.

[09:12] Student experience in the design thinking classroom at University of Pennsylvania.

[11:10] Marion?s experience leading design thinking on campus at University of Pennsylvania

[12:30] The first Penn Nursing Innovation Accelerator Program.

[14:05] Her prediction for long-term trends in nursing and innovative design.

[17:14] How do others outside of nursing use Marion?s design thinking resources?

[21:45] Focusing on storytelling as an integral part of design thinking.

[24:49] How healthcare leaders and designers can support nurses in their role.

[27:28] The type of listening that comes with nursing training.

[31:44] Scope of practice and human-centered design.

[35:45] How Marion is integrating design thinking into her curriculum.

[39:14] Resources to use for learning first-aid and first response techniques.

Links

Design Thinking 101

Fluid Hive Design Innovation

Design Thinking for Health

Design For Health at UPenn

UPENN nursing 

IDEO

Health Design Thinking by Bon Ku and Ellen Lupton

Design resources at UPenn

Marion Leary on Twitter

Marion Leary on the Web

Marion Leary Nursing Profile

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Designer's Role in Healthcare & Public Health + Studio Thinking with Jess Roberts ? DT101 E21

Nursing + Service Design + Healthcare Innovation with Brittany Merkle ? DT101 E38

Healthcare Design Teams + Wellness + ScienceXDesign with Chris McCarthy ? DT101 E24

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-03-17
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Behavioral Design X Service Design with Anne van Lieren ? DT101 E40

Anne van Lieren is a service designer and behavior design enthusiast. We talk about her path to joining Livework in the Netherlands as a service designer, where service design and behavioral design are converging, examples from her work, and what happens when you add behavioral design to journey mapping.  

Anne discusses her path to Livework with Dawan Stanford, your podcast host. She started working part-time through Livework through the University of the Netherlands and eventually started working at Livework Design full time. Anne worked on numerous projects, including helping organizations to adopt design principles and practices, and innovation projects optimizing current client services or building new service pathways.

Show Summary

With her bachelor?s degree in design from the University of the Netherlands, Anne moved on to Strategic Project Design, which was mostly focused on Service Design. While working on many user research projects, she developed an interest in psychology and behavior, and in understanding why people behave in specific ways. So, she decided to start looking into behavioral science and how this applied to service design.

Find out how Anne bridges the understanding gap for clients within the context of mindset, why she believes experiences are the key to training her client?s mental mindset, and why she focuses on the human-centered mindset. Learn how Anne teaches her clients to be more collaborative, think across departments and stakeholders, and encourages companies to be more experimental.

Learn how Anne:

Uses situation-specific prototypes for solutions in the workplace Teaches companies how to use new and existing tools for design Works with creative agility and the positive design that results from working the creative mental muscle Specifies the types of mindsets she focuses on in the context of experimental experiences with her clients Deals with the expectations of clients looking for solid answers Frames the dynamics involved in the design thinking process Incorporates behavioral design in the design thinking process to influence others in their behavior Builds and designs co-design workshops

 

Our Guest?s Bio

Anne is a service designer and behavioral expert at Livework Studio. She leverages insights from behavioral science and Livework?s expertise in service design to create environments that make customers aware, active, and able to make better decisions. By fundamentally understanding behavior and designing behavioral interventions, she helps organizations to create a durable impact on behavior change. Her research into nudging was published at a major international conference on design research.

 

Show Highlights 

[02:27] Anne?s path to becoming a service designer.

[03:30] How Anne?s journey took her to working with Livework Design.

[05:01] What process does Anne implement to assist clients in understanding mindset?

[06:38] Anne speaks about creative agility ? the creative mental muscle.

[12:12] The source for Anne?s enthusiasm for design based on working with her students on design projects.

[13:52] How incorporating behavioral science basics is beneficial for design thinking.

[16:51] An emotional hot state example and how to design more thoughtful interaction with nudges..

[19:55] Nudges and rational overrides in the context of behavioral science.

[22:31] Negotiations on the delivery side and how Anne handles this conversation.

[24:17] Building and designing co-design workshops.

[27:00] Advice Anne gives for others building co-design workshops.

[29:52] How Anne started using journey maps during her thesis.

[33:31] Anne?s prediction for service design?s future and role.

[36:32] Working on difficult social issues.

 

Links

Design Thinking 101

Fluid Hive Design Innovation

Livework Design Studio

Anne van Lieren at Livework

The Behavioural Insights Team Annual Update Report 2017?18

Podcast: You are not so smart

Recommended Books: Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness by Cass Sunstein & Richard Thaler

SDGC19 | Anne van Lieren: Customer Behaviour by Design - Influencing Behaviour Beyond Nudging

Contact Anne van Lieren

Anne van Lieren on Twitter

Anne van Lieren on LinkedIn

 

Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like

Teaching and Learning Service Design for Designers and Non-designers with Maurício Manhães ? DT101 E34

Service Design in Healthcare Inside Multiple Business Contexts with Jessica Dugan ? DT101 E22

Nursing + Service Design + Healthcare Innovation with Brittany Merkle ? DT101 E38

Behavioral Science + Behavior Change Design + Social Impact with Dustin DiTommaso ? DT101 E28

________________

Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan

Free Download ? Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps

Innovation Smart Start Webinar ? Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!

2020-03-03
Länk till avsnitt

The Evolution of Teaching and Learning Design with Bruce Hanington ? DT101 E39

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. In today's episode I am joined by Bruce Hanington. He remembers being introduced to design as a small child with his father being a Commercial Designer. Initially headed for a career in architecture, his journey took a detour as an undergrad when he ended up graduating with a degree in Applied Psychology. But Bruce realized he wanted to get into design, and that he wanted to be on the creative side instead of just studying design. During his graduate work in industrial design, he continued his interest in dealing with the more human factors of design, primarily, how design affects everyday encounters and life.

 

After emerging with an Industrial Design education coupled with Applied Psychology, he landed in academia in the School of Design as a part of the Industrial Design core, able to teach in all the aspects of teaching he loves best, including form giving, human factors, and understanding the interpretation of objects with meaning and significance. His recent promotions included an appointment to the Head of Design at Carnegie Mellon six months ago.

 

Bruce believes technology, and the products which are a part of our life now as a direct result of technology, are the biggest game-changers for design thinking. The orientation of work toward social causes, and designing for social good, has become an established part of design thinking.

 

On disciplinary boundaries, ?I think you see a broadening of boundaries so regardless of what form of design you may have a particular passion for and how you might study it, ultimately I think that designers have a more broad-based understanding of design and problem solving in general, and design methods, approaches and practices can be applied to almost any design.?

 

Bruce has seen a shift in design methods over time, especially in the surge of information via books and online courses. He recently authored his own book on design thinking, ?Universal Methods of Design.? There?s been a shift in design thinking to design responsibly for everyday living to enhance people?s lives.

 

Listen in to find out the new hurdles of design thinking, what new companies are looking for concerning the design thinking process, and why design thinking is more of a philosophical approach. Find out Bruce?s opinion on which methods or approaches to design have changed the most in the past decade.

 

Bio

Bruce Hanington is a professor and head of the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Prior to this, he was director of graduate studies, and program chair of industrial design. Bruce has dedicated his teaching and research to methods and practices for human-centered design, with an emphasis on design ethnography, participatory design, and the meaning of form in context. 

 

In addition to working with industry partners through collaborative projects and executive education, his work has been published in Design Issues, The Design Journal, and Interactions, with chapters in Affective Sciences in Human Factors and Human-Computer Interaction, and The Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Design. Bruce is co-author of the book Universal Methods of Design: 100 Ways to Research Complex Problems, Develop Innovative Ideas, and Design Effective Solutions.

 

In This Episode

[01:06] How Bruce arrived to where he is today.

[05:32] Bruce?s recent promotions in the design field.

[06:35] Factors which Bruce believes are having a significant impact on design in the classroom.

[08:45] Components which are a factor of design maturing in the United States. 

[10:21] How Bruce has seen design research methods shift over time.

[13:34] Wrestling with the ?rush to artifact.?

[16:48] Companies are looking for ways to design more creatively, flexibly, and collaboratively.

[18:45] Challenges brought to the design thinking table, and responses that work well.

[23:11] Changes and updates that Bruce has recognized in the newest edition of his book.

[28:20] Where students are headed in the future, and what will they need to be equipped with to succeed in design thinking.

[35:38] What needs to happen at the personal level for students and professors.

[38:52] How you can contact Bruce and learn more about his work. 

 

Links and Resources

Bruce Hanington on LinkedIn

Bruce Hanington on the Web

Bruce Hanington at CMU

Bruce Hanington's Research

Bruce Hanington's articles on Academia.edu

Design Research Methods: a Repository of Research Methods for Design

An interview with Bruce Hanington on Medium

Design for America

Elon By Design at Elon University

Center for Design Thinking at Elon University

 

Books Recommended

Universal Methods of Design: 100 Ways to Research Complex Problems, 

Develop Innovative Ideas, and Design Effective Solutions by Hanington, Bruce & Martin, Bella

The Pocket Universal Methods of Design by Hanington, Bruce & Martin, Bella

2020-02-18
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Nursing + Service Design + Healthcare Innovation with Brittany Merkle ? DT101 E38

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today's 

Guest is Brittany Merkle. Her design path started at the University of Virginia in the College of Arts and Sciences. During her first semester, her grandfather was diagnosed with cancer. On weekend trips home, Brittany witnessed the incredible service Hospice offered. When she returned for her second year at college, she immediately changed majors and enrolled in nursing. Brittany shadowed nursing students and learned what nursing looked like as a career.

 

She jumped into qualitative research and realized she wanted her career to combine two things: 1. Creativity, and 2. Make a difference. "These two seemed very siloed in my mind," Brittany remarked.  She hadn?t yet considered fusing these two aspects into one career.

 

Brittany wasn't sure where she wanted to go for graduate school, when she came across the Savannah College of Art and Design. She started with Hospice Case Management, but continued to think of service design in relation to her profession. Brittany enrolled in the SCAD Master's program and started to unlearn her previous content she learned from her Bachelor?s degree, which was her biggest challenge. She was one of the first nurses to graduate from the SCAD program.

 

She was looking for a new approach to bring to the healthcare system, which she found as a lead innovation strategist with the University's healthcare team. Brittany wanted to make her mark in the system and to challenge herself with the design skills she has learned.

 

Bio

Brittany Merkle, RN, BSN, supports the innovation and design thinking efforts in UH Ventures. She graduated from the University of Virginia with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing with distinction, and is graduating from the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) with a Master of Fine Arts in Service Design.

 

She is one of the first nurses to graduate from SCAD, and the first in the country with this specific degree combination. She has experience in Hospice Case Management, and in acute and urgent care services as a practicing Registered Nurse before she began pursuing her Master's. Her thesis focused on service design as a lens for nursing innovation.

 

Brittany is passionate about the demystification of innovation and catalyzing innovative behavior amongst healthcare providers and caregivers. Her work is focused on enhancing patient and provider experiences through innovative care models and digital tools.

 

In This Episode

[01:13] Brittany?s background and path to design thinking. 

[03:40] Her realization of what she wanted to do with her career.

[06:39] The turning point for Brittany, where her learning became her unlearning.

[08:44] How SCAD spoke to Brittany?s imposter syndrome. 

[10:45] Brittany?s design internship.

[12:14] UH?s prototypical healthcare system.

[16:27] New design language Brittany is adapting to her new position.

[17:18] Unique superpowers when she is performing her fieldwork.

[19:33] Advice Brittany would give to other healthcare professionals who do not have a design background.

[27:49] Suggestions for faculty on the innovation side of healthcare.

[30:27] Resources that have helped Brittany along the way.

 

Links and Resources

SCAD | Savannah College of Art & Design Service Design Program

UH Ventures

Brittany Merkle on LinkedIn

Dustin DiTommaso?s podcast episode Episode 28, Behavior Change Design

 

Books Recommended

This is Service Design Doing by Marc Stickdorn

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

On Managing Yourself by Harvard Business Review

2020-02-04
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Design for America: Founding + Present + Future, Part 2 ? DT101 E37

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today's episode is part two of a two-part series on Design for America. Design for America is a nationwide network that supports design innovation for social impact. DFA was founded at Northwestern University, and is helping to shape the next generation of social innovators and student-led design-led studios on over 40 college campuses. Today, we'll speak to two guests about what Design for America is, why DFA exists, how DFA works, and what the future may look like at Design for America.

We start our episode talking to Kelly Wisneski about her DFA experience, which began at Washington University in St. Louis during her undergraduate education. She knew she wanted to talk to people who were involved in Design For America in the Washington University chapter. She was working on a project related to food insecurity in St. Louis when she realized DFA would be her entry point into St. Louis. Kelly joined DFA during her first semester at university, and found herself on the leadership board in her second semester.

She enjoyed being part of the leadership board and having a hand in growing DFA from a small studio into a more extensive workshop. Kelly assisted others in getting their projects off the ground in her early stages of leadership. In 2019, Kelly has contributed to the building of nine new DFA studios. "DFA is not just design thinking projects, they are projects that are here to make an impact on the people that it matters to the most."

Our second conversation is with Liz Gerber. We first chatted with Liz about how DFA was launched. She worked in the research sector of the toy industry with kids, asking them how they would build their own toys. As a new professor at her university, Liz was not satisfied with just research and publishing. She wanted to launch a new idea that she had brewing. Liz yearned to create a unique educational and impact structure in which students were working directly with community members. She broke down the boundary between the classroom and campus and the ?real world,? giving students the ability to tackle and solve real-world community problems.

Bios

Kelly Wisneski is a Program Coordinator at Design for America, supporting DFA studios across the country and working to improve DFA's data systems. She graduated from Washington University in St. Louis, where she studied Architecture and Computer Science and led her local DFA chapter for 4 years.

Liz Gerber is the Faculty Director and Co-Founder at Design for America. The question that drives her is, "What can I do for others," and she continues to create communities that innovate collectively to tackle messy and meaningful problems. She is a design professor with a passion for understanding social interactions and practical applications for the technology.

 

In This Episode

[01:34] Kelly talks about her early DFA experiences.

[04:25] Advice Kelly gives for studios that are getting off the ground.

[07:27] What Kelly has learned and what her students have learned when they are a part of the project experience.

[10:57] Kelly highlights some DFA project components she enjoyed learning.

[11:57] How Kelly is working with mentors and guiding them through the process.

[15:08] Kelly?s advice if you want to start a DFA studio.

[16:37] Liz tells the DFA launch backstory.

[20:30] The students? first challenge: helping children with diabetes.

[22:15] Ten years later: Liz reflects on the work of DFA.

[23:40] Anniversary party for DFA and the DFA chapter?s ripple effects.

[29:13] Open questions about the future for DFA.

 

Links and Resources:

Liz Gerber at Northwestern University

Liz Gerber on LinkedIn

Kelly Wisneski on LinkedIn

UC San Diego Design Lab

Contact UC San Diego Design Lab

Design for America

Northwestern University

Elon By Design at Elon University

Center for Design Thinking at Elon University

Design for America Washington University

DFA Receives Cooper Hewitt Design Award in 2018

2019-12-17
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Design for America: Students + Design Thinking + Community Impact, Part 1 ? DT101 E36

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today's episode is part one of a two-part series on Design for America. Design for America is a nationwide network that supports innovation for social impact. DFA was founded at Northwestern University, and is helping to shape the next generation of social innovators and design-led studios on over 40 college campuses. Today, we?ll speak to three guests about what Design for America is and what does the experience look like when a member participates in a Design for America studio.

We start our episode with Eric Richards explaining how he founded Design for America on the UC San Diego campus. Eric was interested in human-led design and, coupled with his interest in social impact, Eric started to search Facebook for others who had a similar desire in utilizing both fields interchangeably. He found a Good Design Lab founded by Don Mormont at UC San Diego. Many of the UC San Diego students who were interested in human-led design had worked at this lab. Eric liked the concept, applied to the university, and was accepted to the program.

Through this lab and Don's involvement, many design classes were available to students. Eric joined Good Design Lab as a sophomore - the year after the lab was founded - and took the introductory design class. During his journey with Good Design Lab, Eric became part of a very tight-knit community. He was grateful to have found a community that, like Eric, valued using their skill set for social impact.

Andrew Demas discovered DFA by accident while he was a student. He had a friend who was involved in DFA, and one day Andrew visited the Good Design Lab. He fell in love with the process and how the process affects social impact. DFA taught Andrew how to find out who your user is, gaining empathy for the user, and developing a solution for someone else. His new perspective not only changed the way he solved problems in real-world applications, it also changed his view of how he thinks about his curriculum at school, and changed the way he works towards coming up with solutions.

Throughout this time, Andrew was connected to many other students who had a passion for design and for giving back to their community in a sustainable way. He was able to put his newfound skills to use when he and his classmates rebuilt a community center that was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. Andrew felt that DFA gave him his best college and learning experience in university, and he?s passionate about his alumni board and networking for future leaders of design thinking and to get more corporations involved with DFA.

William Moner is a faculty member who sponsors a DFA Studio at Elon University. Dawan Stanford approached William to mentor and encourage students to engage in the design process. William talks about the process of creating a DFA Studio, using DFA guides, and bringing together the efforts of everyone involved to make DFA happen on campus. He also discusses the challenges of mentoring and recruiting students for DFA.

 

Bio

Eric Richards is starting his last year at UC San Diego, where he's studying Human-Computer Interaction and Design for Social Innovation. His interest is in design that empowers communities and advances equity and sustainability. He currently leads Design for America at UCSD, and advises undergraduate humanitarian engineering projects on campus.

Andrew Demas is a Senior Managing Consultant in IBM's Digital Strategy & IX practice and is also the digital account partner for one of IBM's top telecommunications clients. As an IBM Design Thinking Leader, he runs the New York Design Thinking Chapter. His passion for design started with DFA; he served as President of the Barnard-Columbia Design for America Studio for three years, and he currently sits on the DFA Alumni Board. 

William Moner is an Assistant Professor of Communication at Elon University and is the faculty mentor for the Elon Design for America studio. He holds a Ph.D. in Radio-Television-Film from the University of Texas, and his research focuses on emerging methods of storytelling and interactive media production through open software platforms and systems.

 

In This Episode

[01:28] Eric tells his story of how he founded Design for America at UCSD. 

[02:54] Eric?s early experience with DFA chapter on campus.

[05:15] How Eric foresees using his skills in his work in the future.

[06:31] How Eric came into and is currently developing his need-finding skills.

[09:09] The value Eric finds in DFA and his DFA experience. 

[13:40] Andrew?s transformative experience with DFA on his university campus.

[15:43] Andrew?s most memorable project to date, and the skills Andrew and his classmates employed to this project, and what he learned from DFA.

[20:03] Andrew and his passion project with DFA.

[26:44] Students start to bring DFA to Elon University.

[32:30] Wicked problems in the DFA Studio at Elon University.

[34:28] William?s advice on how to mentor at a DFA Studio.

[38:58] The work of DFA and who William is grateful for at DFA.

 

Links and Resources

UC San Diego Design Lab

Contact UC San Diego Design Lab

Design for America

Elon By Design at Elon University

Center for Design Thinking at Elon University

Bernard-Columbia Design for America

William Moner

Andrew Demas

Eric Richards

2019-12-12
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Integrating Engineering, Design and Business with Tony Hu ? DT101 E35

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I'll be interviewing Tony Hu, who is the academic director at MIT?s Integrated Design and Management Master?s program. We?ll be talking about how Tony discovered design, human-centered design?s impact on students, and MIT?s unique program combining design and engineering management.

We start our episode during Tony?s high school career, with his passion for writing. He started on the journalism team and edited the school newspaper. Additionally, he was interested in gadgets - this was during the Sony Walkman era. Tony was interested in working on a similar technology at the time. His father was an engineer and was a big influence on Tony?s career. He heard MIT was the route to take if he was serious about engineering, so he applied and was accepted, to the dismay of his journalism teacher.

While at MIT, Tony studied transistors and Maxwell?s equations, which was not an enjoyable experience for him. He stuck through the course and found an interesting opportunity with an internship from the media lab working with the ?newspaper of the future.? He graduated with an electrical engineering degree; however, he wasn?t actually interested in the field. Tony wanted to learn about other aspects of products and interviewed with IBM in Boston as a Systems Engineer. When he started getting bored selling computers, he decided to look into a career in advertising. He was pursuing a bookstore for advertising books when just a few shelves down he discovered books on industrial design and product design. He found out about night classes at a local college and was hooked! After talking with several people, he found out about the Stanford program and fell in love with Stanford.

Tony talks about the challenges he faced in the early 1980s in the industrial design career. He realizes that students today are challenged with finding multiple solutions instead of just one engineering solution. Students are having to change their mindset and thinking, to offer numerous solutions. Another challenge is interviewing others, especially when they themselves are an introvert.

During his journey, Tony has designed toys and been a consultant to numerous companies. He was the first designer and product developer at a small company that sold baby products. At this first position, he learned the value of testing products. He then went through a succession of companies, exploring his passion for working with toys. His primary interest was to see a product all the way through from design to marketing, and he still wanted to stay in the toy field.

He started his own company creating toys and licensing them out to companies. One of his crazier designs was a bodysuit with casters which you could use to roll down a road! Another design he created was breathable, more comfortable protective gear for rollerblading.

Throughout this time, Tony taught Visual Design at Stanford. He met his wife, and 13 years later when she was expecting her first child and needed to find a teacher for her classes, she suggested her husband for the position. He ended up teaching several of her classes. Through his wife and teaching, he met Matt Kressy, who is an industrial designer from the Rhode Island School of Design. Matt went on to start a design program at MIT and invited Tony to check it out. A few years later, Matt asked him to join the program.

 

Bio

Tony Hu is the Academic Director of MIT's Integrated Design & Management Master's Program. As an entrepreneurial leader with 20+ years of experience as head of product development at both startups and large corporations, he has brought over 200 consumer products to market globally, including electronics, appliances, toys, and sporting goods, and is a champion of design, creativity, and innovation. He?s also an inventor, with 18 patents and 22 products he designed and licensed himself.

For the past 13 years, Tony has taught design thinking as a lecturer at MIT and Stanford. He earned his Masters in Product Design at Stanford and his bachelor in Electrical Engineering at MIT, where he conducted research at the Media Lab. As a teacher, he is a rarity: an engineer with a background in both design and business. Tony loves sharing his holistic approach to product design with students.

 

In This Episode

[01:05] Tony talks about his origin story in design and how he started on the path to design.

[05:07] How he landed a job at IBM and his experience at IBM in sales.

[07:01] Tony?s introduction into industrial and product design.

[08:30] Challenges Tony encountered in the early years of working in design.

[11:58] Tony talks about his first product development position and his takeaways from product development.

[16:04] Tony?s steps further down his design journey, focusing mainly on toys.

[20:18] Before the .com boom - more history and working with different companies.

[25:05] Tony talks about meeting Matt and how working with Matt influenced Tony?s path in design.

[27:28] How this unique program is attracting diverse learners.

[30:02] The process of design thinking on product development.

[35:33] Tony?s role in the transformation of teaching design thinking.

[39:08] Find out about Tony?s newest endeavor: Brainy Yak Labs

 

Links and Resources

Tony Hu LinkedIn profile

Brainy Yak Labs

MIT IDM on the web

2019-11-26
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Teaching and Learning Service Design for Designers and Non-designers with Maurício Manhães ? DT101 E34

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I'll be interviewing Maurício Manhães and talking about his design position at Savannah College of Art and Design, his work at the Service Design Network and as the group leader at the Design Academic Task Force.

In this episode, we talk about the crisis that caused Maurício to shift into service design, how service designers are learning their craft, and his work to create service design curriculum for non-designers.

We?ll explore Maurício's 15-year background in IT and marketing, and his reaction to having a failed project. He couldn't figure out why his project was received poorly by his client until he discovered that he didn't understand the people he was designing for. This was when he found design thinking.

Maurício was intrigued by how service design was based on a complex and systemic approach to social technical design. Through this revelation, he understood his approach to design and problem-solving was flawed. At this point, he decided to return to school. He received a Master's Degree in Knowledge Management, and then a Ph.D, and he then started teaching service design at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD).

Since Maurício joined SCAD, their program has gained over two dozen students, making their program one of the largest in the world. Students come with curious minds, wanting to know how they can involve stakeholders in the design process and have a better perspective on the social technical design context.

Maurício talks about how he and his department at SCAD are adding new courses pertaining to design to enhance the degree, including how innovation is understood in an adaptive system. The program is very demanding, resulting in two-thirds of the program's students being hired one year before they graduate.

This episode also offers a look at providing the perspective of the complex and active systems of design thinking to non-designers. Maurício explains how he conveys this complex concept to creators without a design background. He also delves into the ethics of service design, the illusion of being able to change a person?s behavior, and common issues first year designers have when they start their career.

 

Bio

Maurício Manhães is a Professor of Service Design at the Savannah College of Art and Design and an Associate Design Researcher at Livework and the group leader of the Service Design Network Academic Task Force. In 2015, he obtained a Doctoral degree in Knowledge Management with a focus on service innovation at the Federal University of Santa Catarina in Brazil in partnership with the Koeln International School of Design in Germany with the thesis "Innovativeness and Prejudice: Designing a Landscape of Diversity for Knowledge Creation." In addition to his professorship, he works on consultancy projects and conducts workshops, courses, and lectures on design, design research, and service innovation worldwide.

 

In This Episode

[01:10] Maurício?s journey from IT project management into design thinking.

[04:50] He gives background on SCAD department and his role in this department.

[06:54] SCAD department and how their cohort has grown.
[11:16] Curriculum changes to the complexity of the design program at SCAD.

[12:34] Maurício talks about why they are adding complex adaptive systems to the curriculum at SCAD.

[14:09] Two-thirds of students are hired one year before graduation.

[16:06] How service design theory and service design logic prepares students for design at high levels.

[17:53] How Maurício is bridging the gap between learning service design and the perspective of the complex and active systems of design thinking.

[22:24] Teaching service design to non-designers.

[27:02] Ethics of service design and how they play out among non-designers.

[38:13] Common threads on challenges that are faced by first year designers.

[40:41] The early days of design thinking. 

 

Links and Resources

Maurício on Twitter

Savannah College of Art and Design

Maurício on LinkedIn

Maurício on the Service Design Network

Maurício?s presentation on the Three Overarching Perspectives for Service Design at SDGC18, and the presentation slide deck: Three Overarching Perspectives for Service Design

Interview with Mauricio on the Design Decode website

2019-11-05
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Humble Design Leadership + Design Agency and Experience Design Evolution with Aleksandra Melnikova ? DT101 E33

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I?m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I?ll be interviewing Aleksandra Melnikova and talking about her position as Head of Experience Design at Publicis?Poke in London, England. In this episode, we talk about humble design leadership and how design is evolving to better serve our clients and the world. Aleksandra tells us about how her art, sculpture, and drawing training inform her work as a designer and leader. Today, we explore Aleksandra?s work and her team at Publicis?Poke in London, design agency evolution, how she leads an experience design team with a wide array of talents, and how she inspires by mentoring people outside work.  Aleksandra likes to start from a blank sheet of paper and accepting that she and her team have a great deal to learn from and with clients. She fosters the culture of not being afraid to ask questions and being blunt about the information and what is going right and wrong. She encourages her team to spend 80% of their time on questioning. She believes the answer she needs will come to her when the question is formulated in the right way. Aleksandra talks about design agencies approaches to the work, and noted agencies are getting away from presentation culture and moving towards collaborative approaches to working with clients. She enjoys going into a business and looking at their workflow as a point of reference to start her work with the client. ?We are communicators of connections in this world,? and Aleksandra believes these connections are systematic connections, and they more they are exposed, the better the end product. This episode also offers a look at the shift in approach to user design, and how the previous system of UX design was disjointed compared to today?s design thinking process of a team working together to manage the entire project. She talks about exposing research and data to clients that they have not synthesized into their operations, and how the data set is made into practical actions to solve problems. She also talks about how her team acts as a facilitator to the design thinking process. About Aleksandra Aleksandra?s mission is to bring the power of connected disciplines into design, research, and team management. Her background is in the Arts and Product Service Systems Design, her playground for creating new methods, tools, and approaches that frequently challenge existing structures and the status quo. Two of her biggest strengths are storytelling and system thinking. During the past 11 years, Aleksandra has worked from both the client and agency perspective and successfully delivered digital experiences for companies such as VISA, Lloyds, TSB, SKY, Aviva, VSO, GSK, and British Airways, and she has led the experience design team within Publicis?Poke. She has collaborated with UK universities, mentored at Global Service Jam, and has been a speaker on the topics of connections between literature, art, and design. In This Episode [01:30] Aleksandra?s journey in design thinking. [05:04] She describes the team she leads as Head of Experience Design at Publicis?Poke in London. [05:25] How Aleksandra brings out the best in her team, which has a wide array of talents. [06:58] Aleksandra coaches humility with her team, based on the ever-changing world and the lack of knowledge we have because our world changes so fast.  [08:56] How Aleksandra assists clients in adapting to this process of questioning when they are working together. [10:50] Tuning the relationship with the client when they haven?t worked with a team who uses design thinking. [13:06] How blurring the boundaries on design affects the work being done by her team. [15:03] Is there a shift in approach to experience design? [18:54] The five why questions Aleksandra uses when having conversations with her clients. [20:08] Viewing your project from the protagonist?s viewpoint is helpful with design thinking. [22:14] Elements and engagements that is making Aleksandra?s work possible. [24:09] How Aleksandra uses simple interviews and other elements to create valuable data for her clients. [26:45] The value of the journey in the process of design thinking and how Aleksandra is against selling deliverables. [30:41] Where can you find innovation in design thinking. [35:47] Advice Aleksandra gives to emerging designers.  [40:08] The ethical role expanding and emerging in the design process. [44:17] Thinking about the future and what is the worst thing that can happen if you say ?no? to an idea or action. [50:57] Use of technology and how technology can impact work. [52:21] Don?t get too focused on the mono tools or methods and using them for every project. [55:46] ?Best practice? means ?stop thinking?. [57:34] Looking forward to what can lead to transformation. Links and Resources Design for the Real World by Victor Papanek   Ruined by Design by Mike Monteiro   Aleksandra Meinikova on Medium Aleksandra on Twitter Aleksandra on the Web Find Aleksandra on LinkedIn Aleksandra at Women Talk Design Publicis?Poke
2019-10-22
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A Short Introduction to Design Thinking with Dawan Stanford ? DT101 E32

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I'll be giving you a brief introduction to design thinking. It starts with a story about Doug Dietz. In 2012, Doug was a principal designer at GE Healthcare.

Doug designed a new MRI machine. One day, observing the new model in action at a hospital, Doug encountered a distraught child who had to undergo an MRI. He found out that over 80% of children had to be sedated to receive an MRI. As an MRI machine designer, he felt some responsibility for this. He also saw an opportunity do better for children. So, he spoke with teachers and other professionals who interact with children on a day-to-day basis, asking them how he could make their experience in an MRI machine less traumatic. As a result of those conversations, Doug and his team found a way to modify  an MRI machine for children. They added stickers to the floor with water and rock on them. Covered the MRI with stickers that looked like wood planks and sails. Now, instead of a scary piece of hospital equipment, the MRI looked a lot like a pirate ship.. They even created a storybook that accompanied the themed MRI. Parents could read to their child the pirate ship adventure story ahead of their child?s scheduled appointment. These changes resulted in a decrease in the need for sedation from 80% to 27%.

Today, we explore how seeing the problem is an integral part of design thinking, and we?ll break down design thinking into process, methods, and mindset. The process is your step by step "rough" guide. With the methods, we have a bit more cohesion; design methods help us explore problems in specific ways, and guide us to ask questions in new ways in order to discover the right problems to solve. The mindset is something you have to practice your way into, in order to learn how to change your mindset.

At its most basic, design thinking is the discipline of finding human problems worth solving, and creating viable new options in response. In many ways, it's the discipline of helping people ask the right questions at the right time.

This episode also offers a definition design thinking that replaces creativity myths with truths about discipline and action. I break down the design process into Seeing, Solving, and Acting, and talk about why we should think about design from the perspective of the people we serve.

 

In This Episode

[01:26] Doug?s background in MRI science and his experience with a child getting an MRI.

[03:04] Over 80% of children need to be sedated to have an MRI or a CAT scan.

[06:15] Design thinking can be broken down into process, methods and mindset.
[07:07] What has design thinking given students, and how design thinking can shape curriculum and projects inside the classroom.

[08:02] The definition of design thinking.

[09:57] Creating viable new offerings and what is defined as ?new??

[12:11] Breaking down the design process into its three main components: seeing, solving and acting.

[15:09] Responses generated from a fixed mindset in opposition to the responses from a growth mindset.

[16:51] Everything is a prototype and designers are open to questioning how things work.

[20:17] What Doug was Seeing as he redesigned the children?s MRI experience.

[22:54] Delivering solutions based on what you are seeing.

 

Links and Resources

Elon By Design and The Center for Design Thinking, Elon University

Fluid Hive

Dawan Stanford on Twitter

Design Thinking 101 Podcast on iTunes, and on The Podcast App

Transforming healthcare for children and their families: Doug Dietz at TEDxSanJoseCA 2012

Ten Types of Innovation

2019-10-01
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Launching and Leading a University-wide Design Thinking Initiative with Danielle Lake ? DT101 E31

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I'm interviewing Danielle Lake. She is the Director of Design Thinking and Associate Professor at Elon University. As a feminist pragmatist, her scholarship explores the connections and tensions between wicked problems and the movement towards public engagement within higher education. Her current projects focus on exploring the long-term impact of collaborative, place- and project-based learning, design thinking practices, and pedagogies of resilience. Lake is co-editor of the book series, Higher Education and Civic Democratic Engagement: Exploring Impact, with Peter Lang Publishing.

 

Danielle started her journey by designing her own major; she called "designing life" her philosophy, relating to who we are and what we want to do. In her Ph.D. program, she uncovered "The Field of Wicked Problems," while working with her Ph.D. advisors Kyle White and Paul Thompson, looking at large-scale systemic crises needing a different approach. She had learned from many experts before discovering design thinking, and she asked herself how she could take her teaching, research, and service, and weave them together.

 

Today, we explore how design thinking has played out in Danielle's teaching, such as redesigning student outcomes so that a final product is a practical solution to a current issue. This way of teaching has flipped the classroom for Danielle, and she talks about how this methodology on student learning has been very impactful in her classrooms. Project-based, relational, and on-going learning experiences are critical ingredients for long-term learning. Early on, she faced some challenges: opening up to students, starting small, and finding ways to invite other experts in and allow them to lead with their expertise. Danielle is looking to continue to design courses to give students the time to delve into the work they value.

 

We'll also dig into the relationship between design and philosophy, and how they work together to give us a place to start in learning about our environment, being collaborative, and solving societal issues. Danielle also talks about what she hopes to accomplish in her professional relationships moving forward, and we?ll hear a little about Dawan's own journey in discovering design thinking and the creation of Fluid Hive and The Education Design Lab. Dawan also talks about how he was introduced to Elon by Design, and his process of discovering design thinking was part of the Elon culture, and the importance of having the space to learn with others who are practicing design thinking.



Learn More About Today?s Guest

Danielle Lake, Elon University

 

In This Episode

[02:26] Danielle?s journey into design thinking. 

[04:06] Working with her advisors in her PhD program.

[05:25] Discovering design thinking and applying this to new curriculum at Grand Valley State University.
[07:07] What has design thinking given students and how design thinking can shape curriculum and projects inside the classroom.

[09:17] Danielle?s study of the long-term impact on student learning.

[13:32] Danielle speaks about her early challenges when implementing design thinking in the classroom.

[17:20] Where Danielle is now with her new role at Elon.

[19:32] How Danielle helps her students to launch their work forward and apply their work in the community.

[21:05] Students carving out relationships in society, applying their work from university.

[22:11] Danielle?s perspective on the relationship between design and philosophy. 

[25:44] She asks, ?How are we going to step in and learn from our mistakes??

[26:39] What is Danielle hoping to achieve with her professional relationships?

[28:16] Dawan talks about where we want to take design thinking in the Elon University Program.

[30:45] Fluid Hive?s launch in 2008 with design work in higher education.

[32:55] Meeting Lambert and realizing Elon was serious about design thinking.

[39:00] The early days for Dawan at Elon.

[41:45] Placemaking and where is the Center going from here?

[44:58] Danielle reimagining how Elon can play a role in design thinking and building relationships to make institutions more fluid and dynamic.

[47:18] Benefits of partnering with other universities and public sectors to bring value and richness to the learning experience and community.

[50:34] Where you can learn more about Elon and Danielle.

 

Links and Resources

Elon By Design, Elon University?s Design Thinking Program

Recent publications by Danielle at Bepress

Service Design Network

Design For America

2019-09-03
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