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I Thought I Knew How: A Podcast about Knitting and Life

I Thought I Knew How: A Podcast about Knitting and Life

I Thought I Knew How is a podcast about learning what you thought you already knew in both knitting and life. Visit our website at IThoughtIKnewHow.familypodcasts.com.

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Episode 027: Theresa Drouin-Guerette

Anne sits down with Theresa Drouin-Guerette, a.k.a Terri Spins. Terri uses her spinning skills as a living history interpreter, teaches spinning across the United States, and writes for Ply, Spin-off, and The Wheel. Listen in as they talk about Terri's journey, breed-specific fiber, and more!

Please visit the show notes for links and photos related to the episode, and check out our Be a Booster page to learn how you can support the show!

2020-02-17
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Episode 026: Shave 'em to Save 'em

Anne reviews Vogue Knitting Live and Sandnes Garn yarn before sharing her newest obsession, the Shave 'em to Save 'em initiative by the Livestock Conservancy. Then, the time has come to wrap up the Maakin for the MRI knit along. A few songs, a few announcements. Have a listen!

Ways to support the show:

1. Please consider leaving a 5-star review and kind comments where you listen to the podcast. 

2. Patronize one of our sponsors:
Ashcroft Makers
Dropps Detergent

3. Consider becoming a direct patron.

4. Tell your friends about the show!

Thank you for listening!

2020-02-04
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Episode 025: Vogue Knitting Live

Anne takes you along to Vogue Knitting Live, 2020! Come along to hear some of the voices of vendors and attendees and get a sense of the show. Is it in the cards for next year? Maybe this episode will help you decide!

2020-01-21
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Episode 024: Maakin for the MRI

Anne shares the results of her Yarn Stash Destash 2019 and some things on her needles along with a review of Ashcroft Makers yarn, gives an update on her podcast listening project, goes through the prizes available to people involved in the Maakin for the MRI KAL, music and more!

2020-01-07
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Episode 023: All Sorts

In this episode, Anne shares some additional details about the upcoming Maakin for the MRI knit along, upcoming appearances, a yarn review of Brown Sheep's Stratosphere, and mail angst.

2019-12-24
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Episode 022: Resolve

Anne lays out her plan forward with her Master Hand Knitter Program. She reviews the Knitter's Pride SmartStix Interchangeable Needles, announces the winner of the Dorset Button kit from TJFrog, thanks her very first four patrons, gives details on the Maakin for the MRI knit along and a whole lot more. Listen for details, as well as a coupon code for 10% off your entire order from Needlepoint Joint when you add a kit for a Harriet's Hat to your order.

2019-12-10
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Episode 021: Christel Seyfarth and Loch Ness Knit Fest

Anne finishes her trip to Loch Ness Knit Fest and shares an interview with Christel Seyfarth, Danish designer and host of Fanø International Knit Festival. She also shares information on a knit-along starting January 1, 2020, that she will be co-hosting with Jana of the Purl Together video podcast.

2019-11-26
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Episode 020: Tania Ashton Jones and Loch Ness Knit Fest

In this episode, Anne got to talk to Tania Ashton Jones, also known as TJ Frog, about Dorset Buttons, a beautiful way to embellish your knits and more. Anne talks about traveling the Highlands, the classes she took at Loch Ness Knit Fest, a new certificate program from the Knitting Guild Association, and more. There is also a giveaway in this episode, so be sure to listen to the entire episode to hear how to enter!

2019-11-19
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Episode 019: Hazel Tindall

In this episode, Anne sits down to talk to Hazel Tindall ahead of Loch Ness Knit Fest. Hazel shares her experiences knitting as a teenager on Shetland when home production of knitwear was still a major industry. They also talk about the festival, Hazel offers advice to new knitters, and they hit on much more.

2019-11-12
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Episode 018: Shetland Wool Week, Part 2

In this episode, Anne shares her experience with the classes at Shetland Wool Week 2019. Also, in honor of Wovember, she shares a few sheep-themed songs. And, finally, she gives a heads up for a UFO-finishing knit-along coming in January, 2020.

2019-11-05
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Episode 017: Shetland Wool Week, Part I

In this episode, Anne shares the experience of being part of Shetland Wool Week, including the sense of community and the evening events.

Next week, she will share her experience in the classes she attended, so stay tuned for that.

2019-10-28
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Episode 016: Janette Budge

In this episode, Janette Budge sat down with Anne to talk about Fair Isle knitting on Shetland in the past and present, with special attention paid to the Shetland Peerie Makkers, a group dedicated to teaching knitting to school children using the old methods.

2019-10-23
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Episode 015: Harriet Middleton

Harriet Middleton, designer of the Harriet's Hat (and headband, fingerless gloves, gloves, mittens, and cowl!), sits down to talk to Anne about her knitting life before her fundraising for the Shetland MRI Scanner Appeal began, how the MRI Maakers started, the momentum behind her patterns, and the unintended good that has resulted from them.

2019-10-14
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Episode 014: The One During the Break

Anne checks in for a bit mid-hiatus to review Heat Wave, Alize EZ Wool, and the Sea Pinks hat pattern, as well as sharing what she's learned about Fair Isle knitting over the last month. Plus, she talks about her upcoming trip to Knitter's College (aka, Shetland Wool Week) and her invitation to speak at Loch Ness Knit Fest. If you see her at either, say hi!

2019-09-09
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Episode 013: The One Before the Break

Anne wraps up her time in New York, reviews Brown Sheep Cotton Fleece, and ties up a few loose ends before heading on hiatus. Listen for details about that and a giveaway!

2019-07-29
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Episode 012: Knit Out New York

In this episode, Anne shares the mixed bag that is the Master Hand Knitter questions, talks about knitting in New York, reviews Knitter's Pride Karbonz circular needles, announces a giveaway for all listeners no matter where they live, and more!

2019-07-16
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Episode 011: Hoppin' for Yarn

Anne has made some progress with the Master Hand Knitter Program, took part in the I-91 Shop Hop, reviews Tatamy DK by Kraemer Yarns and the Spring Treasure Bag pattern from their Festival Wear collection, shares more about Harriet's Hat and Headband, and provides you some music to knit by.

2019-07-02
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Episode 010: A Hodgepodge of Yarn

In this episode, Anne still needs to catch up on her Master Hand Knitting work. She shares a few podcasts that also relate to the MHK Program and talks about the effect of a stash-gone-awry. Plus, there's more about Harriet's Hat, a giveaway of some summery yarn, and music from The Suitcase Junket!

2019-06-18
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Episode 009: Catching Up and Keeping Up

009: Catching Up and Keeping Up

Released June 4, 2019

In this episode, Anne needs to catch up on her Master Hand Knitting work and uses podcasts to help her catch up with the online knitting community.

Winner-winner!

Congratulations to Sparky136 from Ravelry for winning the Episode 8 giveaway! She won by sharing some advice for new knitters.

A Good Project to Test the MHK Waters

Alex's Blanket is a simple baby blanket pattern that incorporates several of the stitch patterns and skills you need to demonstrate mastery of for the Master Hand Knitter Program. If you have been thinking about going through the program yourself, cast on for this project and give it your all! Pay close attention to your tension, research ways to improve, and get a sense for whether you'd enjoy the program.

If being hyper-aware of your knitting makes you feel anxious, maybe it's not the time. But if you enjoy the challenge and insight that comes from this "test," you should think about joining up!

Progress on the Master Hand Knitter Program

Anne doesn't want to talk about it. She does on the program, though. But, let's leave it lie for now.

Oldies but Goodies

While at the last few fiber festivals, Anne realized just how out of touch she got with the knitting community while she lived overseas. So, she's turned to podcasts--old podcasts--to get herself caught up.

Some of them don't hold up, or have disappeared, but others are still well worth a listen. If you haven't already, check out KnitCast, Cast On, or Knit Obsession with zKnits.

How often do you record your own thoughts and experiences? Don't let them disappear like so many of the knitting podcasts of the last 15 years. Little daily moments from everyday life is what historians and family come to treasure the most. Is it time for you to pick up a journal habit?

Harriet's Hat Knit-along

You've heard Anne talk about the Shetland MRI Scanner Appeal in previous episodes. Lately, Harriet Middleton has designed a hat to help raise funds for the appeal. The pattern has gone viral, and the Minnesota Knitter's Guild will be hosting a knit-along on their Ravelry group starting on June 8, 2019.

The guild is offering a cast-on prize and a completion prize. Visit the group for details. You'll need to buy the pattern to join in, and if you need yarn, The Woolly Thistle is selling kits at a discount and donating the proceeds to the cause, or you can get a kit from Northfield Yarn.

There are more details in the episode and at the Ravelry thread for the KAL.

Advice for Beginners

One of the ways to enter the giveaway last time was to offer advice for beginner knitters who hoped to improve their skills. Take a look at the Ravelry thread for a lot of great advice!

Giveaway

The giveaway for episode 9 is full of lovely things from the Massachusetts Sheep and Woolcraft Festival.

This selection of items from the Massachusetts Sheep and Woolcraft Festival will be yours if you win the Episode 9 giveaway!

This time, Anne tried to focus on the vendors who only sell at festivals to give you a truly unique offering. It has a set of Anne's handmade stitch markers, an anti-moth sachet, dyed wool fiber, a taster hank of yarn from Tidal Yarns, and felted acorns from Englishman Bay Trading Company.

This giveaway is only open to people with a mailing address in the USA. To enter, visit @IThoughtIKnewHow on Instagram and find the post for Episode 9. Follow @IThoughtIKnewHow and like the post. Tag as many people as you'd like in the comments, but only one name per post. Each of those things will get you one entry. To get 5 entries, share the episode post to your grid or stories, and tag @IThoughtIKnewHow.

The winner will be chosen with a random number generator on June 14, 2019 and announced in Episode 10 of the podcast on June 18, 2019.

Featured Music

The first song this week was "Things that I'll Keep" by Doug Hoyer. That was followed by "Waiting On" by I don't know who because the licensing company failed to include the proper attribution, but the lyrics were by Langston Hughes.

If you are a musician who would like a song featured on the program, or if you have comments or feedback, please contact the show at [email protected]

Support the Show

Order your laundry detergent from Dropps and support the show at no extra cost to you. Dropps is vegan, plastic-free, effective and less expensive than most of the brands in the grocery store, and it arrives at your door on a delivery schedule that works for you.

2019-06-04
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008: Seed Stitch Success

008: Seed Stitch Success

Released May 21, 2019

In this episode, Anne shares her experience signing up for Shetland Wool Week 2019, how she finally nailed her seed stitch, the winner of the episode 7 giveaway and more!

Winner-winner!

Congratulations to KnittyMoomin from Instagram for winning the Episode 7 giveaway. Please check your Instagram messages!

Shetland Wool Week Sign-ups!

Anne was up at 4:30 am on May 18th, and was able to get a class in every time slot she was hoping for when the Shetland Wool Week class registration went live at 5 am. Most of her classes relate to Fair Isle techniques, but she will also be taking classes in lace and Bohus knitting, as well as whittling her own shawl pin. She will be reporting back on her experiences there, so stay tuned for the episodes coming in October!

Because it's the 10th anniversary of Shetland Wool Week, there are many, many programs going on. Plus, often times, people overbook themselves for classes and sell their tickets on. So, if you're on the fence about going this year, there will still be plenty to do and see and a good chance that you'll be able to get in to a class.

If you will be attending this year, reach out to Anne and say hi!

Progress on the Master Hand Knitter Program

Anne continued to work on her seed stitch practice scarf over the last few weeks and finally had a breakthrough thanks to a video by Arenda Holladay. It wasn't Holladay's method so much as what she said. Watch the video below to see Holladay's fix and listen to the podcast episode to hear what worked for Anne. (Ok, ok... She found that tugging the yarn after working the purl stitch is what did the trick for her!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15ORNUlhgTM While this isn't the method that eventually worked for Anne, it's what sparked the answer for her!

Anne will be knitting up her official seed stitch swatch and moving along in the program! Stay tuned for further progress and tips!

Knitter's Pride Spring Charity KAL and CAL for Warm Up America!

What started as a baby blanket failed due to insufficient amounts of yarn. But no worries, Anne used the yarn for that failed project, along with all the remaining acrylic in her stash, to crochet 28 blocks for the Knitter's Pride Spring Charity KAL/CAL. Follow that link to get all the details on this project to support Warm Up America! The KAL/CAL launched on May 1 and runs until May 31! There's a chance to win a set of needles or hooks from Knitter's Pride, so get crackin'!

Anne had planned to send a few blocks, but when a baby blanket project failed because she didn't have enough yarn to finish it, she used the yarn to make some blocks to send to Warm Up America. Then she cleaned out the rest of her acrylic scrap yarn and ended up crocheting thirty blocks in all!

Upcoming Events -- Be Sure to Say Hi!

Anne will be heading to the Massachusetts Sheep and Woolcraft event on May 25. At noon, she will be at the sheep event area in case anyone wants to come by and say hi. Or just look for her in the crowd and say hello!

The I-91 Yarn Shop Hop is scheduled for June 27-30th. Anne will be hitting the yarn stores in the New Haven area on the 28th and in Massachusetts and Vermont on the 29th. If you see her, say hi! Or get in touch to coordinate a time to meet at one of the shops in those areas!

The next place Anne will be popping up is in NYC for 11 weekdays between July 9-25. Anne will be yarn crawling her way around Manhattan on many of those days. What's your favorite NYC yarn shop that she shouldn't miss? Drop her a line in the comments and let her know!

knitCompanion Review

Sally Holt, the genius behind the knitCompanion app, should be up for the Knitting Nobel Prize. That's a thing, right? knitCompanion works on iOS and Android devices and exists to make your knitting life so much easier.
The free version of the app helps you organize your patterns and track where you are in your charts or written instructions. Affordable subscriptions increase the usefulness of the app dramatically, though, adding the ability to create shortcuts and add information to patterns. You can also manipulate the keys and charts within the patterns. Five minutes of prep in knitCompanion can save you hours of frustrations in some of your more complicated projects.
It didn't take long for Anne to fall in love with the program. She uses it all the time. Listen to the episode below for an in-depth review of the features or subscribe through the podcast app of your choice.

Giveaway

The giveaway for episode 8 has a summery theme as we head into the end of May. One lucky listener will win a hank of Dragonfly Fibers Dance Rustic Silk in the Dragonberry colorway, a new copy of the Spring/Summer 2018 edition of Knitwear Magazine, a device stand from knitCompanion, and a set of stitch markers. Follow her on Instagram and join the Ravelry group for an entry each, and listen to the podcast to hear how you can get 5 more entries!

The giveaway for episode 8 has a summer theme! It's a copy of Knitwear magazine Spring/Summer 2018, a knitCompanion device stand, stitch markers and a hank of Dragonfly Fibers Dance Rustic Silk.

Featured Music

Both of the songs in this episode are from Torelli and the Fuse. The first was "Legacy," followed by "Forgive and Remember."

If you are a musician who would like a song featured on the program, or if you have comments or feedback, please contact the show at [email protected]

Support the Show

Order your laundry detergent from Dropps and support the show at no extra cost to you. Dropps is vegan, plastic-free, effective and less expensive than most of the brands in the grocery store, and it arrives at your door on a delivery schedule that works for you.

2019-05-21
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007: I'm Just a Teenage Knitter, Baby

007: I'm Just a Teenage Knitter, Baby.

Released May 7, 2019

In this episode, Anne realizes she knits like a teenager lives, and that's ok.

Winner-winner!

Congratulations to BohneJl on Ravelry who won the giveaway from episode 6! The prize was a bag from LittleComfortsAtoZ, a hank of hand-spun alpaca, and a set of stitch markers. Enjoy them!

To celebrate the winner coming from the Ravelry group, there was a bonus giveaway added for those who are members. Check the thread for details. This additional giveaway will likely be repeated in the future, so be sure to join the group

Progress on the Master Hand Knitter Program

Anne began work on her seed stitch scarf to practice for the swatch, and found that by pushing the stitches so the next few stitches were on the tapered area of the needle, she could create a more uniform fabric. Progress!

Ooh, la la! Not perfect, but getting better!

It also helped to only work on it when she can give it her complete attention. Multi-tasking has been relegated to the land of mythology, and Anne has learned this lesson herself, finding that when she gives her knitting her full attention, she creates a more consistent fabric.

Knitter's Pride Spring Charity KAL and CAL for Warm Up America!

Got some acrylic yarn lying around you don't know what to do with? Between projects and want to stay productive? Be sure to take a look at the Ravelry thread for the Knitter's Pride Spring Charity KAL/CAL. All the details and the form to submit with your knitted or crocheted squares are available there. It launched on May 1 and runs until May 31! There's a chance to win a set of needles or hooks from Knitter's Pride, so get crackin'!

Connecticut Sheep, Wool, and Fiber Festival

Anne made it to the Connecticut Sheep, Wool, and Fiber Festival in April with her family. It was a nice blend of demonstrations, animals, and shopping. She was able to pick up some goodies from Yankee Knitter Designs, Katrinkles, 7th Floor Yarn, Once Upon a Corgi, and others. Listen to the podcast for the details on her haul.

Giveaway

Anne picked up a selection of items at the festival to gift to a lucky listener. To enter, follow her on Instagram and join the Ravelry group (one entry for each). Also, find the episode thread on the Ravelry group and share a family-friendly story from your own teen years that makes you laugh now. The storytellers among you will get 5 entries for sharing!

The episode 7 giveaway is a selection of items bought at the Connecticut Sheep, Wool, and Fiber Festival, as well as a set of stitch markers from Anne's remaining inventory.

Upcoming Events

Anne should be attending the Massachusetts Sheep and Woolcraft event on May 25th at the Cummington Fairgrounds. If you would like to say hi, send her a message with an idea of where and when to meet up. (Anne suggests noon at the ring where the sheep sheering will be taking place, but she's never been, so that may not be the best idea!

In July, she hopes to spend a few days completing the I-91 Yarn Shop Hop. Eleven shops in 4 days? Sounds like a dream! Be sure to check out this blog entry from Webs, one of the participating shops, for all the details!

Featured Music

The first song featured was "Teenager," by The Crypts and is available at the Free Music Archive.

The second song was "Oh, Mother, I'm Wild," by Howard Johndon, Harry Pease, and Eddie Nelson, available from the Free Music Archive.

If you are a musician who would like a song featured on the program, or if you have comments or feedback, please contact the show at [email protected]

Social Media

You can follow Anne on Instagram or Ravelry as @ithoughtiknewhow. She posts articles related to knitting and yarn on the Facebook Group and on Twitter as @ThoughtIKhewHow. Subscribe to the podcast through iTunes or the podcast app of your choice.

There is now a Ravelry Group for the show. Be sure to join and introduce yourself!

2019-05-07
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Episode 006: I Went to London and All I Got Was This Yarn

006: I Went to London and All I Got Was This Yarn

Released April 23, 2019

In this episode, Anne announces the winner of the last giveaway, talks about her trip to London, and announces another giveaway!

Winner!

Congratulations to Euphistic81 on Instagram, who won the giveaway announced in episode 5 from Dragonfly Fibers and Knitter's Pride!

London!

Anne and her daughter visited two fashion-related sites in London, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Fashion and Textile Museum, as well as the Fashion Museum in Bath. The V&A was hosting special exhibits about Dior and Mary Quant, but also has a permanent exhibit that includes knitwear. The Fashion and Textile Museum rotates it's exhibits frequently. Even if they aren't showing knitwear at the time, this small museum is very informative! The Fashion Museum in Bath walks you through centuries of fashion through 100 representative outfits, as well as hosting an additional exhibit that changes from time to time.

The Mary Quant exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Museum featured a hand-knit dress surrounded by several of the knitting and sewing patterns Quant created so people could make their own versions of her designs. Some of her knitting patterns are available as PDFs from sellers on Etsy.

Three Yarn Shops to Visit

The Village Haberdashery is located in the West Hampstead area of London, just a short walk from the nearest Underground station. It focuses mainly on yarn and fabric crafts, but is a great little all-around craft store.

Liberty London is well known for their Liberty fabrics, but it's also the flagship store for Rowan yarns. For many of us, this is a rare opportunity to take a gander at Rowan's entire line!

My sweater's worth of Erila Knight's British Blue 100 from Wool in Bath, UK. Also, the project bag gifted to Anne by Wool's owner, Laura, as a thank you for contributing hats for The Big Knit 2019.

Wool is a cozy, welcoming yarn shop just a short walk from the Bath Spa train station in Bath, England. They have an extensive collection of British yarns, a welcoming staff, and a gentle shop dog names Toby. Be sure to stop by on your way to or from the Roman Baths to give Toby a pat and take the time to peruse their extensive pattern offerings!

Upcoming Events

April 27, 2019 is Local Yarn Store Day. Be sure to check the listings to see if your LYS is participating. Whether they are officially involved of now, consider swinging by to show some support for your local brick-and-mortar stores that day!

For those in New England, April 27 is also the day of the Connecticut Sheep, Wool, and Fiber Festival. Anne will be there with her family. Will you? Say hi if you see her there!

Giveaway

Be sure to listen to the episode to learn how to enter our newest episode for a Japanese Knot bag from LittleComfortsAtoZ and a hank of handspun alpaca from Peru.

The episode 6 giveaway is a project bag from LittleComfortsAtoZ (Look for her on Etsy), a hank of handspun alpaca yarn, and a set of stitch markers!

Featured Music

The first song featured was "The Can't Find Kelly" sung by Billy Merson and is available at the Free Music Archive.

The second song was "Ca Bages Ca Beans and Car Rots," sung by Florrie Ford, also available from the Free Music Archive.

If you are a musician who would like a song featured on the program, or if you have comments or feedback, please contact the show at [email protected]

Support the Show

You can help support this show by buying your laundry detergent through Dropps, like I do! It comes to my door every quarter without my having to worry about it. The pods use no plastic--not even in their packaging--and they work. And at half the price I had been paying for pods, the switch was a no-brainer for me. Give them a try and a portion of the price will support the podcast at no additional cost to you!

Social Media

You can follow Anne on Instagram or Ravelry as @ithoughtiknewhow. She posts articles related to knitting and yarn on the Facebook Group and on Twitter as @ThoughtIKhewHow. Subscribe to the podcast through iTunes or the podcast app of your choice.

There is now a Ravelry Group for the show. Be sure to join and introduce yourself!

2019-04-23
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Episode 005: Tension

005: Tension

Released March 26, 2019

In this episode, Anne talks about her tension issues with the third swatch of the Master Hand Knitter Program, plus a correction, music to knit by, projects she's been working on, a charity knitting opportunity, and the first giveaway of the podcast!

A Correction

In the last episode, Anne planned to knit the ribbing for swatch 2 of the Master Hand Knitting Program in smaller needles, but a listener pointed out that the instructions spell out that you should use the same needles. So, thank you to Julie for saving Anne from having to reknit the swatch!

Progress on Swatch 3

Swatch three is a seed-stitch swatch, but without proper, consistent tension, gaps appear at the transition from purl to knit. After many attempts resulting in slow improvement, Anne has decided to stop knitting the swatch and, instead, will be knitting a seed stitch scarf, which should give her plenty of practice without ruining the yarn she needs for her MHK swatches!

On and Off the Needles

Anne has a lot on the needles right now, including her second attempt at Sencilla, by Shireen Nadir; Nejiri, by Yumiko Sakurai; and the Bonte Mitts, by Joyce Riemens. Listen to the episode to hear how they are progressing!

The only project Anne finished since the last podcast was a modified version of the Juniper Cowl, available on the Berroco Website. For information on how she altered the pattern from a standard cowl to one that warms her shoulders as well, you'll have to listen to the podcast!

The Big Knit UK

While there's been little progress on "real" projects, Anne has been busy participating in The Big Knit by knitting 5 mini hats a day from March 15 to April 6. (So far, so good, as of the day this episode launches!)

These tiny hats are a great way to turn scrap yarn into funding for Age UK.

American knitters: if you would like to contribute to the cause, Anne is leaving April 2, 2019 for the UK and is happy to take your hats along, but you have to act fast to get the hats to herby April 1!! Send her an email at anne @ familypodcasts . com to get the mailing address when you're ready. Any American knitters who mails her 10 hats by April 1 will be thanked with a set of stitchmarkers from the inventory that remains from her former business. (While supplies last.)

Knitters in the UK have until July to submit their mini hats through their local Age UK. Additionally, many knitting stores are acting as collection points. Anne will be taking her hats, and any she receives from listeners, to donate at Wool in Bath.

Product Review: Ginger DPNs and Crochet Hooks

A few days ago, Anne wrote a blog post singing the praises of Knitter's Pride Ginger line of needles and hooks. Check it out.

Giveaway!!

Our first giveaway is underway! The deadline to enter is April 18, and you must listen to this episode of the podcast to find out how to enter.

This hank of Selkie Sport from Dragonfly Fibers and two sets of DPNs from Knitter's Pride could be yours if you win!

The giveaway is a hank of Selkie Sport from Dragonfly Fibers and two sets of DPNs from Knitter's Pride. The Selkie Sport is 70% blue faced Leicester wool and 30% silk in the Denali colorway. It's a joy to work with and the range of blues is utterly blissful. This giaveaway is open to anyone who lives anywhere the USPS delivers, including international listeners. If I can get it to you by going to my post office, you can enter to win!

The next episode should release on April 23, and I'll pick the winner as I record, so look for episode 6 to hear if you've won!

Featured Music

The first song featured was "Ma Jeewanaye" by H. R. Jothipala and is available at the Free Music Archive.

The second song was West in Africa by a South African man named John Bartmann, also available from the Free Music Archive.

If you are a musician who would like a song featured on the program, or if you have comments or feedback, please contact the show at [email protected]

Support the Show

You can help support this show by buying your laundry and dishwashing detergents through Dropps, like I do! It comes to my door every quarter without my having to worry about it. The pods use no plastic--not even in their packaging--and they work. And at half the price I had been paying for pods, the switch was a no-brainer for me. Give them a try and a portion of the price will support the podcast at no additional cost to you!



Social Media

You can follow Anne on Instagram or Ravelry as @ithoughtiknewhow. She posts articles related to knitting and yarn on the Facebook Group and on Twitter as @ThoughtIKhewHow. Subscribe to the podcast through iTunes or the podcast app of your choice.

There is now a Ravelry Group for the show. Be sure to join and introduce yourself!

2019-03-25
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Episode 004: Slow Down, Buckaroo

004: Slow Down, Buckaroo

Released: March 12, 2019

In this episode, Anne shares what she learned while knitting the first and second swatches of the Master Hand Knitting Program.

Thank You for your Pattern Help

Anne asked, and listeners responded. A couple of great recommendations came in for Anne's request for a good beginner's sock pattern. Michelle recommended Anne try the Hermione's Everyday Socks pattern, available for free on Ravelry. Nancye from Dragonfly Fibers suggested she pick up a copy of Knitting Rules by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee. It hadn't arrived by the time this episode was recorded, but Anne has it now. It has both a "recipe" for socks and an actual pattern, so Anne will be drawing from that as well! Thank you!

Knitting Techniques

The first two swatches involve knitting K2, P2 and K1, P1 ribbing. In the podcast, Anne discusses three techniques that helped her neaten up ribbing. Listen to the episode to learn more about why ribbing can be tricky and how these techniques might help you.

Asking the Questions

Anne was a little too hasty in knitting the first few swatches for the program and learned her lesson about taking the time to exhibit some humility and accept she does not, in fact, know everything.

Honey

This week's affiliate is Honey, an app for your desktop that tracks price changes on Amazon, applies coupon codes for the best deals when you shop online, and earns points to apply toward gift cards when you shop at major retailers. Anne has used it for over a year now and Honey has found many ways to save. Join through this link, and Anne will receive a modest finder's fee to apply toward the cost of running the show.

Product Review

Nostepinnes are specially formed dowels used to wind yarn into center-pull balls for knitters.

Knitter's Pride was very kind to send Anne a selection of products to test in exchange for her honest review. The first product she got to play with was a nostepinne. As promised in the episode, here's the YouTube video that she found the most helpful when she was learning:

https://youtu.be/toNeWx0FOjA

Anne found the nostepinne to be a helpful addition to her knitting tool kit. It saves the hassle of setting up a ball winder and swift for smaller winding jobs. It's also lightweight and wooden, which makes it a handy tool for those who knit while traveling. For people who are new to knitting, it's an economical option compared to buying a ball winder and swift combo. If you end up sticking with the hobby, those can come later, and the nostepinne can become something you use for the joy of it.

The Knitter's Pride nostepinnes are available at many local yarn stores, or you can find them on Amazon, available in two varieties.

Help for England!

Bath, England: A knitter's paradise?

Anne and her aspiring-fashion-designer daughter will be traveling to London at the beginning of April. Anne, the knitter, and Abby, the seamstress, are trying to pack their itinerary with appropriately-themed destinations. Aside from the typical tourist destinations, they will be visiting the Victoria and Albert, Fashion and Textile Museum, Camden Market, and the Village Haberdashery while they are in London, and Wool, Country Threads, and the Fashion Museum while they are in Bath. If you have any other recommendations for them within a 2-hour train ride of Paddington Station, please get in touch!

Featured Music

The first song featured was "Solo Acoustic Guitar" by Jason Shaw and available at the Free Music Archive.

The second song was "Ready to Go" by Arthur Nicholson, a folk singer from Shetland. Arthur's work is insightful and mellow. You'll find yourself singing his choruses to yourself through the day. Find his work on Soundcloud or YouTube, or visit his website to buy a CD for yourself.

If you are a musician who would like a song featured on the program, or if you have comments or feedback, please contact the show at [email protected]

Social Media

You can follow Anne on Instagram or Ravelry as @ithoughtiknewhow. She posts articles related to knitting and yarn on the Facebook Group and on Twitter as @ThoughtIKhewHow. Subscribe to the podcast through iTunes or the podcast app of your choice.

2019-03-12
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Bonus Episode: Tips for Visiting Shetland

003B: Tips for Visiting Shetland

Released: March 1, 2019

You should visit Shetland.

I just want to make that point clear, right off the bat. I love to travel and I've been blessed to be able to travel far more than my original life circumstances led me to believe I'd be able to. On my travels, I have learned that it is a gift to be able to slip on some different cultural lenses for a time. (The greatest blessing might be that I continue to find that the bedrock we share is the same.) While I've enjoyed the all of my trips, there have been only three places where I felt like I'd like to linger in those lenses for a few years and see if I could incorporate aspects of the culture into my own character. One place I ended up lingering long enough to mostly raise my children. The other I'll maybe talk about another time. The third is Shetland.

If it's not already on your bucket list of places to go, add it. And place it higher on the list than you think you should. And I'm not just speaking to knitters here. Nonknitters--spend at least a couple of weeks. Knitters, you'll want a month. Or longer. That's pretty pie-in-the-sky planning for most of us, I know. Aim for at least a week!

No, I'm not kidding. Yes, I know the islands that comprise Shetland are much smaller than, say, Japan, which your cousin visited and felt he saw everything there was to see in 10 days. First of all, I'd call anyone who said that about Japan a liar or ignorant. Second, get out of that tourist, check-the-boxes mindset. There are things you will want to do and see on Shetland. Plenty. But it is also an ideal place to just go and be.

Getting There

There are three ways people tend to get to Shetland. One is by cruise ship. I assume those folks are there as part of a cruise around ports in the North Sea. If that's how you're getting to Shetland, you'll only really have time to get into Lerwick. You're going to want to stay longer. I promise.

The next option is by plane. LoganAir is the only airline that services Shetland. You can fly from multiple cities in Scotland year-round, and seasonally from Manchester, England, and Bergen, Norway. This is, in theory, the quickest way to get to Shetland; however, weather often causes delays, so pack some snacks and something to keep your mind occupied.

Both of my flights were delayed by several hours, but the LoganAir staff kept us all well apprised of what was going on. All of it was beyond their control, and passengers just rolled with it. While chatting with an attendant on the way up, I was told if the flight becomes truly impossible due to weather concerns, they put passengers on the ferry. A fellow passenger shared that when they travel to and from the mainland, they always leave a day before they need to be somewhere, to allow time for potential delays.

The third way to get to Shetland is by ferry through NorthLink Ferries. They depart in the afternoon from Aberdeen and arrive in the morning in Lerwick. They offer different levels of accommodation at different price points. You can rent private rooms with beds, a bed in a shared room (you'll be grouped by gender), sleeping pods (akin to some business class seats on planes) and basic reclining seats. There are showers on board, so you can arrive fresh and ready to go in the morning. Be aware, though, that the passage can be rough. However, delays are much less likely with the ferry than with air travel.

Getting Around

I strongly recommend that you rent a car. Yes, there is public transport. Yes, you may have to drive on the left instead of the right. But, the truth is that unless you are planning on staying in town all day, you will want the flexibility that having a car provides, especially if you are there for a limited amount of time.

My chariot during my stay.

Star Rent-a-Car, Ltd. is the company I rented from because they have an office at the airport and in Lerwick, so I knew I could get the care right away and if anything happened, they had an outlet close to my flat. They are a popular choice. You'll see their sherbert-colored Fiat 500s all over the islands. They rent subcompacts through 7-seaters, including prestige vehicles. The one thing they didn't seem to have was automatic transmission vehicles. So, before you head to the islands, find yourself a standard and practice. Also, have the person at the rental desk come out and show you any quirks of the vehicle. For instance, there was a trick to removing the gas cap on my car that I didn't discover until it was time to remove the gas cap three days later.

If you don't drive or really don't want to drive on Shetland, there are buses. Plan your activities around the bus schedule, take a book with you, and you should be fine.

Many of the roads on Shetland are single-lane roads. All along these roads there are wider areas where you can pull to the side and allow on-coming traffic to pass. Sometimes both sides of the road widen, sometimes it's one of the other. If both sides widen, whoever gets to the pull-off first should pull to the side. If the road widens to the left, you should pull over, if it widens to your right, on-coming traffic should pull over. Regardless of who moves out of the way, you should give a little wave as you pass. It's only polite.

Staying There

I'm going to be frank here. When I was looking into booking my trip, very few of the available hotels in the Lerwick area looked appealing to me. The ones that did were already booked up. I did not actually see the rooms in these less-than-appealing hotels, but the photos on their websites made them look very dated and run down. If this is not the actual situation, I would suggest to these hoteliers that they invest in some new photos.

I ended up turning to Airbnb and found an apartment a short walk away from the Commerce Street area of Lerwick that had everything I needed and was a perfect jumping-off point for all my adventures in Shetland. There are many people offering apartments or homes on Airbnb, and even more offering single rooms in their house.

Be aware that during festivals and events on Shetland, all forms of accommodation are in high demand. As of writing this, there are only a handful of hotel rooms and Airbnb "entire place" listings available for Wool Week 2019--a event taking place seven months from now. So if you plan to visit during one of their peak events, book as soon as you can.

Things to Do and See

There is far more to do and see on Shetland than the small landmass suggests. Shetlanders create their own fun and are very proud of their history and heritage. There are festivals galore and museums a-plenty. There are artists with open studios, opportunities to observe birds and animals in their native habitats, and no lack of space for rambling.

Overlooking the Jarlshof, an area that was continuously occupied and built over by humans for thousands of years.

Promote Shetland is the best place to start planning your trip. From there, hop over to TripAdvisor to learn the specifics of various attractions. Below is a list of all the places I visited on my 4-day trip. This should give you a sense of just how much you can fit in if you do need to keep your trip short. If I'd stayed longer, I would have added visits to Unst and Yell, a nature cruise, a dance in a community center, and a knitting circle. Plus, I would have wandered about more in nature. And, had I been able to be more flexible with my dates, I would have timed my visit to line up with one of the many festivals. Bottom line: I really do regret only having had four days to visit.

The ruined church on St. Ninian's Isle. A cache of treasure was found here in the 1950s by a school boy. Reproductions are in the Shetland Museum and Archives. The originals are in Edinburgh.

Anne's 4-Day Trip (Your results may vary)

The smaller sites can be visited in 30-60 minutes. Larger museums and sites take 1-2 hours. Rather than listing the sites in the order I saw them (because I don't completely remember!), I am listing from the south toward the north:
Sumburgh Head Lighthouse
Jarlshof Prehistoric and Norse Settlement
Old Scatness
Croft House Museum
St. Ninian's Isle
Broch of Mousa
Hoswick Visitor's Center
Scalloway Castle
Scalloway Museum
Clickimin Broch
Lerwick
Shetland Museum and Archives
Bressay
Shetland Textile Museum
Bonhoga Gallery
Tangwick Haa Museum

The Broch of Mousa. The little pointy bit at the top is a person for scale.

Shopping

Every museum and visitor's center I got to visit had a gift shop. You will have plenty of opportunities to buy souvenirs!

Generally speaking, the best concentration and variety of shops that I encountered was along Commercial Street in Lerwick, which got a mention in The Guardian's list of 10 cool shopping districts around the world. There was a nice blend of tourist-oriented and "real life needs" shops to be found there. Another spot in Lerwick for gifts and daily-need items is the Toll Clock Shopping Center on the north side of town. Near the Toll Clock is the Co-op grocery store, in case you are staying in a flat and need some ingredients for meals, and a Tesco is available on the south side of town. There are also specialty food shops scattered through town and drug stores can be found on Commercial Street and on the corner of Commercial Road and Burgh Rd.

Jamieson's of Shetland and Jamieson and Smith were the two yarn stores I was able to visit, but there are other places for yarn and finished sweaters as well, such as Anderson and Co. and Loose Ends. Some other shops that tickled my fancy in the Commercial Street area were Love from Shetland, The Peerie Shop, Peerie Isles, and Ninian. Remember to be sure about hours and opening days before you head into town to lighten your wallet.

Additionally, there is a Craft Trail you can follow to visit artisans at work and buy directly from them!.

Places to Eat

This list is incredibly incomplete. I ate in Shetland with a special diet, so I was actually pretty excited to find so many options to meet my needs. But, that said, there were tons of restaurants on Shetland at various price points and convenience levels, so this list of places where I took my meals is far from exhaustive.

Scalloway Hotel
Da Steak Hoos
Sumburgh Hotel
Saffron Restaurant and Bar

Prep Work

There are a few things I'd recommend to prepare yourself before your trip.

First, watch Shetland or read the book series the show is based on by Anne Cleves. Yes, it will have you convinced that this island network of 23,000 people has a serious murder problem. Just remind yourself that it is a work of fiction. The stories are gripping to watch/read, and the show will acquaint you with the scenery, culture, and look of Lerwick. (At times, the first series feels like a travel advert, but that's ok! It was all helpful information!)

Fans of the series Shetland will recognize this as Jimmy Perez's home. You can see it along the waterfront in Lerwick.

Second, there are some common themes that arise in the various museums around the island. The first is the island's knitting history. Even if you aren't a knitter, a working knowledge of the history of Shetland knitting will help you appreciate what you see when you're there. The first parts of Alice Starmore's Book of Fair Isle Knitting and Magical Shetland Lace Shawls to Knit provide a good overview. The latter parts of the books cater more to the interests of knitters, but will also help non-knitters train their eyes for what they will see when they are there.

Several of the museums have community scarves for visitors to contribute to. I did my bit (between the needles) on this scarf at the Scalloway Museum.

The second common theme of the museums is Shetland's involvement in World War II, specifically the Shetland Bus, which was a group of people running secret missions between Shetland and Norway using fishing boats. A little background knowledge will help you better appreciate what the remaining artifacts represent.

Final Thoughts

I went to Shetland with my checklist of activities and a sense of adventure and left feeling like I was leaving home. The checklist was helpful, but after a day or two, I found myself mentally calculating the price of moving to this gem on the edge of the North Sea. The people are kind and welcoming. The food was delicious. The landscape was full of surprises. Shetland climbed into a corner of my heart and it has stayed there. I look forward to visiting again in 2019. Maybe I'll see you there!

For additional information about knitting-related sites and shopping on Shetland, listen to Episode 003: Shetland.

You can follow Anne on Instagram or Ravelry as @ithoughtiknewhow. She posts articles related to knitting and yarn on the Facebook Group and Twitter as @ThoughtIKhewHow. Subscribe to the podcast through iTunes or the podcast app of your choice.

2019-03-01
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Episode 003: Shetland

003: Shetland

Released: February 26, 2019

In this episode, Anne shares her trip to Shetland in July 2018.

History

The early days of knitting on Shetland have hazy beginnings. "Gunnister Man" died around 1700. He and his clothing were preserved by the peat he was buried in, including the earliest examples of knitted clothing found on the islands. A recreation of his knitted clothing and purse can be seen at the Tangwick Haa Museum.

Shetlanders were trading stockings to Dutch fisherman hundreds of years ago. Over time, the industrial revolution decreased demand for stockings and the knitting industry shifted to fine, open-work shawls in the mid-1800s. A photo of Edward, Prince of Wales, in a Fair-Isle sweater in 1921 popularized the style beyond the shores of Shetland, and it has continued to be a part of popular fashion to one degree or other since then. Excellent examples of both styles of knitting are available for view at the Shetland Museum and Archives and the Shetland Textile Museum.

A few of the Fair-Isle pieces on display at the Shetland Textile Museum.

The Crofthouse Museum is a great place to get a sense of the conditions that many of the island knitters. For many years, these women were subject to the truck system in which they were paid for their goods with merchandise, typically tea.

Local Tools

Shetland Knitters came up with many creative ways to do their work. To simplify blocking, they came up with a system of stretching frames for shawls and jumper boards for sweaters. Both allowed the women to move the knitting out of the way while it was drying in the proper shape.

Examples of Jumper Boards used to block Fair-Isle sweaters outside of the Shetland Textile Museum in Lerwick. This style of board would typically have been hung, here they are propped up against the wall with the help of some rocks.

A second ingenious invention was the knitting belt. This simple leather needle holder allowed knitters to keep control of their knitting while having to multitask. It also took the pressure off the right hand while they knit. Keep your eyes peeled at fiber festivals for a chance to give one a test drive.

Shetland MRI Scanner Appeal

Rather than having a sponsor on this episode, Anne would like to call your attention to the Shetland MRI Scanner Appeal. From their website:

"Over 600 patients from Shetland must travel south to have an MRI scan each year. MRI diagnostics are used to diagnose and monitor a wide variety of conditions and the number of patients who need them is steadily increasing. 

There can be delays in getting an MRI scan due to bad weather, transport delays and logistical problems in getting short notice appointments or one-stop clinics. There is also the challenge of making the journey itself, which can involve time off work, and impact on family life and child care at an already difficult time. "

https://shetlandmriscannerappeal.com/

There are many ways that you can contribute to the cause. Please visit their website and click on the yellow donate button at the top of the page to see their Fundraising Pack. It shows the many ways donations can be made, some at no direct cost to you. Planning to buy something from Amazon or eBay this week? Use their EasyFundraising link and the retailer will make a donation at no additional cost to you! There is information on ways to donate directly, host a fundraiser in person or online, and more! You can also follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to stay aware of fundraising events as they arise. Get in touch--they would love to hear from you!

Personal Essay

The view through the window of an abandoned crofthouse on Bressay.

Anne shares the lesson she learned while on Shetland about the consoling power of history and place.

Yarn Shops

Yarn is not hard to find on Shetland. Most gift shops carry either knitted items or yarn or both. But there are two yarn producers on Shetland who have stores in Lerwick that you won't want to miss.

Jamieson and Smith is a bit of a walk from the High Street area, but it's an easy walk and they have large amounts of everything in stock. Plus, they take in fleeces from crofters right next door and you can take a peak to get a sense of just how much work goes from getting the "before" to the "after."

Jamieson's of Shetland has a storefront on the High Street, with all their yarns, plus woven cloth. Those who sew as well as doing yarn crafts shouldn't miss it!

Both shops carry patterns, notions, hand-knit sweaters and more. If time permits, visit both. They each have their own special look and feel. Listen to the podcast for a more thorough description of each shop.

Recommended Books

If this episode piqued your interest in the history of Shetland knitting, some good follow-up books were mentioned in the episode. They are listed here, along with a few others:

Alice Starmore's Fair Isle Knitting - This book has a general, but thorough, overview of Shetland's knitting history. The rest of the book is patterns for several different sweaters, as well as designs for motifs and instructions to design your own fair-isle sweater.
Magical Shetland Lace Shawls to Knit - This book opens with a brief history of Shetland openwork knitting, and is then followed by a series of shawls inspired by or mimicking traditional Shetland shawls. There are projects at various knitting levels. It's a good choice if you want a collection of patterns you can "grow into" as your experience level increases.
The Magic of Shetland Lace Knitting - This book by Elizabeth Lovick, the same author of Magical Shetland Lace Shawls to Knit, is a collection of the motifs common to Shetland openwork. It's a must-have for designers! At the end of the book, Lovick applies the motifs to a series of modern projects. They would make great gifts for someone deserving of the effort!
Knitting by the Fireside and on the Hillside - If you wish to delve more deeply into the history of knitting on Shetland, this is the book. Linda G. Fryer takes readers into the society of the knitters and merchants involved with the hand knitting industry. You'll get to know some of the knitters and merchants by name. A more scholarly work, but still an enjoyable read.

Featured Music

The first song featured was by Fjanna, a group of teen musicians on Shetland who are keeping traditional music alive. They have great energy and sound! Put them on when you're tidying up or out on a run, and they'll keep you moving! Follow them on Facebook and YouTube to hear more of their music.

The second song was "Between the Eyes" by Arthur Nicholson, a folk singer from Shetland. Arthur's work is insightful and mellow. You'll find yourself singing his choruses to yourself through the day. Find his work on Soundcloud or YouTube, or visit his website to buy a CD for yourself.

If you are a musician who would like a song featured on the program, or if you have comments or feedback, please contact the show at [email protected]

Social Media

You can follow Anne on Instagram or Ravelry as @ithoughtiknewhow. She posts articles related to knitting and yarn on the Facebook Group and on Twitter as @ThoughtIKhewHow. Subscribe to the podcast through iTunes or the podcast app of your choice.

2019-02-26
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Episode 002: Hand Knitting is Not Machine Knitting

002: Hand Knitting is Not Machine Knitting

Released: February 12, 2019

In this episode, Anne talks in greater detail about the preliminary swatch she talked about in the last episode. Specifically, she talks about how the imperfections nearly halted her progress for good, until some wise words silenced the negative voice in her head.

It may seem like a minor thing, but we often get caught up on the imperfections in the "minor things" and keep ourselves from doing bigger things as a result. We are not machines, and shouldn't hold ourselves to a standard of constant perfection. It's ok to make mistakes, as long as we learn along the way and we fix the things we can.

Anne moves on to discuss a series of items she finished in the last two weeks. Visit her Ravelry account for photos and information about the Loving Embrace shawl, cacti, Grosgrain Hat, and Girlfriends cowls.

Anne has been knitting for over 20 years and has never knit socks. She needs to start learning the ins and outs of the process before she moves on to level 2 of the Master Hand Knitter Program. If you have a favorite sock pattern you can recommend, send her an email at anne @ familypodcasts . com.

Book Review

Anne gives a brief review of The Knitter's Book of Wool: The Ultimate Guide to Understanding, Using, and Loving this Most Fabulous Fiber, by Clara Parkes. It is a fascinating read about the structure of wool fibers and yarns, the benefits of blending certain fibers with wool, and general information on the cleaning and care of wool. Where this book really shines, though, is the breed-by-breed comparison of the types of wool available to knitters and spinners. The information is presented in a non-technical format that is approachable to anyone. Anne loved it so much that after borrowing a copy, she bought a copy for herself to keep on hand.

Featured Music

The first song featured was "Yippee!" by Loyalty Freak Music is available on the Free Music Archive.

The second song was "Fireworks" by Jahzarr is available on the Free Music Archive.

If you are a musician who would like a song featured on the program, or if you have comments or feedback, please contact the show at [email protected]

Support the Show

You can support the show this week by trying ButcherBox. ButcherBox is a service that delivers grass-fed beef, heritage breed pork and organic chicken right to your door. They are a favorite in the I Thought I Knew How household. When you order using the link above, you'll receive a discount and a few bonus cuts of meat, and, at no additional cost to you, ButcherBox will provide a benefit to the podcast that will offset the costs of operation.

Social Media

You can follow Anne on Instagram or Ravelry as @ithoughtiknewhow.

2019-02-12
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Episode 001: Introduction

001: Introduction

Released: January 28, 2019

In this episode, Anne takes some time to introduce herself. She learned to crochet as a child and to knit several years later. On January 1, she took the plunge and signed up for the Master Hand Knitter Program offered by the Knitting Guild Association.

The first song in the show is "Dead From the Beginning, Alive Till the End," by Doctor Turtle and available at the Free Music Archive.

After the music break, Anne shares her first memories of yarn shopping with her mother, as well as some thoughts on her current local yarn store, Marji's Yarncrafts in Granby, Connecticut. Marji's is a delightful yarn shop full of the tried and true as well as items to add extra style to your projects, all in a cozy setting that will have you wishing you had the time to sit and knit for a while. The last time Anne was in Marji's, she picked up a Mybaggee mini zippered mesh pouch set that has done a perfect job at keeping her notions contained and orderly.

The second song in the show is "MainSquare," by Jahzzar and available at the Free Music Archive.

Next, Anne talks about blocking the preliminary swatch for the Master Knitter program. It was a little tricky and required two different blocking methods to get it to lie straight. A traditional wet block stopped the sides from curling in, but the tops required the "mega-steam" method as described by Deborah Newton in her book, Finishing School: A Master Class for Knitters. It's a great way to get stubborn, natural-fiber knitting to lie flat without mashing your stitches. Listen to the episode for details!

A great way to support the show and save money is to order your household detergent from Dropps. They will ship laundry or dishwasher detergent straight to your door, as well as fabric softener, scent boosters, oxi boosters, and more. Their eco-friendly packaging is recyclable cardboard and their formula is free from dyes and excess water. One Dropps laundry pod does the job of two pods from a certain national leading brand, and the price per pod is roughly half the price of most of the popular brands sold in the supermarket. They have plans for singles, couples, and families that ship to your door every four months. With Dropps, you no longer have to worry about running out of detergent and you'll likely end up paying much less than you were. Use our link and save $10 off your first order while helping to support to show!

Anne rounds out the show by talking about what's on her needles at the moment: the Drops Loving Embrace pattern worked in Madeline Tosh Merino Light. Then, she finishes with two podcast recommendations: Cast On and Mastering the Knits. If I Thought I Knew How didn't satisfy your knitting podcast needs, give them a listen!

If you are a musician who would like a song featured on the program, or if you have comments or feedback, please contact the show at [email protected]

You can follow Anne on Instagram or Ravelry as @ithoughtiknewhow.

2019-01-28
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En liten tjänst av I'm With Friends. Finns även på engelska.
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