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Economist Radio

Economist Radio

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist asks: Who will decide the fate of Hong Kong?

Former Chief Secretary of the territory, Anson Chan, has called on leader Carrie Lam to withdraw a controversial law which sparked a wave of protests. Anne McElvoy asks her whether Hong Kong?s special status is under threat and, 30 years after the Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing, if history might repeat itself? Anne also speaks with our Asia columnist, Dominic Ziegler, who has been reporting on the story since it began

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2019-08-16
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Yield signs: the global economy

Investors are piling into safe assets as markets whipsaw: what?s driving the global economy these days is anxiety. Is all the worry justified? Nestled among the conflicts and suffering in the Democratic Republic of Congo is a vast national park that is trying to make the most of its stunning natural beauty. And, why are some languages so damnably hard to learn? Additional audio by ?sctang? from Freesound.org.

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2019-08-16
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Editor?s picks: August 15th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, markets are braced for a global downturn. (10:00) Bernie Sanders could hand the Democratic ticket to a moderate. (18:02) And, investors are growing disenchanted with Narendra Modi

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2019-08-15
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Poll reposition: Macri fights back

President Mauricio Macri?s thumping presidential-primary loss in Argentina left the markets fearing a left-wing resurgence. To win over voters, he?s announced a relaxation of some austerity measures. Will it be enough? In the Arctic, wildfires are rampant?and they?ll amplify the very temperature rises that caused them. And, a look at the unlikely rise of Gulf-state book fairs.

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2019-08-15
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Babbage: A cure for Ebola?

Two treatments for Ebola have emerged from a clinical trial in Africa. Scientists estimate that sea-levels across the globe will rise by 50cm or so in the next 80 years; in some places they could go up by twice as much. Are governments and businesses prepared to deal with the rising tides? And, as face-recognition technology spreads, so do ideas for subverting it. Kenneth Cukier hosts

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2019-08-14
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Let?s not make a deal: Brexit

Talk grows ever-louder of Britain exiting the European Union without a divorce agreement. Most parliamentarians would rather avoid that?but can they do anything to stop it? We join a Ukrainian military exercise as the country seeks to beef up defences that were nearly wiped out by Russia?s annexation of Crimea. And, China?s tech companies train their sights on the tech-savvy elderly. Additional audio: "English Dawn Chorus, Rural, late spring" by odilonmarcenaro at Freesound.org and ?Puzzle Pieces? by Lee Rosevere.

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2019-08-14
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The Secret History of the Future: Bug in the System

The first ever computer program was written in 1843 by Ada Lovelace, a mathematician who hoped her far-sighted treatise on mechanical computers would lead to a glittering scientific career. Today, as we worry that modern systems suffer from ?algorithmic bias? against some groups of people, what can her program tell us about how software, and the people who make it, can go wrong?

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2019-08-14
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Money talks: Delayed tariffication

President Trump has delayed some tariffs on Chinese imports. Soumaya Keynes, our US economics editor, explains the surprise decision and its implications for the global economy. Also, is data as valuable an asset as oil? What can companies learn from the oil industry about keeping data safe? And, the secrets of success for online fashion retailers. Rachana Shanbogue hosts

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2019-08-13
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Sex cells: the modern fertility business

Companies are rushing to fill new niches for would-be parents: in vitro fertilisation extras, swish egg-harvesting ?studios? and apps to track reproductive health. But some companies promise more than science can deliver. The worrying flare-up of piracy off west Africa presents new challenges and unmitigated risks to sailors. And, lessons learned from a shooting simulator for police.

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2019-08-13
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Raid in Aden: Yemen?s fragmented conflict

Over the weekend, armed rebels overran Aden, the seat of Yemen?s internationally recognised government. They had defected from a loose, Saudi-backed coalition that looks increasingly shaky. The gaming business is huge, but isn?t yet part of the streaming revolution seen in films and music; who will become the Netflix of gaming? And, an update to a 1970s book on sexuality reveals much about modern female desire, and how it?s perceived.

Additional music by Rymdkraft and Kuesa.

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2019-08-12
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The Economist asks: Is LA the model for a more diverse America?

Eric Garcetti, the mayor of Los Angeles, argues America?s second largest city benefits from being a melting pot. Anne McElvoy asks him how he is faring in tackling the city?s housing crisis and why he is not running for the Democratic nomination in 2020. They address allegations of racism in the White House and, in the wake of two mass shootings, how to curb gun violence in America. Also, could smooth jazz prevent traffic jams?

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2019-08-09
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Withdrawal symptoms: America-Taliban talks

America?s envoy claimed ?excellent progress? in negotiations ahead of the country?s planned exit from Afghanistan. But stickier talks await, between the Islamist militia and the Afghan government. A promising new vaccine may at last tackle typhoid fever, which claims 160,000 lives every year. And, we travel to Scotland and hop on the world?s shortest scheduled flight. 

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2019-08-09
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Editor?s picks: August 8th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, China?s response to the protests in Hong Kong could have global repercussions.  The British government claims it is too late for MPs to prevent the country leaving the EU on October 31st. Yet many are determined to try (9:12). And, Norway has had its fillet of fish-smugglers (16:33)

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2019-08-08
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Clear-cut risks: the Amazon degrades

Deforestation is on the rise and Brazil?s government is all but encouraging it. Beyond a certain threshold, the world?s largest rainforest will dry out into a savanna?with dire consequences. We ask why Malaysia?s reformist coalition isn?t doing much reforming of the country?s illiberal laws. And, Norway?s growing scourge of fish-smuggling.

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2019-08-08
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Babbage: Meno-Pause

Can pioneering surgery help delay the menopause and how will it impact women's lives? And, Clara Vu, of Veo Robotics, explains some of the challenges of designing ?cobots?, robots that work collaboratively with humans on manufacturing tasks. Also, should people have the right to choose to know if they are a carrier of a hereditary genetic disease? Alok Jha hosts

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2019-08-07
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State of alarm: India moves on Kashmir

Prime Minister Narendra Modi?s government has gutted the autonomy of the restive and disputed Jammu & Kashmir. India?s only majority-Muslim state is locked down and fearful of a vast demographic reshuffle. We meet the deep-sea divers of the oil industry, finding that their work is as dangerous as it is dependent on oil prices. And, what is a ?deepfake?, how are they made and what risks do they pose?

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2019-08-07
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The Secret History of the Future: Dots, Dashes and Dating Apps

In the 19th century, young people wooed each other over the telegraph. But meeting strangers on the wires could lead to confusion, disappointment, and even fraud. Do modern online dating apps have anything to learn from telegraph romances?

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2019-08-07
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Money talks: Yuan-a fight?

President Donald Trump has accused China of being a currency manipulator, after the Chinese currency ?po qi? or ?cracked 7? against the US dollar? a psychologically significant value?for the first time in over a decade. How will this escalation of the US-China trade war affect global markets? Also, how useful are yield curves for predicting future recessions? And, life without Uber. Rachana Shanbhogue presents.

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2019-08-06
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PLA a part? Hong Kong?s growing unrest

China?s central government held another press conference to address increasingly chaotic unrest in Hong Kong. A close listen reveals language that may be presaging a military intervention. There?s much to be said for employee share ownership?but a push from left-leaning politicians to mandate its availability is creating controversy. And, the dirty secret behind the exorbitant costs of music-gig tickets.

Additional audio courtesy of cgeffex from Freesound.org.

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2019-08-06
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Sticking to their guns: violence in America

Two mass shootings over the weekend add to the unrelenting stream of gun violence in America. We look at the political and social forces that ensure it will continue. The collapse of Venezuela?s infrastructure has left its people desperate for medical care. We meet some of the women crossing into Colombia to seek help. And, the politics behind the ever-shifting travel advice dispensed in the Middle East.

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2019-08-05
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The Economist asks: Should race matter on stage?

Wendell Pierce, best known for his roles in the television dramas ?The Wire?, ?Suits? and ?Jack Ryan?, plays Willy Loman in a new production of ?Death of a Salesman?, moving to London?s West End in the autumn. Anne McElvoy caught up with him backstage in July and asked him about whether casting an all-black Loman family changes the nature of the play, his thoughts on America's troubled racial history, and how that history shapes his views of the current president of the United States

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2019-08-02
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A farewell to arms control: the INF treaty dies

As America abandons the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces treaty we examine the future of arms control. New weapons abound and new countries are using them, but new treaties will be hard to come by. With Baltimore in the news as President Donald Trump?s latest point of provocation, we ask how the city?s crime rates got so high, and what can be done. And, the surprising rise of rosé wine in France.

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2019-08-02
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Editor?s picks: August 1st 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the collapse of the Amazon, which is home to 40% of Earth?s rainforest, would be felt far beyond Brazil?s borders. America?s central bank has cut rates for the first time in more than a decade (9:40). And, meal delivery is anything but a tasty business (15:20)

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2019-08-01
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Disbelief, dysfunction, disaster: Congo?s Ebola outbreak

As aid workers battle the second-worst outbreak in history, they face violence and disbelief. A history of conflict, suspicion of the rich world and wild conspiracy theories make fighting a difficult battle far harder. Architects are tackling the dark, loud, violent nature of jails to make them more about rehabilitation than retribution. And, the increasingly absurd language of job adverts.

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2019-08-01
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Babbage: Hot as hell

Record-breaking heatwaves are becoming routine and they are killing people. But many of the potentially life-saving solutions are both low-tech and low-cost. Governments should be doing more. Also, we visit Lake Chad in the Sahel to understand how climate change can fuel conflict. And, droughts or floods, heatwaves or cold snaps, just how responsible is humanity for extreme weather events? Catherine Brahic hosts

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2019-07-31
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Apply liberally: Trudeau?s re-election bid

Canada?s prime minister may not have an easy campaign ahead; we sit down with Justin Trudeau to discuss his tenure so far. The country?s role as a liberal bastion seems safe, for now. Bayer is now reckoning with the problems presented by its latest acquisition, Monsanto?and it may emerge stronger. And, we meet a Mongolian band on a heavy-metal mission. Track ?Remember Your Thunder? courtesy of SnakeBiteSmile

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2019-07-31
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The Secret History of the Future: Mars on Earth

Polar exploration was the Victorian equivalent of the space race. Major powers vied to outdo each other, funding expeditions to the most inhospitable parts of the world as demonstrations of their supremacy over nature and each other. Today, the resulting tales of triumph and tragedy hold valuable lessons about what to do?and what not to do?as human explorers plan missions to Mars.

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2019-07-31
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Money talks: Warren of Wall Street

Can US Senator Elizabeth Warren convince Wall Street to back her and how are the other candidates faring in the Democratic competition for the 2020 presidential nomination? And, David Autor, an economist at MIT, speaks to Money Talks about how computers changed the US labour market, the impact of China and his gecko brand. Also, will the world follow Sweden?s lead and go cashless? Simon Long hosts

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2019-07-30
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Primary culler: Democrats? second debates

The fields of American presidential candidates just keep getting bigger, and party rules incentivise extreme views and dark-horse entrants. That might not be what?s best for either party. The fast-shipping arms race sparked by Amazon is radically reshaping how stuff gets around the world. And, on a visit to Shanghai?s flagship Lego store, we ask what makes the bricks so popular in China.

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2019-07-30
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The world ahead: Sunshady business

If efforts to cut emissions fall short, might some nations resort to solar geoengineering ? building a sunshade in the stratosphere ? to buy more time? Also, what if Facebook blocked Europeans from using its services? Tom Standage hosts

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2019-07-29
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One country, one system: Hong Kong?s protests

Authorities in Beijing held a rare press conference addressing unrest in Hong Kong. That gives lie to the region?s ?one country, two systems? governance; fears of a vicious crackdown are growing. Beneath what might seem to be advancements of women?s rights in Saudi Arabia is a mess of contradictions. And, why youngsters are turning away from Facebook?but toward the social-media giant?s other platforms.

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2019-07-29
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The Economist asks: How should filmmakers depict Nazi Germany?

Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck hoped never to make a film about the Third Reich. Anne McElvoy asks the Oscar-winning director of ?The Lives of Others? what changed his mind. His new film, ?Never Look Away?, was inspired by the life of the artist Gerhard Richter, who unwittingly married the daughter of an SS doctor responsible for the death of his aunt. Von Donnersmarck responds to criticisms of the film from Richter, and from those who say he stylises violence. And, how does his nation's relationship with the past shape European politics today?

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2019-07-26
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A plight in Tunisia: the president passes

Beji Caid Essebsi promised to fix the economy, re-establish security and consolidate Tunisia?s democracy?but all of that remains unresolved as the country begins its search for a new leader. Pet ownership is surging around the world, as are ways to pamper pets. Who owns whom here? And, homeopathy gets diluted as France removes its state subsidy for the pseudoscience.

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2019-07-26
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Editor?s picks: July 25th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, to stop a no-deal Brexit, moderate Tory MPs must be ready to bring down Boris Johnson. The growing friendship between Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping is much better for China than it is for Russia (8:50). And, the business of live music ? how big stars maximise their take from tours (16:30)

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2019-07-25
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Nothing new to report: Robert Mueller testifies

As promised, the special counsel revealed no more than appeared in his report into Russian election-meddling and obstruction of justice. The story hasn?t moved on, but Democrats would be wise to. Economists are returning to an old idea: that cultural forces should figure into their theories. And, a look at the blindingly fast hands?and feet, and robots?of Rubik?s Cube competitions.

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2019-07-25
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Babbage: Return of the king

Under Satya Nadella, Microsoft has reclaimed its crown as the world?s most valuable listed company. What can other firms learn from its reboot? Also, Reshma Shetty, cofounder of Gingko Bioworks, explains the potential of synthetic biology to harness ? and transform ? the power of nature. And, British ethicists put police use of artificial intelligence on trial. Alok Jha hosts

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2019-07-24
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Ricky situation: Puerto Rico?s protests

Rolling protests have rocked the island after leaked texts revealed the governor?s insults. But Puerto Rico?s problems are far greater than almost 900 pages of tasteless jokes. We consider the merits of challenging Latin America?s amnesties; justice might be served, but unearthing the past comes with its own perils. And, why women are so well represented among eastern Europe?s scientists.

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2019-07-24
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The Secret History of the Future: Meat and Potatoes

The potato seemed strange and unappetizing when it first arrived in Europe. But it grew into a wonder food that helped solve the continent?s hunger problems. Can its journey tell us what to expect from current efforts to replace animal meat with societally healthier meat alternatives made from plants, insects, or cells grown in petri dishes?

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2019-07-24
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Money talks: Europe?s bright spots

A few resilient countries and sectors have helped cushion the effects of a trade and manufacturing slowdown on the euro zone. But can that continue? Also, Tyler Cowen, an economist and blogger, stands up for big business. And, it?s all in the small print ? why it matters that consumers neither read nor understand the contracts they sign. Simon Long hosts

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2019-07-23
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You, May, be excused: Boris Johnson ascends

Britain has a new prime minister?who will inherit all the same problems his predecessor had. Good luck guiding a divided nation through Brexit with a paper-thin majority in parliament. Europe?s steel industry is getting hammered by tariffs and gluts, but one tucked-away mill in Austria has steeled itself for tumult. And, what single characteristic do Americans least want in their roommates?

Additional audio "Fly" by Benboncan at Freesound.org.

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2019-07-23
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Get one thing strait: Iran?s tanker stand-off

The seizure of a British-flagged tanker in the Gulf may seem counter to Iran?s international objectives. But at home, hardliners are in the ascendancy?for them, it?s a public-relations coup. The rise of populism, particularly in Europe, suggests voters are angry. But polls suggest otherwise; we dive into this ?happiness paradox?. And, the curious rise in borrowing against high-end art.

Additional music "Puzzle Pieces" by Lee Rosevere.

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2019-07-22
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The Economist asks: Anna Wintour

For more than 30 years as editor-in-chief of Vogue, Anna Wintour has been the gatekeeper of high style. Anne McElvoy asks if the fashion business can genuinely deliver sustainability and shift catwalk stereotypes. They discuss why Wintour personally avoids social media and the consequences of Donald Trump?s tweets about non-white congresswomen. Also, she addresses why Melania Trump has not been asked to appear on Vogue's cover since becoming first lady

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2019-07-19
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Servant?s entrance: Ukraine?s elections

Volodymyr Zelensky?s Servant of the People party looks set to make big gains in Ukraine?s parliament this weekend. It must, if it wants to weaken oligarchs? hold over the country. If space exploration and exploitation is to really take off, there?s one big thing missing: the laws to regulate it. And, we remember João Gilberto, the father of bossa nova, whose rise coincided with an all-too-brief cultural renaissance in Brazil.

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2019-07-19
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Editor?s Picks: July 18th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Donald Trump?s re-election campaign is likely to be even more racially divisive than his first. WhatsApp has become Africa?s most popular messaging platform but also a political tool to spread misinformation (8?22). And, drag performers in China are adapting to their socially conservative society (16?17).

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2019-07-18
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Unmoving movement: Venezuela?s bloody stalemate

The opposition?s momentum has faded; many protesters are too tired to go on. Nicolás Maduro, the illegitimate president, is showing his grip on power with shows of force. Global shipping is in a slump?but a visit to the Port of Rotterdam reveals that the industry itself got the message late. And, assessing whether the internet is as ruinous to language as many assume.

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2019-07-18
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Babbage: The next giant leap for mankind

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the launch of the Apollo 11 moon mission. Is humankind about to return there? And what do the next 50 years of space exploration hold? The task of moderating a platform with over two billion active users is a daunting one. Brent Harris, Facebook?s director of governance, explains his plans. And the science behind the search for the reddest red yet. Kenneth Cukier hosts

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2019-07-17
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In like a Leyen: the European Commission?s new president

Ursula von der Leyen has a tough task ahead, pressing a broad agenda in a fragmented European Parliament. We take a look at the vast international collaboration that is weather prediction, where it?s heading and how climate change could make it harder. And, why the villages of Japan are where to head if you love getting close to bears.

Additional sound by Solostud at Freesound.org.

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2019-07-17
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The Secret History of the Future: Unreliable Evidence

In the early 20th century a new forensic technique?fingerprinting?displaced a cruder form of identification based on body measurements. Hailed as modern, scientific, and infallible, fingerprinting was adopted around the world. But in recent years doubts have been cast on its reliability, and a new technique?DNA profiling?has emerged as the forensic gold standard. In assuming it is infallible, are we making the same mistake again?

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2019-07-17
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Money talks: How slow can you grow?

Last week?s episode asked how long American economic growth could last. Now, new figures reveal that China?s growth is the slowest in nearly three decades. What can the Chinese government do about it? Insurance companies make their money from predicting disaster, but as those risks change the industry is lagging behind. And England has won the Cricket World Cup in a controversial tiebreak??but are tiebreaks fair? Simon Long hosts

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2019-07-16
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At stake, chips: Japan-South Korea trade spat

A dispute about industrial chemicals reveals tensions that have remained unresolved since the second world war?and threatens the global electronics market. In the Indian state of Assam, a trumped-up rule on citizenship singles out Muslims for detention and deportation. And, a look at why American and European working hours have diverged so much.

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2019-07-16
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En liten tjänst av I'm With Friends. Finns även på engelska.
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