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Economist Radio

Economist Radio

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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Hawks, stocks and peril: Iran-America brinkmanship

Iran?s downing of an American drone today is just the latest source of tension between the countries. Where does it end? As facial-recognition technology improves, rising privacy concerns are hampering its adoption. And in Britain, advertisements that play to gender stereotypes are under more scrutiny from regulators and consumers.

Additional music by Lee Rosevere "Puzzle Pieces".

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2019-06-20
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Babbage: Facebucks

Facebook wants to create a global digital currency?what could possibly go wrong? Also, why billionaire Stephen Schwarzman, founder of Blackstone private-equity firm, is donating £150m to fund a humanities centre at Oxford University. And, what can be done to increase public trust in artificial intelligence? Kenneth Cukier hosts

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2019-06-19
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Moving stories: the UN?s refugee report

The worldwide count of people forced from their homelands has increased sharply, again. What?s driving these movements, and what are governments doing about incoming refugees? The Democratic Republic of Congo is suffering the world?s second-largest outbreak of Ebola?we ask why it hasn?t been declared an international emergency. And, why Thailand is getting into the weed business.

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2019-06-19
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Money talks: Banking bad

Deutsche Bank plans to create a new division, a ?bad bank?, which will hold tens of billions of euros of assets as part of an overhaul of it is operations. Will the remaining firm become profitable enough to satisfy regulators and investors? And the growing concern in China over balancing the books at a local level. Also, our correspondent takes a trip to Citeco ? France?s museum of economics. Patrick Foulis hosts

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2019-06-18
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Florida Man: Trump?s re-election campaign

America?s president heads back to the Sunshine State today to announce his candidacy. What to expect this time around? Muhammad Morsi, Egypt?s first democratically elected president, has died in court. We look back on his troubled leadership and ignominious end. And, this year?s Women?s World Cup is drawing much more attention than past tournaments, in part because of a long-overdue reckoning about money in the sport.

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2019-06-18
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Lam to the slaughter: Hong Kong?s shocking U-turn

Calls for the resignation of Carrie Lam, the territory?s leader, are intensifying. Hong Kongers may have put a recent freedom-crimping bill on ice, but more challenges to their independence await. We speak to the mother of a child genius who reveals the private agony of being an exceedingly clever kid. And, a new podcast in Latin gets our columnist thinking about language evolution and resurrection.

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2019-06-17
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The Economist asks: Armistead Maupin

Anne McElvoy asks the creator of ?Tales of the city? about what drew him back to 28 Barbary Lane and a new batch of tales of queer America. Fifty years on from the Stonewall riots that sparked the LGBT civil rights movement, Armistead Maupin talks about how far there is still to go, what young gay men can never understand about his generation and why he has finally decided to abandon his beloved San Francisco

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2019-06-14
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What?s yours has mines: the Gulf of Oman attack

America has blamed Iran for yesterday?s tanker attacks in the Gulf of Oman. If that?s true, Iran is playing a dangerous game that involves the whole of the region. The violent militias that control much of Rio de Janeiro might be easy to beat if they weren?t so well-connected. And, a breakaway hit reveals the racial fault lines in country music.

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2019-06-14
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Editor?s Picks: June 13th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, huge demonstrations in Hong Kong have rattled the territory?s government. (8:50) America?s biggest defence merger highlights the changing nature of war (17:11) And, why Australia?s pioneering image cloaks a nanny state

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2019-06-13
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Vlad the un-jailer: the Ivan Golunov case

An investigative journalist?s release may look like a press-freedom win in Russia?but it represents much more than that. Democratic presidential hopefuls have no shortage of transformative ideas, yet Senate arithmetic ensures there?s little hope of realising them. And, we visit a place where malaria rages while a cure literally grows on trees.

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2019-06-13
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Babbage: Space invaders

The business opportunities from small satellite technology are infinite: from an ?ambulance? which rescues malfunctioning spacecraft to devices that can measure the oil level in a tanker from space. Are we on the verge of making gene-editing technology safer? And, 50 years after man set foot on the moon, Oliver Morton, senior editor and author, predicts the future of humans? relationship with lunar exploration. Kenn Cukier hosts

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2019-06-12
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Once more, with felines: half the world gets online

Half of humanity is now online. What will the second half do when it logs on? The same as the first: friendly chat, personal expression and a lot of cat videos. Despite appearances, racism in America is actually going down; the problem is that America?s politics is increasingly fractured along racial lines. And, why is it that screams are so prevalent in popular culture?

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2019-06-12
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Money talks: All the presidents men

There are no women in the running to take over as the next President of the European Central Bank. And, lessons from the Woodford Investment group?even star fund-managers can struggle to outperform the market. Also, why do German billionaires avoid the limelight? Simon Long hosts

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2019-06-11
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Independence say: Hong Kong?s ongoing protests

A proposed change to the judicial system is just the latest sign that mainland China is exerting pressure on Hong Kong?s autonomy. Authorities seem ready to quell further demonstrations. Although solitary confinement is widely condemned, it?s still common in America; we speak with an inmate who?s spent half a lifetime in solitary. And, the sheikhs of Iraq who help resolve disputes?and are available for hire.

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2019-06-11
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No way to tweet a friend: Trump?s Mexico tariffs

In the end, President Donald Trump?s tariff threat did what he had hoped: Mexico has pledged to tighten immigration flows. But such weaponisation of tariffs bodes ill for the future. China?s ?green Great Wall? of trees?a bid to halt desertification?may be doing more harm than good. And, we meet some of the Filipino sailors who keep the global shipping industry afloat.

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2019-06-10
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Editor?s Picks: June 7th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the second half of humanity is joining the internet. Citizens of the emerging world will change the web and it will change them. Next, could the slaughter of pro-democracy protesters in Khartoum be Sudan?s Tiananmen? (7:43) And, why baseball reflects America?s desire to be different (14:39)

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2019-06-07
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Tory story: Britain?s next prime minister

Today Theresa May stepped down as leader of the Conservative Party, and would-be replacements are already lining up. There?s little hope that any would be able to arrange an elegant exit from Europe. Also, we take a look at the astonishing range of ailments that could be treated by magic mushrooms.

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2019-06-07
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The Economist asks: Who can lead Britain through Brexit?

Anne McElvoy speaks to two candidates in the race to succeed Theresa May as Conservative leader and Britain's prime minister. She catches up with Rory Stewart, the international development secretary, who proposes a ?citizens? assembly? to solve Brexit. And she asks the foreign secretary, Jeremy Hunt, how he would avoid a no-deal Brexit and about explaining the National Health Service to President Donald Trump

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2019-06-06
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Basta! The EU challenges Italy?s finances

European officials have threatened a substantial fine if Italy doesn?t shrink its debt and budget deficit. Whether or not it follows through, markets are already punishing the country. Tens of thousands of refugees have snuck into Canada from America, but as an election looms, the government is rethinking its openness. And, the plague of ?presenteeism?: when your work is done, just go home.

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2019-06-06
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Babbage: Fusing the future

In this week?s Babbage, Alok Jha investigates the organisations and companies trying to crack a technology that could solve all of the world?s energy problems in a stroke?nuclear fusion. From Iter, the world's largest collaborative fusion experiment, to private start-ups racing to be first, could the long-promised dream of nuclear fusion - to provide clean, limitless, carbon-free power - finally be about to come true?

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2019-06-05
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Same as the old boss? Crackdown in Sudan

Nearly two months after staging a coup, military leaders have brutally cracked down on protesters in Sudan. Talks with the opposition have fallen apart?as have hopes for a resurgent Sudanese democracy. We examine the rise in gun violence in Latin America and how much of it can be pinned on American-made weapons. And, a look at the striking effects of a striker: how one footballer?s image is reducing Islamophobia in Liverpool.

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2019-06-05
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Money talks: Tariffs at dawn

President Trump has started using import tariffs to win political as well as economic battles. What will be the impact of his latest threats to impose tariffs on Mexican goods? Also, how the US Federal Reserve is preparing for the next recession. And, how a toxic working environment can poison lives even among do-gooders. Simon Long hosts

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2019-06-04
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Thirty years of forgetting: Tiananmen

On the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square tragedy, our correspondents reflect on a dark and confusing day?and the Chinese government?s efforts to suppress the memory of it. Could such widespread dissent flare up in today?s China? Also, why laws requiring immigrants to speak host-nations? languages are counter-productive.

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2019-06-04
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Get pomped up: Trump?s British visit

President Donald Trump kicks off his state visit to Britain with some opening shots at London's mayor Sadiq Khan. But larger issues will take center stage. Amid Brexit, a leadership contest and simmering security tensions, we discuss the strains to the ?special relationship?. We consider how regulators and the tech giants can tackle the wilds of the internet to make browsing safe for children. And, a Ramadan drama in Saudi Arabia that reveals how the crown prince wants his kingdom to be perceived.

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2019-06-03
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The Economist asks: Who will run tomorrow?s top companies?

Anne McElvoy asks Ursula Burns about how she became the first black woman to run a Fortune 500 company. She explains why she now champions gender quotas, having vehemently opposed them. And, as AI threatens more traditional jobs, how CEOs should balance protecting profits with protecting their employees

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2019-05-31
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Protectionist racket: trade-war rhetoric

As President Donald Trump threatens new tariffs on Mexican goods, retaliatory ones between China and America are starting to bite. That puts China?s party leaders?and their hardening nationalist message?in a tricky spot. We examine how the global grounding of Boeing?s 737 MAX planes might change air-safety regulation. And a visit to Venice?s Biennale, where immigration and climate change are taking centre stage.

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2019-05-31
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Editor?s Picks: May 30th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Britain?s constitutional time-bomb. Brexit is already a political crisis?sooner or later it will become a constitutional one too. How floods and storms in the Midwest are altering American attitudes to climate change (9?24). And, 30 years after the Tiananmen Square massacre, many Chinese know little about the bloodshed (18?07)

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2019-05-30
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Likudn?t: Israel?s political crisis

For the first time since Israel?s founding, efforts to form a government have failed. What will the resulting snap election mean for Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu? Alleged meddling in the Czech judiciary has sparked protests; it seems that challenges to the rule of law are proliferating in eastern Europe. And, we visit Crimea?s winemakers, who are struggling after annexation by Russia.

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2019-05-30
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Babbage: Rash behaviour

The measles resurgence around the world has been blamed on parents refusing to vaccinate their children but is vaccinating children enough? Also, how a new glove for humans is teaching robots how to feel. And Kenneth Cukier asks Carl Benedikt Frey, economic historian, what can be learnt from the industrial revolution in today?s world of automation and robots.

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2019-05-29
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Baba Go Slow: Nigeria?s President gets another term

Muhammadu Buhari earned the nickname ?Baba Go Slow? for a lackadaisical approach to reform as Nigeria?s president. He mismanaged the economy, failed to tackle corruption and has been unable to restrain the terrorist group Boko Haram. Will he be more effective in his second term? Also, why so many climbers are perishing on the slopes of Everest. And for the first time in football history, clubs from just one nation compete in Europe?s top tournaments. How England?s Premier League teams have outperformed expectations.

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2019-05-29
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Money talks: Just the job

The received wisdom is that work is becoming low-paid and precarious, with jobs lost to automation and the gig economy. The data say otherwise. What does the jobs boom in the rich world mean for the global economy? Also, will Alibaba?s plans to list in Hong Kong start a corporate shift away from Wall Street? And, the role of clearing houses in averting financial crises. Philip Coggan hosts

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2019-05-28
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Continental breakfast: European elections

Europe?s voters have shown they are not happy with traditional parties. But even as the Brexit Party surged in Britain, populists across the continent found elections to the European Parliament tougher than expected, while the Green Party made a strong showing, buoyed by climate concerns. Despite being "asset-light", some tech companies need property to keep expanding. That?s good news for real-estate investment trusts. And quinoa is the grain getting a new lease of life.

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2019-05-28
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The world ahead: Food for thought

After the successful stockmarket flotation of Beyond Meat, maker of the Beyond Burger, we assess the potential impact of meat substitutes on global meat consumption. Also, is space tourism about to take off? And what can be done to preserve indigenous languages for future generations. Tom Standage hosts.

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2019-05-27
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The Economist asks: Are the Victorians a model for Brexit Britain?

With Theresa May on her way out of 10 Downing Street and Britain no closer to achieving the Brexit she promised, Anne McElvoy takes the long view. She asks Jacob Rees-Mogg, a Conservative MP, and Tristram Hunt, director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, to debate how the titans of the 19th century shaped modern Britain. What would Queen Victoria do? And who in the Conservative party do they tip to take over the leadership?

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2019-05-24
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This May hurt: British politics

Britain?s prime minister Theresa May has at last revealed the date she will step down. She had the unenviable task of trying to deliver Brexit, which she failed to, and her successor may not fare any better. President Donald Trump has lost crucial legal battles over his financial records, and more defeats are likely if the cases head to the Supreme Court. And, why is it that some music can give you chills? Additional music: ?Try Again? by Posthuman, ?Blackwall? by Snakebitesmile.

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2019-05-24
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Editor?s Picks: May 23rd 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, India?s ruling Bharatiya Janata party has won a second landslide victory. The prime minister, Narendra Modi, should make better use of his latest triumph. Can China, home to half the world?s pigs, curb the epidemic of African swine flu (6?28)? And Brazil faces painful disagreement over how to commemorate its history of slavery (12?54)

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2019-05-23
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Repeat performance: India?s election

Narendra Modi?s BJP appears to have won a convincing re-election victory. What will that mean for India and the region? We look back on the life of Bob Hawke, a former Australian prime minister who convinced the world that his country deserved a place in global politics. And, why Silicon Valley?s latest obsession is optimising sleepy time.

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2019-05-23
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Babbage: Data to the rescue

Access to the right data can be as valuable in humanitarian crises as water or medical care, but it can also be dangerous. Misused or in the wrong hands, the same information can put already vulnerable people at further risk. Kenneth Cukier hosts this special edition of Babbage examining how humanitarian organisations use data and what they can learn from the profit-making tech industry. This episode was recorded live from Wilton Park, in collaboration with the United Nations OCHA Centre for Humanitarian Data

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2019-05-22
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Ibiza remix: Austria and the European fringe

As a scandal involving Austria?s hard-right Freedom party causes the government to unravel, we examine the fringe parties of Europe and their chances in this week?s European election. As tech billionaires continue to indulge their obsession with space travel, we look at the sketchy economics of moving off-world. And, a stark warning for lovers of avocados: supply concerns make it a volatile brunch choice.

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2019-05-22
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Money talks: When the chips are down

How will the Trump administration?s restrictions affect Huawei?can the world?s second biggest smartphone maker adapt to not doing business with America? Michael Froman, a former US trade representative and the vice-chairman of MasterCard, discusses how private companies themselves can promote freer trade. And Jennifer Eberhardt, a professor of psychology, on the science of racial bias. Simon Long hosts

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2019-05-21
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In a heartbeat: abortion in America

The strict anti-abortion bills cropping up in multiple American states aren?t expected to become the law of the land?but proponents want them to chip away at Roe v Wade, which is. Attacks on albinos have risen ahead of Malawi?s presidential election; we discuss the superstitions driving the violence. And, why young Americans are having so little sex.

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2019-05-21
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Battle for legitimacy: Afghanistan v the Taliban

After 18 years and almost a trillion dollars to fight the Taliban, Afghanistan?s government still struggles for legitimacy; we ask why. A list of the world?s ultra-rich reveals a disproportionate number of self-made female billionaires from China?but the trend isn?t set to continue. And we examine why presidential libraries are so controversial, and why Barack Obama?s is no exception.

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2019-05-20
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The Economist asks: Cass Sunstein

Anne McElvoy asks Cass Sunstein, a former advisor to Barack Obama and co-author of "Nudge", how far the state should define our quest for personal freedom. They discuss how we might need a GPS to navigate through life, the limits of nudging and why left-wing Democrats might be their own worst enemy

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2019-05-17
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Private iniquity? The Abraaj case

Not long ago, Abraaj was one of the world?s highest-profile private-equity firms. We take a look at its spectacular downfall, and the fate of its charismatic boss, Arif Naqvi. This weekend Australian voters will elect a new parliament. How can politicians win back a disillusioned electorate? And why do sausages figure so strongly on voting day?

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2019-05-17
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Editor?s Picks: May 16th 2019

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, as the rivalry between China and the United States grows, surging sanctions create both risks and unexpected business opportunities. Why the feeble Afghan government is losing the war against the Taliban (10?23). And a tale of golden fleeces?why people in Senegal pay a fortune for fancy sheep (20?19)

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2019-05-16
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May, EU live in interesting times: Brexit

As party leaders grill Britain?s prime minister?and with a looming European election the country was due to avoid?we examine how the Brexit mess is dissolving party allegiances. Turkey was once seen as a success story in dealing with Syrians fleeing conflict, but as war has dragged on their welcome is wearing thin. And, kinky and camp meet fraught politics in this year?s Eurovision Song Contest.

Additional music "Thoughtful" and "Under Suspicion" by Lee Rosevere.

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2019-05-16
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Babbage: Facing the future?

Legislators in San Francisco have just voted to ban the use of facial recognition?is this a victory for privacy or a setback for technology? Also, new research on how machine learning can be used to predict the likelihood of breast cancer. And Amazon's boss, Jeff Bezos, draws inspiration from science fiction in his aim to build space habitats. Kenneth Cukier hosts

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2019-05-15
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Don?t spend it all at once: Pakistan and the IMF

The International Monetary Fund has struck another deal to bail out Pakistan?its 22nd. But how did the country?s economy end up in such a mess? Never mind rising numbers of vegetarians: the world is eating more meat, and in a way, that?s a good thing. And, how French names reveal social trends that census data cannot.

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2019-05-15
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Money talks: A US-China game of nerves

Two-way trade between America and China hit $2bn a day last year. But the growing mistrust between the two countries is turning business from a safe space into a field of contention. David Rennie, The Economist?s Beijing bureau chief, has travelled across both countries and found that, with China?s daunting rise, making money is no longer enough to keep friendly relations.

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2019-05-14
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Supply demands: Yemen peace talks

UN negotiators are trying to salvage a ceasefire agreement surrounding the Yemeni port city of Hodeidah. The Arab world?s poorest country is suffering mightily, but the patchwork of actors makes a successful deal ever more difficult. In Latin America, democracy has stalled as economies have stagnated. Yet for democracy to succeed elsewhere, its Latin American shoots must be preserved. And, a splashy apartment building in Bulgaria that?s become emblematic of graft.

Additional music "Chez Space" by The Freeharmonic Orchestra.

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2019-05-14
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En liten tjänst av I'm With Friends. Finns även på engelska.
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