Sveriges 100 mest populära podcasts

The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

*** Named a best podcast of 2021 by Time, Vulture, Esquire and The Atlantic. *** Each Tuesday and Friday, Ezra Klein invites you into a conversation on something that matters. How do we address climate change if the political system fails to act? Has the logic of markets infiltrated too many aspects of our lives? What is the future of the Republican Party? What do psychedelics teach us about consciousness? What does sci-fi understand about our present that we miss? Can our food system be just to humans and animals alike?

Prenumerera

iTunes / Overcast / RSS

Webbplats

nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast

Avsnitt

The Case for Prosecuting Trump

The Jan. 6 hearings have made it clear that Donald Trump led a concerted, monthslong effort to overturn a democratic election. The extensive interviews ? over 1,000 ? that the House select committee conducted prove that Trump was told there was no evidence of election fraud, but he pressed his anti-democratic case regardless. And it appears that the hearings may be making an impact on public opinion: An ABC News/Ipsos survey released Sunday found that 58 percent of respondents believe Trump should be charged with a crime for his role in the Jan. 6 attack, up from 52 percent in April.

But after all the evidence comes to light, will he actually face legal consequences? If the answer is no, then what might future presidents ? including, perhaps, Trump himself ? be emboldened to do? And what would that mean for the future of the American political system?

Jamelle Bouie is a Times Opinion columnist and co-host of the podcast ?Unclear and Present Danger.? Bouie brings a remarkable historical depth to his writing about American politics. His columns about Jan. 6 ? and the troubling idiosyncrasies of Trump?s presidency before it ? have shown how the former president?s illiberal actions have threatened the constitutional foundation of American government. So I asked him on the show to help me process the Jan. 6 hearings with an eye to America?s past, and also to its uncertain future.

We discuss why Jan. 6 may be not just an insurrection but ?a kind of revolution or, at least, the very beginning of one?; how the anti-democratic nature of the American Constitution makes our system vulnerable to demagogues like Trump; the most important takeaways from the hearings so far; what could happen in 2024 if Trump is allowed to walk free; what Trump allies are already doing to gain power over elections; why refusing to prosecute Trump would itself be a ?radical act?; why Republicans have grown increasingly suspicious of ? and hostile to ? representative democracy; why Bouie thinks prosecuting Trump would be worth the political fallout it would cause; and more.

Mentioned:

?Trump Had a Mob. He Also Had a Plan.? by Jamelle Bouie

?America Punishes Only a Certain Kind of Rebel? by Jamelle Bouie

?Prosecute Trump? Put Yourself in Merrick Garland?s Shoes.? by Jack Goldsmith

Book recommendations:

Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men by Eric Foner

Salmon P. Chase by Walter Stahr

What It Took to Win by Michael Kazin

We're hiring a researcher! You can apply here or by visiting nytimes.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/News

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Rollin Hu, Mary Marge Locker and Kate Sinclair; mixing and original music by Isaac Jones; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-06-24
Länk till avsnitt

Two Years Later, We Still Don?t Understand Long Covid. Why?

Depending on the data you look at, between 10 and 40 percent of people who get Covid will still have symptoms months later. For some, those symptoms will be modest. A cough, some fatigue. For others, they?ll be life-altering: Debilitating brain fog. Exhaustion. Cardiovascular problems. Blood clotting.

This is what we call long Covid. It?s one term for a vast range of experiences, symptoms, outcomes. It?s one term that may be hiding a vast range of maladies and causes. So what do we actually know about long Covid? What don?t we know? And why don?t we know more than we do?

Dr. Lekshmi Santhosh is an assistant professor at UCSF Medical Center, and the founder and medical director of UCSF?s long Covid and post-ICU clinic. Her clinic opened in May 2020 and was one of the first to focus on treating long Covid patients specifically. We discuss the wildly broad range of symptoms that can qualify as long Covid; the confusing overlaps between Covid symptoms and other diseases; whether age, race, sex and pre-existing conditions affect a person?s chances of contracting long Covid; why it?s so difficult to answer a seemingly simple question like, ?How many people have gotten long Covid??; what to make of a recent study that seemingly undermines the biological existence of long Covid; how worried we should be about correlations between Covid and medical disasters like heart attacks, strokes and abnormal blood clotting; and more.

Mentioned:

?Post?COVID Conditions Among Adult COVID-19 Survivors Aged 18?64 and ?65 Years ? United States, March 2020?November 2021? by Lara Bull-Otterson, Sarah Baca1, Sharon Saydah, Tegan K. Boehmer, Stacey Adjei, Simone Gray and Aaron M. Harris

?Long COVID after breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infection? by Ziyad Al-Aly, Benjamin Bowe and Yan Xie

?A Longitudinal Study of COVID-19 Sequelae and Immunity: Baseline Findings? by Michael C. Sneller, C. Jason Liang, Adriana R. Marques, et al.

?Positive Epstein?Barr virus detection in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients? by Ting Chen, Jiayi Song, Hongli Liu, Hongmei Zheng and Changzheng Chen

?Risk factors and disease profile of post-vaccination SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK users of the COVID Symptom Study app? by Michela Antonelli, Rose S. Penfold, Jordi Merino, Carole H. Sudre, Erika Molteni, Sarah Berry, et al.

?Understanding and Improving Recovery From COVID-19? by Aluko A. Hope

?Markers of Immune Activation and Inflammation in Individuals With Postacute Sequelae of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Infection? by Michael J. Peluso, Scott Lu, Alex F. Tang, Matthew S. Durstenfeld, et al.

Book Recommendations:

In Shock by Dr. Rana Awdish

Every Deep-Drawn Breath by Wes Ely

Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder

We're hiring a researcher! You can apply here or by visiting nytimes.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/News

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Haylee Millikan and Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin, Kristina Samulewski, Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly and Lauren Nichols.

2022-06-21
Länk till avsnitt

The End of 'The Everything Bubble'

This week, the S&P 500 entered what analysts refer to as a bear market. The index has plunged around 22 percent from its most recent peak in January. Many growth stocks and crypto assets have crashed double or triple that amount.

New home sales declined 17 percent in April, causing some analysts to argue that the housing market has peaked. And, in response to rising inflation, the Federal Reserve just approved its largest interest rate increase since 1994, meaning asset prices could dip even lower.

To understand what?s happening in the stock market right now, you have to understand the era that preceded it. Rana Foroohar is a columnist at The Financial Times, and the author of several books on the economy including ?Makers and Takers? and ?Don?t Be Evil.? Her view is that a decade-plus of loose monetary policy has been the economic equivalent of a ?sugar high,? which kept the prices of stocks, housing and other assets going up and up and up, even as the fundamentals of the economy have been eroding. This ?everything bubble,? as she calls it, was bound to burst ? and that?s exactly what she thinks is happening right now.

So I wanted to have her on the show to discuss the economic choices ? and lack thereof ? that led to this point. We also discuss why the increasing power of the financial sector hasn?t resulted a stronger economy, whether the housing market has indeed hit its peak, the massive missed opportunity for public investment while interest rates were low, why policymakers treat asset price inflation so differently from other types of inflation, the true costs of the meat we eat and clothes we wear, why crypto represents the apotheosis of hyper-financialized capitalism, why I?m skeptical of the argument that we?re moving rapidly toward a less globalized world and more.

Book recommendations:

All That She Carried by Tiya Miles

Beautiful Country by Qian Julie Wang

The Rise and Fall of the Neoliberal Order by Gary Gerstle

We're hiring a researcher! You can apply here or by visiting nytimes.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/News

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris and Andrea López Cruzado; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-06-17
Länk till avsnitt

Is Climate Change a Reason to Avoid Having Children? and Other Listener Questions Answered

It?s that time of year, when we invite listeners to send in questions, and I answer them on the air. And as usual, you delivered. I?m joined by my producer Annie Galvin, who asks me some of the most intriguing questions of the many we received: Is climate change a reason to forgo having kids? What would happen if Trump were allowed to return to Twitter, in the event of an Elon Musk acquisition? Should Biden run again in 2024? Is wokeness killing the Democratic Party?

We also discuss the recent congressional hearing about U.F.O. sightings; whether it?s a good thing that so many talented young people are going to work in consulting, finance and corporate law; the worrisome anti-institutional direction of the Republican Party; why government is failing to deliver on liberals? policies and promises ? and how to start fixing that problem; whether Americans? distrust in institutions is warranted; why I could use some recommendations for a good reading chair; and more.

Mentioned:

We're hiring a researcher! You can apply here or by visiting nytimes.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/News

?Your Kids Are Not Doomed? by Ezra Klein

?Empirically Grounded Technology Forecasts and the Energy Transition? by Rupert Way, Matthew Ives, Penny Mealy and J. Doyne Farmer

?Ibram X. Kendi on What Conservatives ? and Liberals ? Get Wrong About Antiracism? by The Ezra Klein Show

?A Different Way of Thinking About Cancel Culture? by Ezra Klein

Public Citizens by Paul Sabin

?This Is Why Your Holiday Travel Is Awful? by Marc J. Dunkelman

?Are We More Polarized? Or Just Weirder?? by The Ezra Klein Show

?Donald Trump Didn?t Hijack the G.O.P. He Understood It.? by The Ezra Klein Show

?Robert Sapolsky on the Toxic Intersection of Poverty and Stress? by Vox Conversations

Book Recommendations:

Amusing Ourselves to Death by Neil Postman

The Invention of Nature by Andrea Wulf

Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney

Music Recommendations:

?Spring 1? by Max Richter

Christian Löffler

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-06-14
Länk till avsnitt

Socialism Is Supposed to Be a Working-Class Movement. Why Isn?t It?

American socialists today find themselves in a tenuous position. Over the past decade, the left has become a powerful force in American politics. Bernie Sanders seriously contested two presidential primaries. Democratic socialists have won local, state and congressional races. Organizations like Democratic Socialists of America and socialist publications like Jacobin have become part of the political conversation.

But the progressive left?s successes have been largely concentrated in well-educated, heavily blue districts, and the movement that claims to represent the interests of workers consistently fails to make meaningful inroads with working-class voters. As a result, socialists have struggled to build broad, lasting political power at any level of government.

?We might feel more confident about the prospects for the left if, rather than a momentary shift leftward in liberal economic priorities or the rhetoric of certain parts of the mainstream media, there had been deeper inroads made among workers,? writes Bhaskar Sunkara. ?There have been rare exceptions, but on the whole, it would be delusional to say that our ideological left has made a decade of progress merging with a wider social base.?

Sunkara is the founding editor of Jacobin and the president of The Nation, two of the leading publications on the American left. He recently published an issue of Jacobin titled ?The Left in Purgatory,? which attempts to grapple with the left?s failures, interrogate its political strategies and chart a path for American socialists to win over more working-class voters. So I invited him on the show to lay out where the left is now, and where he thinks it needs to go next.

We discuss whether the left learned the wrong lessons from the Sanders 2016 campaign, why working-class voters across the world have increasingly abandoned left-wing parties, the fundamental error in Sanders?s theory of the 2020 electorate, why winning over working-class voters is just as much about a candidate?s aesthetic as it is about policy, why Sunkara is pessimistic that the socialists who came after Bernie will be able to match his widespread appeal, the ?end of the A.O.C. honeymoon? on the left, what a ?supply-side socialism? could look like, the tension between the left?s desire for government to do big things and its skepticism of concentrated power, why it costs so much to build in America, why Sunkara is worried about America?s ?thin associative democracy? and more.

Mentioned:

?Brahmin Left versus Merchant Right: Changing Political Cleavages in 21 Western Democracies, 1948-2020? by Amory Gethin, Clara Martínez-Toledano and Thomas Piketty

Infrastructure issue from Jacobin

"The End of the A.O.C. Honeymoon" by Natalie Shure

Book recommendations:

Socialism: Past and Future by Michael Harrington

The Age of Extremes by Eric Hobsbawm

The South by Adolph L. Reed, Jr.

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Rollin Hu and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-06-10
Länk till avsnitt

Thomas Piketty?s Case For ?Participatory Socialism?

The French economist Thomas Piketty is arguably the world?s greatest chronicler of economic inequality. For decades now, he has collected huge data sets documenting the share of income and wealth that has flowed to the top 1 percent. And the culmination of much of that work, his 2013 book ?Capital in the Twenty-First Century,? quickly became one of the most widely read and cited economic texts in recent history.

Piketty?s new book, ?A Brief History of Equality,? is perhaps his most optimistic work. In it, he chronicles the immense social progress that the U.S. and Europe have achieved over the past few centuries in the form of rising educational attainment, life expectancy and incomes. Of course, those societies still contain huge inequalities of wealth. But in Piketty?s view, this outcome isn?t an inevitability; it?s the product of policy choices that we collectively make ? and could choose to make differently. And to that end, Piketty proposes a truly radical policy agenda ? a universal minimum inheritance of around $150,000 per person, worker control over the boards of corporations and ?confiscatory? levels of wealth and income taxation ? that he calls ?participatory socialism.?

So this conversation isn?t just about the current state of inequality; it?s about the kind of policies ? and politics ? it would take to solve that inequality. We discuss why wealth is a far more accurate indicator of social power than income, the quality of the historical data that Piketty?s work relies on, why Piketty believes the welfare state ? not capitalism itself ? is the most important driver of human progress, why representative democracy hasn?t led to more economic redistribution, whether equality is really the best metric to measure human progress in the first place, how Piketty would pay for his universal inheritance proposal, whether the levels of taxation he is proposing would stifle innovation and wreck the economy, why he believes it would be better for societies ? and economic productivity ? for workers to have a much larger say in how companies are governed, how Piketty thinks about the prospect of inflation and more.

Mentioned:

The Great Leveler by Walter Scheidel

?Anne Applebaum on What Liberals Misunderstand About Authoritarianism? by The Ezra Klein Show

Book Recommendations:

The Great Demarcation by Rafe Blaufarb

The Emergence of Globalism by Or Rosenboim

The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt

We're hiring a researcher! You can apply here or by visiting nytimes.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/News

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-06-07
Länk till avsnitt

A Conservative's View on Democrats' Biggest Weakness

?There is definitely a contest for the future of the center right,? says Reihan Salam, the president of the Manhattan Institute, a conservative think tank. In his telling, one side in this contest is ?deeply pessimistic about the prospect of a diversifying America, explicitly anti-urban and increasingly willing to embrace redistribution and centralized power,? more so than conservatism before Donald Trump. This populist right has received a lot of attention since Trump?s election, and we?ve done other shows to try to understand it.

But Salam is advancing a very different set of ideas with a very different theory of the electorate. He?s identified what he sees as a core fissure between the progressive elites who run the Democratic Party and the working-class voters of color who make up a large part of its base ? particularly on issues of race and gender. And he believes that by putting forward an ?urban conservative? agenda centered on education, housing and public safety, Republicans can exploit those internal cleavages and begin to win over demographics that have been central to the Democratic coalition.

So for the final episode in our ?The Rising Right? series, I wanted to use Salam?s thoughts to explore this alternate path for the American right. We discuss why the Republican Party has turned against major cities, whether antiracism is the right framework for addressing racial inequality, why he believes that children of Latino and Asian immigrants could become a core G.O.P. constituency, the difference between antiracism and ?antiracialism,? the tactics of the anti-critical-race-theory movement, why he thinks there?s been an ?overcorrection? on the right in favor of state power and redistribution, what a supply-side conservatism beyond just tax cuts could look like, why he believes we could be entering an era of ?fiscal constraints? that could radically reshape policymaking on both the left and right and more.

Mentioned:

?The Anti-C.R.T. Movement and a Vision For a New Right Wing? by Jay Caspian Kang

?America Needs Anti-Racialism? by Reihan Salam

?Ibram X. Kendi on What Conservatives ? and Liberals ? Get Wrong About Antiracism? by The Ezra Klein Show

?Prison-Gang Politics? by Christopher F. Rufo

Book recommendations:

Classified by David E. Bernstein

Criminal (In)Justice by Rafael A. Mangual

Sir Vidia?s Shadow by Paul Theroux

The Strategy of Denial by Elbridge A. Colby

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Rollin Hu and Mary Marge Locker; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing and engineering by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-06-03
Länk till avsnitt

Sex, Abortion and Feminism, as Seen From the Right

For decades, the conservative position on abortion has been simple: Appoint justices who will overturn Roe V. Wade. That aspiration is now likely to become reality. The question of abortion rights will re-enter the realm of electoral politics in a way it hasn?t for 50 years. And that means Republicans will need to develop a new politics of abortion ? a politics that may appeal not only to their anti-abortion base but to some of the many Americans who believe Roe should stand.

One place those Republicans may look for inspiration is to the work of the legal scholar Erika Bachiochi. She is a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, director of the Wollstonecraft Project at the Abigail Adams Institute and the author of ?The Rights of Women: Reclaiming a Lost Vision,? where she argues for a ?dignitarian feminism.? Bachiochi embraces women?s gains in professional and civic life but holds that techno-pharmacological birth control, the sexual revolution and the legalization of abortion have created a sexual and family culture that has ultimately been devastating to women?s well-being.

In hopes of improving that status quo, Bachiochi puts forward a policy agenda that could very well become the post-Roe playbook for some Republicans: tighter abortion restrictions combined with a robust slate of family policies ? some of which would be even bolder than the Biden administration?s proposals to date. Hers is not an argument I agree with, but it?s one that I imagine will become increasingly salient in a post-Roe America.

In the third episode of our series ?The Rising Right,? we discuss Bachiochi?s views on why the ?gender revolution? has stalled; her belief that market logic has come to dominate our understandings of family, parenting, sex and feminism; her critique of modern ?hookup? culture; and her pro-family economic agenda. And we debate whether it?s realistic to encourage the use of natural fertility regulation over hormonal contraception, how abortion relates to single motherhood and poverty, whether stricter abortion laws might benefit or hurt poor women, what role the law should play in teaching moral behavior, whether progressives have become too ?Lockean? in their understanding of bodily autonomy, whether the sexual revolution gave people too much choice and more.

Mentioned:

Defenders of the Unborn by Daniel K. Williams

Generation Unbound by Isabel V. Sawhill

?Equal Rights, Equal Wrongs? by Christopher Kaczor

Book recommendations:

Rights Talk by Mary Ann Glendon

Feminism Without Illusions by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese

Public Man, Private Woman by Jean Bethke Elshtain

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Kate Sinclair, Mary Marge Locker and Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing and engineering by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-05-31
Länk till avsnitt

Best Of: Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ta-Nehisi Coates on the Fight Over U.S. History

What does it mean to reckon with the violence, the tragedy, and the numerous contradictions of America? 

That is the focus of this conversation ? originally aired in July of 2021 ? with Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ta- Nehisi Coates. On one level, the conversation is a reflection on the fights over teaching critical race theory and the 1619 Project. But it is really focused on the deeper meaning behind those skirmishes: The ongoing fight over the story we tell about America and why that fight has so gripped our national discourse. What changes when a country?s sense of its own history changes? What changes when who gets to tell that story changes? What are the stakes here, and why now?

My guests for this conversation need little introduction. Nikole Hannah-Jones is an investigative journalist for the New York Times Magazine where she led the 1619 Project, and, before that, did incredible work on racial inequality in the American education system. Ta-Nehisi Coates is the author of books including ?Between the World and Me? and ?The Water Dancer,? essays including ?The Case for Reparations,? and, for Marvel Comics, ?Captain America? and ?Black Panther.? Each of them has won more prestigious awards for their work than I could possibly list here, and both will be taking faculty positions at Howard University.

We discuss the 1619 Project, whether patriotism can coexist with shame and regret, the political power of American exceptionalism, the cracked foundations of American democracy, how journalism is and should be taught, our relationships to Twitter, what journalists can learn from children and much more. It's a conversation that feels just as relevant today as when it first aired. 

Nikole Hannah-Jones book recommendations:

Black Reconstruction in America, 1860-1880 by W.E.B Du Bois

The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson

Ta-Nehisi Coates book recommendations:

Postwar by Tony Judt

Avengers of the New World by Laurent Dubois

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein.

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-05-27
Länk till avsnitt

A Conversation With Ada Limón, in Six Poems

???One of the biggest things about poetry is that it holds all of humanity,? the poet Ada Limón tells me. ?It holds the huge and enormous and tumbling sphere of human emotions.?

When the news feels sodden with violence and division, it can be hard to know where to put the difficult emotions it provokes. Poetry may seem an unlikely destination for those emotions, especially to those who don?t read it regularly. But Limón?s poems are unique for the deep attention they pay to both the world?s wounds and its redemptive beauty. In otherwise dark times, they have the power to open us up to the wonder and awe that the world still inspires.

Limón?s books of poetry ? like her 2018 collection, ?The Carrying,? which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and her 2015 collection, ?Bright Dead Things? ? are filled with meditations on grief and infertility, as well as striking moments of insight about friendship, lust and our fellowship with animals. Her most recent book, ?The Hurting Kind,? explores what it means to share the planet with nonhuman beings like birds and trees. Limón describes the marvels of Kentucky?s rural landscape and the dusky beauty of a New York City bar with equal care. Her writing is highly acclaimed by fellow poets and also delightfully accessible to those who have never before picked up a book of poetry.

Limón is a lively reader of her own poetry, so to structure this conversation, I asked her to read a varied selection of her work. We use those readings to discuss what poetry gives us that the news doesn?t, the importance of slowing down in a world that demands speed, how the grief of infertility differs from that of losing a loved one, how to be ?in community? with ancestors and animals in lonely times, why Limón loves ?chatty? and humorous poems as much as serious ones, why we often have our best thoughts in cars and on planes, how Instagram and Twitter affect our relationship to the world, why Limón meditates every day, how our relationship to excitement changes as we age and more.

Book Recommendations:

Stones by Kevin Young

Frank: Sonnets by Diane Seuss

Postcolonial Love Poem by Natalie Diaz

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Haylee Millikan; original music by Isaac Jones and Jeff Geld; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin, Kristina Samulewski, Rebecca Elise Foote and Jahan Ramazani.

2022-05-24
Länk till avsnitt

The Ethics of Abortion

When Justice Samuel Alito?s draft opinion on Dobbs v. Jackson Women?s Health Organization leaked a few weeks ago, it signaled that Roe v. Wade appears likely to be overturned in a matter of weeks. If Roe falls, questions about the right to abortion will re-enter the realm of electoral politics in a way they haven?t for 50 years. States will be solely in charge of determining whether abortion is permitted, under what conditions it should be permitted, and what the appropriate thresholds are for making those decisions.

That means ordinary voters and their representatives will be forced to grapple with the moral ? even metaphysical ? quandaries at the heart of the abortion debate. What does it mean to belong to the human species, and when does that belonging begin? Is there a bright line at which an egg, a blastula, or a fetus attains the status of ?person?? And how do we weigh the competing interests of mothers, families, and fetuses against one another? Those questions are the foundation on top of which abortion law and policy is built.

Kate Greasley is a law professor at the University of Oxford in the U.K., where she studies, among other things, the legal and moral philosophy of abortion. She?s the author of ?Arguments About Abortion: Personhood, Morality, and Law,? and co-author of ?Abortion Rights: For and Against? alongside Christopher Kaczor, a philosopher who opposes abortion. While Greasley ultimately believes in the right to choose, she does a remarkably comprehensive job of carefully and fairly considering all the arguments, contradictions and nuances of this issue.

We discuss why both progressives and conservatives should be open to questioning their preconceptions about abortion, what the Bible does ? and doesn?t ? suggest about abortion, why the status of fetal life is the central question at the heart of abortion ethics, whether life begins at conception or emerges later in fetal development, how the complex, messy moral intuitions that most of us have around questions of life and death don?t lend themselves neatly to either an abortion rights or anti-abortion camp, why late-term abortions pose particularly challenging moral questions, how the pregnant person?s bodily autonomy weighs against the fetus?s and more.

Mentioned:

?Can Fetuses Feel Pain?? by Stuart Derbyshire

Book recommendations:

Beyond Roe by David Boonin

Abortion: Three Perspectives by Michael Tooley, Celia Wolf-Devine, Philip E. Devine and Alison M. Jaggar

About Abortion by Carol Sanger

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Rollin Hu and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing and engineering by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-05-20
Länk till avsnitt

Anne Applebaum on What Liberals Misunderstand About Authoritarianism

The experience of reading Hannah Arendt?s 1951 classic ?The Origins of Totalitarianism? in the year 2022 is a disorienting one. Although Arendt is writing primarily about Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia, her descriptions often capture aspects of our present moment more clearly than those of us living through it can ever hope to.

Arendt writes of entire populations who ?had reached the point where they would, at the same time, believe everything and nothing, think that everything was possible and that nothing was true.? She describes ?the masses? escape from reality? as ?a verdict against the world in which they are forced to live and in which they cannot exist.? She points out that in societies riddled with elite hypocrisy, ?it seemed revolutionary to admit cruelty, disregard of human values, and general amorality, because this at least destroyed the duplicity upon which the existing society seemed to rest.?

It?s hard to read statements like these without immediately conjuring up images of Vladimir Putin?s Russia or Donald Trump?s presidency or the QAnon faithful. But that?s exactly the point: The reason Arendt is so relevant today is that her diagnosis doesn?t apply just to the Nazi or Soviet regimes she was writing about. It is more fundamentally about the characteristics of liberal societies that make them vulnerable to distinctly illiberal and authoritarian forces ? weaknesses that, in many ways, have only become more pronounced in the 70 years since ?The Origins of Totalitarianism? was first released.

Anne Applebaum is a staff writer for The Atlantic and a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian. Her writing ? including her most recent book, ?Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism? ? is focused on the resurgence of autocratic movements and governments around the world, and why members of Western societies have abandoned liberal democratic ideals in favor of strongman leaders, conspiratorial movements and authoritarian regimes. And in the introduction she wrote to a new edition of ?The Origins of Totalitarianism,? Applebaum argues that Arendt?s insights are more relevant now than ever.

So this is a conversation that uses Arendt?s analysis as a window into our present. Applebaum and I discuss how ?radical loneliness? lays the groundwork for authoritarianism, what Putin and Trump understand about human nature that most liberals miss, the seductive allure of groups like QAnon, the way that modern propaganda feeds off a combination of gullibility and cynicism, whether liberalism?s own logic is making societies vulnerable to totalitarian impulses, why efforts by populist politicians to upend conventional morality have held such appeal in Western liberal democracies, how the ideology of ?economism? blinds Western liberals to their own societies? deepest vulnerabilities, what liberals need to do differently to counteract the rise of global autocracy and more.

Mentioned:

?Review of Adolph Hitler?s ?Mein Kampf?? by George Orwell

Book Recommendations:

Cuba by Ada Ferrer

The Lincoln Highway by Amor Towles

The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Rollin Hu, Mary Marge Locker and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-05-17
Länk till avsnitt

What Does the ?Post-Liberal Right? Actually Want?

?It begun to dawn on many conservatives that in spite of apparent electoral victories that have occurred regularly since the Reagan years, they have consistently lost, and lost overwhelmingly to progressive forces,? Patrick Deneen writes in a recent essay titled ?Abandoning Defensive Crouch Conservatism.? He goes on to argue that conservatives need to reject liberal values like free speech, religious liberty and pluralism, abandon their defensive posturing and use the power of the state to actively fight back against what he calls ?liberal totalitarianism.?

To progressive ears, these kinds of statements can be baffling; after all, Republicans currently control a majority of state legislatures, governorships and the Supreme Court, and they are poised to make gains in the midterm elections this fall. But even so, there?s a pervasive feeling among conservatives that progressives are using their unprecedented institutional power ? in universities, in Hollywood, in the mainstream media, in the C-suites of tech companies ? to wage war on traditional ways of life. And many of them have come to believe that the only viable response is to fight back against these advances at all costs. It?s impossible to understand the policies, leaders, rhetoric and tactics of the populist right without first trying to inhabit this worldview.

That is why, for this second conversation in our series ?The Rising Right,? I wanted to speak with Deneen. He is a professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, and his 2018 book, ?Why Liberalism Failed,? has become a touchstone within the conservative intelligentsia and was even fairly well received by liberals. But since then, Deneen?s writing has come to express something closer to total political war. And with three other professors, he recently started a Substack newsletter, ?The Postliberal Order,? to build the kind of intellectual and political project needed to fight that war.

This is a conversation about what Deneen?s ?postliberal? political project looks like ? and the tensions and contradictions it reveals about the modern populist right. We discuss (and debate) Deneen?s view that conservatives keep losing, why he believes the left is hostile to the family, whether America needs stricter divorce laws, what the post-liberal right would actually do with power, the virtues and vices of policy analysis, whether post-liberals have built their core arguments around an invented straw man liberalism, Joe Biden?s agenda for families and much more.

Mentioned:

?A Good That Is Common? by Patrick Deneen

?Replace the Elite? by Patrick Deneen

?Abandoning Defensive Crouch Conservatism? by Patrick Deneen

Book recommendations:

The New Class War by Michael Lind

Dominion by Tom Holland

The Art of Loading Brush by Wendell Berry

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris and Rollin Hu; original music by Isaac Jones and Jeff Geld; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-05-13
Länk till avsnitt

Sway: 'Fear and Panic Are Bedfellows' in Ukraine

Today we're bringing you an episode from our friends at Sway about the war in Ukraine and the challenges of conflict-zone reporting. 

Clarissa Ward has had, as she puts it, a ?long and very complicated relationship? with Russia. The chief international correspondent for CNN, she has had stints in Moscow since the beginning of her career, and has struggled to get a Russian visa since she investigated the 2020 poisoning of the Russian opposition leader Aleksei Navalny.

But that hasn?t stopped her from reporting on the region, and in particular on Russia?s invasion of Ukraine. Yet after months of war, it can be an uphill battle to keep the viewers? attention on the front line. ?Our job is to keep finding ways to make sure that we don?t become numb and desensitized to the horrors of war, because that is exactly how wars continue and grind on,? Ward says.

In this conversation, taped last week, Kara talks to Ward about her time reporting in Ukraine, what it?s like to ?let fear sit in the passenger seat? when reporting from the front and how the hangover of war can leave correspondents detached from the ?bourgeois and banal? normalcy of home.

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-05-10
Länk till avsnitt

Donald Trump Didn?t Hijack the G.O.P. He Understood It.

Right now, Republicans of all stripes ? Ron DeSantis, J.D. Vance, Mike Pence, Glenn Youngkin ? are trying to figure out how to channel the populist energies of Donald Trump into a winning political message. The struggle to achieve such a synthesis is the defining project on the American right today. Its outcome will determine the future of the Republican Party ? and American politics.

To understand what the post-Trump future of the G.O.P. will look like, it helps to have a clearer understanding of the party?s past ? particularly the chapters that many conservatives prefer to forget. Traditional histories of American conservatism view Donald Trump?s election as an aberration in the lineage of the American right ? an unprecedented populist rejection of the conservatism of Ronald Reagan and William F. Buckley Jr.

But Matthew Continetti?s new book ?The Right: The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism? flips that conventional history on its head. In Continetti?s view, the ?populist? energies that Trump harnessed in 2016 aren?t anything new for the American right ? they have always been central to it. The American right has always been defined by a back-and-forth struggle ? and at times a synthesis ? between its populist grass roots and its elites.

I wanted to bring Continetti on the show because this history is crucial to understanding where the Republican Party could go next. And also because this is the first episode in a new series we are producing called ?The Rising Right.? Over the next few weeks, ?The Ezra Klein Show? will feature conversations with conservative writers, scholars and thinkers who are trying to harness the forces that Trump unleashed and build a superstructure of ideas, institutions and policy around them. But to see where that movement is going, you have to take seriously where it came from.

Mentioned:
?Can Reaganism Rise Again?? by Ross Douthat

Book Recommendations:
Let Us Talk of Many Things by William F. Buckley Jr.
Making It by Norman Podhoretz
The Prince of Darkness by Robert D. Novak

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Mary Marge Locker and Jenny Casas; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-05-06
Länk till avsnitt

The Argument: Why the G.O.P. Can't Stop Saying 'Gay'

Today we're bringing you an episode from our friends at The Argument about Florida's ?Don't Say Gay? bill and the broader wave of anti-L.G.B.T.Q. legislation, spurred by the political right, that is spreading across the country. According to the Human Rights Campaign, this year alone, more than 300 anti-L.G.B.T.Q. bills have been introduced in state legislatures. 

Why has this issue become a major focus of the Republican Party? And how is the way society treats individuals who identify as L.G.B.T.Q. changing? Jane Coaston speaks to her Times Opinion colleagues Ross Douthat and Michelle Goldberg about these questions and brings a deeply personal perspective to the table.

Mentioned:

?How to Make Sense of the New L.G.B.T.Q. Culture War? by Ross Douthat in The New York Times

?Gender Unicorn? from Trans Student Educational Resources

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-05-03
Länk till avsnitt

Elon Musk Might Break Twitter. Maybe That's a Good Thing.

If Elon Musk?s bid to purchase Twitter comes to fruition, the world?s richest person will own one of its most important communications platforms. Twitter might have a smaller user base than Facebook, Instagram and even Snapchat, but it shapes the dominant narratives in key industries like politics, media, finance and technology more than any other platform. Attention ? particularly that of elite leaders in these industries ? is a valuable resource, one that Twitter manages and trades in.

Musk understands Twitter?s attention economy better than anyone. On numerous occasions, his tweets have sent a company?s stock or a cryptocurrency?s value skyrocketing (or plummeting). So what would it mean for Musk to own Twitter? How would that change the platform? How might he use Twitter to change, well, everything else?

Felix Salmon is the chief economics correspondent at Axios, a co-host of the Slate Money podcast and someone who has spent a lot of time thinking about the economics of attention, the way modern financial markets work and how money impacts the technologies we use. We discuss Musk?s possible motivations for owning Twitter, how Musk?s distinct brand of tweeting has reaped financial windfalls, what Musk understands about finance and attention that many others don?t, why Twitter is so powerful as a storytelling machine, why journalists are turning away from it, what a decentralized Twitter might look like, how Web3 resembles the 1960s ?back to the land? movement, how Musk could break Twitter ? but why that might end up saving Twitter ? and more.

Mentioned:

?Elon Musk Got Twitter Because He Gets Twitter? by Ezra Klein

"A Crypto Optimist Meets a Crypto Skeptic? on The Ezra Klein Show

?A Viral Case Against Crypto, Explored? on The Ezra Klein Show

?The Way the Senate Melted Down Over Crypto Is Very Revealing? by Ezra Klein

Book Recommendations:

The Bond King by Mary Childs

Typeset in the Future by Dave Addey

The Surprise of Cremona by Edith Templeton

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Jenny Casas, Michelle Harris, Rollin Hu and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones and Carole Sabouraud; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-04-29
Länk till avsnitt

Putin May Not Like How He?s Changed Europe

Vladimir Putin?s invasion of Ukraine has transformed Europe within a matter of weeks. A continent once fractured by the refugee crisis is now taking in millions of refugees. Countries such as Germany have made considerable pledges to increase military spending. The European Union said it would cut off Russian oil and gas ?well before 2030? ? a once unthinkable prospect. The European project seems more confident in itself than at any other time in recent history.

But some European countries are also seeing trends in the opposite direction. This month in Hungary, Prime Minister Viktor Orban?s nationalist government won re-election easily. The far-right leader Marine Le Pen lost this past weekend?s French presidential election to the incumbent, Emmanuel Macron, but secured a significant 41.5 percent of the vote, up from 33.9 percent in 2017. And nationalist movements ? Brexit in Britain, the Five Star Movement in Italy and others ? have become potent political forces in recent years.

So what?s next for Europe? Will Putin?s invasion reinvigorate the collective European project? Or will the continent revert to its preinvasion path of fracture, division and nationalism?

Ivan Krastev is the chairman of the Center for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, Bulgaria and the author of numerous books, including ?After Europe? and, with Stephen Holmes, ?The Light That Failed: Why the West Is Losing the Fight for Democracy.? He?s also one of my favorite people to talk to on the subject of Europe, liberalism, democracy and the tensions therein.

We discuss how European identity went from revolving around war to being centered on economic trade, why Europe has treated the Ukrainian refugee crisis so differently from previous refugee crises, how the West?s overly economic understanding of human motivation blinded it to Putin?s plans, what the relative success of politicians like Le Pen and Orban means for the future of Europe, how fears of demographic change can help explain phenomena as different as Putin?s invasion and Donald Trump?s election, whether Putin?s invasion can reawaken an exhausted European liberalism and much more.

Mentioned:

?The End of History?? by Francis Fukuyama

The End of History and the Last Man by Francis Fukuyama

?We Are All Living in Vladimir Putin?s World Now? by Ivan Krastev

?The Crisis of American Power: How Europeans See Biden?s America? by Ivan Krastev

?The Power of the Past: How Nostalgia Shapes European Public Opinion? by Catherine E. de Vries and Isabell Hoffmann from Bertelsmann Stiftung

Book Recommendations:

Free by Lea Ypi

The Age of Unpeace by Mark Leonard

Time Shelter by Georgi Gospodinov

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-04-26
Länk till avsnitt

Emily St. John Mandel on Time Travel, Parenting and the Apocalypse

?Station Eleven? by Emily St. John Mandel was published in 2014. That book imagined the world after a pandemic had wiped out, well, almost everyone. It?s a gorgeous novel with a particular emotional power: it helps you grieve a life you still have. But then came a real pandemic, not as lethal as the one Mandel imagined, but a shock nonetheless. And ?Station Eleven? ? already a beloved international best seller ? found a second life. Mandel became known as a pandemic prophet. ?Station Eleven? became an acclaimed HBO Max series.

?Sea of Tranquility? by Mandel is written from within the hothouse of that strange kind of celebrity. The author put a version of herself in there, struggling with fame and parenthood and quarantine and too much travel. But there are also moon colonies, and time travel, and hints that we live in a computer simulation. If ?Station Eleven? explores how calamity could change the world, ?Sea of Tranquility? wonders what happens if it doesn?t.

This conversation begins in the weirdness of the simulation hypothesis, but winds its way to much more fundamental questions of being human right now. There is so much we could lose, so much we already have lost; why is it so hard to live with the gratitude our lives should inspire, or the seriousness the moment demands?

Mentioned:

?The Power of Patience? by Jennifer L. Roberts

This Time Tomorrow by Emma Straub

?Are We Living in a Computer Simulation?? by Nick Bostrom

Book recommendations:

Scary Monsters by Michelle de Kretser

Ill Will by Dan Chaon

Suite Française by Irène Némirovsky

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-04-22
Länk till avsnitt

Can Democrats Turn Their 2022 Around?

With the midterms just over six months away, the electoral prospects for Democrats are looking bleak. President Biden?s approval rating is at 42 percent, around where Donald Trump?s was at this point in his presidency. Recent polls asking whether Americans want Republicans or Democrats in Congress found that Republicans are leading by about 2 percentage points. And with inflation spiking to its highest point in decades, Covid cases rising and Russia?s invasion of Ukraine continuing to send economic and humanitarian shock waves across the globe, things don?t look as if they are going to get better anytime soon.

What will it take for Democrats to turn things around? What fights should they be picking with Republicans, and how should they be making the case that they deserve another chance at leading the country?

Sean McElwee is a co-founder and the executive director of Data for Progress, a research organization that gathers polling data to strategize on behalf of progressive causes and policies. Anat Shenker-Osorio is a principal at ASO Communications, a political communications firm that conducts analytic and empirical research to help progressive political campaigns. She also hosts the ?Words to Win By? podcast. McElwee and Shenker-Osorio have deeply influenced my thinking on how words work in American politics: how campaigns can meaningfully address what voters want and how they can persuade swing voters and motivate the party?s base.

In this conversation, McElwee and Shenker-Osorio help me understand where Democrats stand with the electorate and what, if anything, they can do to improve their chances in 2022. We discuss why Biden?s approval rating is so low, given the popularity of his policies, why governing parties so often lose midterm elections, whether Democrats should focus more on persuading swing voters or on mobilizing their base, why it?s important for Democrats to get their base to sing from the same songbook, what Democrats can learn from Trump about winning voters? attention, how Republicans are running politics on easy mode, whether it was wise politically for Biden to double down on the message to fund the police, what political fights Democrats should pick in the lead-up to the midterms, how the party should handle spiking inflation and more.

Mentioned:

"Democrats, Here's How to Lose in 2022. And Deserve It." by Ezra Klein

Book recommendations:

Anat Shenker-Osorio

A Theory of System Justification by John T. Jost

Memorial by Bryan Washington

These Precious Days by Ann Patchett

Sean McElwee

The Course by Ed Miller

The Precipice by Toby Ord

The Climate War by Eric Pooley

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-04-19
Länk till avsnitt

Best Of: This Conversation Will Change How You Think About Trauma

?Trauma is much more than a story about something that happened long ago,? writes Dr. Bessel van der Kolk. ?The emotions and physical sensations that were imprinted during the trauma are experienced not as memories but as disruptive physical reactions in the present.?

Van der Kolk, a psychiatrist by training, has been a pioneer in trauma research for decades now and leads the Trauma Research Foundation. His 2014 book ?The Body Keeps the Score,? quickly became a touchstone on the topic. And although the book was first released over seven years ago, it now sits at No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list, a testament to the state of our national psyche.

The core argument of the book is that traumatic experiences ? everything from sexual assault and incest to emotional and physical abuse ? become embedded in the older, more primal parts of our brain that don?t have access to conscious awareness. And that means two things simultaneously. First, that trauma lodges in the body. We carry a physical imprint of our psychic wounds. The body keeps the score. But ? and I found this more revelatory ? the mind hides the score. It obscures the memories, or convinces us our victimization was our fault, or covers the event in shame so we don?t discuss it.

There?s a lot in this conversation. We discuss the lived experience of trauma, the relationship between the mind and the body, the differences between our ?experiencing? and ?autobiographical? selves, why van der Kolk believes human language is both a ?miracle? and a ?tyranny,? unconventional treatments for trauma from E.M.D.R. and yoga to psychedelics and theater, how societies can manage collective trauma like 9/11 and Covid-19, the shortcomings of America?s ?post-alcoholic? approach to dealing with psychic suffering, how to navigate the often complex relationships with the traumatized people we know and love, and much more.

Mentioned: 

?The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study? by Vince Felitti et al.

Study on efficacy of EMDR

?REBUS and the Anarchic Brain: Toward a Unified Model of the Brain Action of Psychedelics? by Robin Carhart-Harris et al. 

Book Recommendations:

The Apology by V 

Love in Goon Park by Deborah Blum

The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan 

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein.

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing and engineering by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski

2022-04-15
Länk till avsnitt

A Ukrainian Philosopher on What Putin Never Understood About Ukraine

Russia?s invasion of Ukraine is only getting more brutal: We?ve seen the bodies of civilians strewn in the streets in Bucha, the city of Mariupol almost leveled and, just a few days ago, a Russian missile attack on a crowded train station in Kramatorsk killing at least 50 people. The United Nations has confirmed 1,793 civilian deaths in Ukraine, though the actual number is thought to be far higher.

Russia?s viciousness in this campaign makes Ukraine?s resilience all the more remarkable. Ukrainians have defied expectations in staving off Russia?s far larger army and holding cities like Kyiv that some believed might fall within days of an invasion. Much of the commentary in recent weeks has revolved around what this war has revealed about Russia: its myths, its military, its leadership, its threat. What?s no less important, though, is what this war has revealed about Ukraine.

Ukrainians have modeled a deep commitment to self-determination and shown how far they would go to protect it. The Ukrainian philosopher and editor Volodymyr Yermolenko has written that ?freedom is the key trait of Ukraine?s identity as a political nation,? and Ukraine?s resistance testifies to how deep that trait runs.

Yermolenko is a philosopher, the editor in chief of UkraineWorld and the editor of the essay collection ?Ukraine in Histories and Stories.? I invited Yermolenko onto the show to help me understand how Ukraine has defined itself in relation to the political behemoths to its east and west: Russia and Europe. Our conversation also explores what it has felt like to be in Kyiv as Russian troops have shelled the city, how definitions of time and home change during war, what has ? and hasn?t ? surprised Yermolenko about the Ukrainian resistance, what people in the West may not understand about the cultural differences between Ukraine and Russia, why Ukraine?s political structure makes it so difficult to conquer, how Ukraine is reminding the West why its republican and humanistic values matter, what Yermolenko would say to President Biden if he could and more.

Mentioned:

?Volodymyr Yermolenko, a Ukrainian philosopher, considers his national identity? by Volodymyr Yermolenko

?Dreams of Europe? by Volodymyr Yermolenko

Book Recommendations:

?Ukraine in Histories and Stories? by Volodymyr Yermolenko

?The Gates of Europe? by Serhii Plokhy

?Lost Kingdom? by Serhii Plokhy

?Chernobyl? by Serhii Plokhy

?Blood of Others? by Rory Finnin

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Kate Sinclair and Mary Marge Locker; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-04-12
Länk till avsnitt

Fiona Hill on Whether Ukraine Can Win ? and What Happens if Russia Loses

The Russia-Ukraine war has changed considerably in recent weeks. Vladimir Putin is no longer talking explicitly about regime change in Ukraine. The Russian military has shifted its focus away from taking Kyiv and toward making territorial gains in Ukraine?s east. The prospect of an outright Ukrainian victory is no longer out of the question. And negotiations between the parties over a possible settlement appear to be making some progress.

There?s been a darker turn as well: Over the weekend, images surfaced of atrocities committed by the Russian military against Ukrainian civilians. And Western leaders are considering expanding military aid to Ukraine, initiating war crimes investigations and placing harsher sanctions on Russia in response.

Fiona Hill served as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian affairs on the National Security Council under Donald Trump and as a national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia under Barack Obama and George W. Bush. I had her on the show a few weeks ago to help me make sense of the Russia-Ukraine conflict as it was developing at the time, and it was one of the most illuminating perspectives I?d heard on the topic. So I invited her back to discuss how the situation has changed, where we are now and what the conflict could look like.

We discuss why Hill has become pessimistic about the possibility of a peace deal, how the carnage in Bucha could alter the course of the conflict, why Russia has been so much weaker on the battlefield than expected, whether Ukraine can achieve an outright victory, why this war is making Putin more popular in Russia (not less), what else the West could be doing to support Ukraine, why Hill thinks we?re entering a ?much darker? phase of the conflict, what role China could play in bringing about a negotiated settlement, what a renewed framework for European security could look like and more.

Book Recommendations:

The Art of War by Sun Tzu

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Kate Sinclair and Mary Marge Locker; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-04-08
Länk till avsnitt

The Most Thorough Case Against Crypto I've Heard

The hype around cryptocurrencies has reached a fever pitch. There are Super Bowl ads for crypto companies featuring celebrities like Matt Damon and Larry David. The Staples Center in Los Angeles is now the Crypto.com Arena. And behind that hype is a distinct vision: a more decentralized economy where individuals have more autonomy over their finances, a grass-roots internet free of the not-so-invisible hand of Big Tech, and a cultural ecosystem where artists and musicians can fairly monetize their work.

But what if that vision is deeply flawed? What if the technology undergirding cryptocurrencies isn?t what it?s cracked up to be? Or what if the technology does work, yet the world it creates isn?t a decentralized utopia but a hyper-financialized dystopia?

Dan Olson is the creator of a two-hour-YouTube video, ?Line Goes Up,? that has now been viewed nearly seven million times. ?Line Goes Up? is the single most comprehensive critique of crypto that I?ve ever heard. And that?s because Olson isn?t just focused on cryptocurrencies as a technology or an asset class, but on the crypto universe as a distinct culture underpinned by a powerful ideology. It?s easy to think about the lingo, the acronyms and the myths associated with the crypto world as incidental to the value of cryptocurrencies and NFTs as assets. But for Olson, the culture and the currency are inextricably linked. And once you?ve made that connection, suddenly a lot of the problems, warning signs and potential dangers of crypto become visible in a new way.

Mentioned:

?A Crypto Optimist Meets a Crypto Skeptic? from ?The Ezra Klein Show?

?How NFTs Create Value? by Steve Kaczynski and Scott Duke Kominers

You Are Not a Gadget by Jaron Lanier

?Web3 Is Going Just Great? by Molly White

The Gift by Lewis Hyde

Book recommendations:

The Power Broker by Robert A. Caro

The Tombs of Atuan by Ursula K. Le Guin

Persuasive Games by Ian Bogost

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Mary Marge Locker and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld and Isaac Jones; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-04-05
Länk till avsnitt

Sanctioning Russia Is a Form of War. We Need to Treat It Like One.

The Russian political scientist Ilya Matveev recently described the impact of the West?s sanctions on his country as ?30 years of economic development thrown into the bin.? He?s not exaggerating. Economists expect the Russian economy to contract by at least 15 percent of G.D.P. this year. Inflation is spiking. An exodus of Russian professionals is underway. Stories of shortages and long lines for basic consumer goods abound.

The U.S. and its allies have turned to sanctions as a way of taking action against Russia?s atrocities without direct military intervention. But to describe these sanctions as anything short of all-out economic warfare is euphemistic. Measures like these might be cloaked in the technocratic language of finance and economics, but the immiseration they cause is anything but abstract.

Nicholas Mulder is a historian at Cornell University and the author of the terrifyingly relevant new book ?The Economic Weapon: The Rise of Sanctions as a Tool of Modern War.? In it, Mulder focuses on the last time economic warfare was waged at the scale we?re witnessing today, the period between World War I and World War II. And the book?s central lesson is this: We ultimately don?t know what?s going to happen when sanctions of this magnitude collide with the ideologies, myths and political dynamics of a given country. They could persuade the targeted country to back down. But they could also make it so desperate that it becomes more aggressive or lashes out ? as Germany and Japan did on the eve of World War II.

So this is a discussion about what kind of weapon sanctions are, whether they actually achieve their goals and how they might shape the future of the Russia-Ukraine conflict ? and the world. We also explore how sanctions ?weaponize inflation,? whether they could lead to Vladimir Putin?s downfall in Russia, the toll they have taken on the Russian economy, how the West can leverage its sanctions to help bring about an end to the war in Ukraine, whether a European energy embargo could backfire, how this economic war is destabilizing countries around the world, the humanitarian crisis U.S. sanctions are helping create in Afghanistan, and what a foreign policy that didn?t rely so heavily on sanctions could look like.

This episode is guest hosted by Rogé Karma, the staff editor for ?The Ezra Klein Show.? Rogé has been with the show since July 2019, when it was based at Vox. He works closely with Ezra on everything related to the show, from editing to interview prep to guest selection. At Vox, he also wrote articles and conducted interviews on topics ranging from policing and racial justice to democracy reform and the coronavirus.

Mentioned:

?The Inflation Weapon: How American Sanctions Harm Iranian Households? by Esfandyar Batmanghelidj 

?Iran, Sanctions and Inflation as a Weapon of Mass Destruction? by Spencer Ackerman 

Oligarchy by Jeffrey A. Winters

?If Joe Biden Doesn?t Change Course, This Will Be His Worst Failure? by Ezra Klein 

Book recommendations:

Collapse by Vladislav M. Zubok

The Perfect Fascist by Victoria de Grazia

My Century by Aleksander Wat

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Kate Sinclair and Mary Marge Locker; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-04-01
Länk till avsnitt

I Keep Hoping Larry Summers Is Wrong. What if He?s Not?

?There is a chance that macroeconomic stimulus on a scale closer to World War II levels than normal recession levels will set off inflationary pressures of a kind we have not seen in a generation,? wrote Larry Summers in February 2021. A year later, the debate still rages over the first part of that sentence ? the extent to which the American Rescue Plan is responsible for rising prices. But the rest of it is no longer in question: We?re currently experiencing the worst inflationary crisis in decades.

Annual inflation was already at its highest rate in decades in January of this year. But there was still a hopeful story you could tell about 2022: As the Covid pandemic eased, spending patterns would normalize, supply chains would strengthen, the labor market would stabilize, and inflation would ease. Then the Russian invasion of Ukraine sent global commodity markets into a tailspin and energy prices to record highs. An Omicron wave hit China, leading to huge lockdowns affecting global supply chains. And while the Fed has responded with the first of many planned interest rate hikes, it looks as though the inflation picture is only going to get worse in the immediate future.

For over a year now, Summers ? a former U.S. Treasury secretary and current Harvard economist ? has been warning about the economy that we appear to be entering. So I invited him to the show to make his case and paint a picture of what he thinks comes next. We discuss why he thinks we?re almost certainly headed toward a recession, why he believes the Fed is engaged in ?wishful and delusional thinking,? whether corporations are using this inflationary period as an excuse to goose profit margins, how to avoid a 1970s-style stagflation crisis, whether interest rates are the right tool to be addressing inflation in the first place, why he thinks much more immigration is one of the best tools we have to bring down prices in the long term and much more.

Mentioned:

Larry Summers?s Mar. 17 Op-Ed in The Washington Post

Book Recommendations:

The Best and The Brightest by David Halberstam

The Price of Peace by Zachary D. Carter

Slouching Towards Utopia by J. Bradford DeLong

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Andrea López-Cruzado; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-03-29
Länk till avsnitt

Margaret Atwood on Stories, Deception and the Bible

A good rule of thumb is that whatever Margaret Atwood is worried about now is likely what the rest of us will be worried about a decade from now. The rise of authoritarianism. A backlash against women?s social progress. The seductions and dangers of genetic engineering. Climate change leading to social unrest. Advertising culture permeating more and more of our lives. Atwood ? the author of the Booker Prize-winning novels ?The Blind Assassin? and ?The Testaments,? as well as ?The Handmaid?s Tale,? ?Oryx and Crake? and, most recently, the essay collection ?Burning Questions? ? was writing about these topics decades ago, forecasting the unsettling world that we inhabit now. Pick up any one of her 17 published novels, and you will likely come across a theme or a quality of the setting that rings eerily true in the present day.

This is especially true of Atwood?s magnum opus, ?The Handmaid?s Tale,? which takes place in a future America where climate change, droughts, a decaying economy and falling birthrates lead to the rise of a theocracy in which women called Handmaids are conscripted into childbirth. The repressive regime she created in that novel, Gilead, has been endlessly referred to and reinterpreted over the years because of the wisdom it contains about why people cooperate with ? and resist ? political movements that destroy the freedom of others. And as recent weeks have shown, we?re far from the day when that wisdom becomes irrelevant to present circumstances.

We discuss the deep human craving for stories, why Atwood believes we are engaged in ?an arm wrestle for the soul of America,? what makes the stories of the Bible so compelling, the dangerous allure of totalitarian movements, how the shift from coal to oil helped to fuel the rise of modern consumerism, why she thinks climate change will cause even more harm by increasing the likelihood of war than it will by increasing the likelihood of extreme weather, how our society lost its capacity to imagine new utopias, why progressives need to incorporate more fun into their politics, why we should ?keep our eye on the mushroom,? Atwood?s take on recent U.F.O. sightings and more. She even sings a bit of a song from the 1950s about the Iron Curtain.

Mentioned:

Art & Energy by Barry Lord

Book recommendations:

War by Margaret MacMillan

Biased by Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Secrets of the Sprakkar by Eliza Reid

Charlotte?s Web by E. B. White

Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Kate Sinclair and Mary Marge Locker; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin, Kristina Samulewski, Coral Ann Howells and Brooks Bouson.

2022-03-25
Länk till avsnitt

How Energy Markets Are Shaping Putin?s Invasion ? and the World

Nearly every dimension of the Ukraine-Russia conflict has been shaped by energy markets.

Russia?s oil and gas exports have long been the foundation of its economy and geopolitical strength. Vladimir Putin?s decision to invade Ukraine ? like his annexation of Crimea in 2014 ? coincided with high energy prices. While Western sanctions have dealt a major blow to Russia?s financial system, European carve-outs for Russian oil and gas have kept hundreds of millions of dollars flowing to Moscow every day.

As a result, energy policy has become foreign policy. European countries are doubling down on their commitments to decarbonize in order to reduce their dependence on Russian energy as quickly as possible. The United States has banned Russian oil and gas imports, and in the wake of spiking gasoline prices, the Biden administration is looking for any opportunity to increase the world?s oil supply, including the possibility of normalizing trade relations with previously blacklisted countries like Venezuela and Iran.

But the intersection of energy and geopolitics extends far beyond this conflict. Energy is the bedrock of nations? economic prosperity, military strength and geopolitical power. Which means energy markets are constantly shaping and reshaping global dynamics. You can?t understand the way the world operates today if you don?t understand the global flow of energy.

There are few people who have studied energy markets as closely as Daniel Yergin has. He is an economic historian and writer who has been called ?America?s most influential energy pundit? in The New York Times. And he?s the author of numerous books on the intersection of energy and geopolitics, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning ?The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, and Power? and, most recently, the best-selling ?The New Map: Energy, Climate, and the Clash of Nations.?

We discuss how Putin?s invasion halfway across the world caused gasoline prices to rise in California; what would happen to European economies if they decided to cut off Russian gas; how the U.S. shale revolution has transformed the global political landscape; why, when it comes to China and Russia, Yergin believes that ?a relationship that was once based on Marx and Lenin is now grounded in oil and gas?; whether Donald Trump was right to be skeptical of Nord Stream 2; why decarbonization is not only beneficial for the climate but also crucial for national security; whether the Biden administration?s response to spiking energy prices is putting its climate agenda in jeopardy; why Yergin thinks hydrogen power could become central to combating climate change; and much more.

Book recommendations:

Putin?s World by Angela Stent

The Power of Law by Sebastian Mallaby

The Cloud Revolution by Mark P. Mills

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Andrea López-Cruzado; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-03-22
Länk till avsnitt

A Realist Take on How the Russia-Ukraine War Could End

As we enter the fourth week of Russia?s invasion of Ukraine, many of the possible pathways this conflict could take are terrifying. A military quagmire that leads to protracted death and suffering. A Russian takeover of Kyiv and installation of a puppet government. An accidental strike on Polish or Romanian territory that draws America and the rest of NATO into war. Or, perhaps worst of all, a series of escalations that culminates in nuclear exchange.

But one possibility carries a glimmer of hope. This week, Ukrainian and Russian negotiators began talks on a tentative peace plan ? one that would involve Ukraine abandoning its attempts to join NATO and promising not to host foreign military bases or weaponry, in exchange for Western security guarantees and a Russian troop withdrawal. We?re still far from any kind of definitive settlement ? and there are legitimate concerns over whether Putin would accept any kind of deal at this point ? but it?s a start.

Emma Ashford is a senior fellow with the New American Engagement Initiative at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security, and a member of the school of foreign policy thinking known as ?realism.? Realists view international relations as a contest between states for power and security; they tend to focus less on the psychologies and ideologies of individual leaders and more on the strategic self-interest of the parties involved. It?s an imperfect framework but a useful one ? especially when it comes to analyzing what it would take to achieve a successful negotiation or settlement.

So I invited Ashford on the show to help me think through the different trajectories the conflict could take ? and what the West can do to make de-escalation more likely. We also discuss John Mearsheimer?s argument that the West?s effort to expand NATO bears responsibility for Putin?s invasion, why Ashford isn?t particularly worried about the possibility of Russian cyberattacks on the West, how Western sanctions blur the line between war and peace, whether NATO?s efforts to supply Ukraine with weapons might backfire, why sanctions might not hurt Russian elites as much as Western leaders hope and how this conflict is changing the geopolitical calculus of countries like Germany, China and India.

Book recommendations:

The Economic Weapon by Nicholas Mulder

Not One Inch by M.E. Sarotte

The Sleepwalkers by Christopher Clark

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Mary Marge Locker and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-03-18
Länk till avsnitt

Timothy Snyder on the Myths That Blinded the West to Putin?s Plans

?Americans and Europeans were guided through the new century by a tale about ?the end of history,? by what I will call the politics of inevitability, a sense that the future is just more of the present, that the laws of progress are known, that there are no alternatives, and therefore nothing really to be done,? writes the Yale historian Timothy Snyder in his 2018 book, ?The Road to Unfreedom.?

The central thesis of ?The Road to Unfreedom? is that different understandings of the past, its myths, histories and memories create radically different politics. Snyder wrote the book as a way of understanding Vladimir Putin?s 2014 invasion of Crimea and the West?s response, but its argument has become only more salient in recent weeks. You can?t understand Putin?s recent invasion of Ukraine without understanding his metaphysical attachment to the era of empire, his mythological telling of Russian-Ukrainian history, and his semi-mystical construction of what constitutes the Russian nation.

But Snyder?s more radical argument is that the West is also operating under its own mythological understanding of time ? one that is so deeply ingrained in our collective psyche that it masquerades as common sense. And that understanding the influence of the ?politics of inevitability? is essential to make sense of everything from the West?s misreading of Putin?s motivations to the internal fracturing of the European Union to the decline of liberal democracy across the globe.

So that?s where we start: with the central myths at the heart of the modern Western project ? and the blind spots they have created. But Snyder is also a renowned historian of European great-power conflict who has written six books entirely or partly about Ukraine. So we also discuss the chasm between the radicalness of European integration and the tedium of European governance, why Snyder thinks Putin?s invasion is fundamentally the product of a Russian identity crisis, Ukraine?s unique history as a battleground for a great-power war, how Ukrainian identity transcends ethnicity and language, why Western leaders and analysts consistently fail to decipher Putin?s intentions, the huge difference between a Russian nation premised on myth and a Ukrainian nation forged by collective action, how Ukrainian resistance could inspire a Western vision for the future and more.

Mentioned:

Bloodlands by Timothy Snyder

"On the History Unity of Russians and Ukrainians? by Vladimir Putin

Book recommendations:

Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible by Peter Pomerantsev

The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt

The Gates of Europe by Serhii Plokhy

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-03-15
Länk till avsnitt

Masha Gessen on Putin?s 'Profoundly Anti-Modern? Worldview

For Western audiences, the past few weeks have been a torrent of information about what?s happening in Russia and Ukraine. Daily updates of Russian military advances. Horrifying videos of buildings exploding and innocent civilians being killed. Announcements of increasingly severe economic sanctions and major corporate pullouts. Charts showing the collapse of the ruble. Story after story about the hardships facing the Russian economy.

Most Russians, however, are living in an alternate reality. This week, the Russian government made it a crime for journalists to spread what it considers false information about the ?special military operation? in Ukraine ? information that would include calling the war a war. As a result, many Western news organizations, including The Times, have pulled their employees out of Russia. The Kremlin has made it nearly impossible for people in Russia to access independent or international news sources. Russian state media coverage of the conflict has been, in the words of my guest today, ?bland and bloodless.?

That raises some important questions: What do ordinary Russians know about the war being waged by their government? How are they interpreting the collapse of their currency and impending financial crisis? What are they being told to believe? And is the propaganda machine working?

Masha Gessen is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of many books on Russian history, politics and culture, including ?The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin? and the National Book Award-winning ?The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia.? And, perhaps most important, Gessen has been on the ground in Russia in recent weeks trying to understand how ordinary Russians are seeing and interpreting the world around them.

This is a conversation that starts in Moscow, as Gessen describes what it was like to be there during the first days of the invasion. We talk about the eerie sense of normalcy in the city as the ruble crashed and the odd sense of calm in Pushkin Square as policemen in combat gear dragged protesters into a police bus. We then take a wider view on how Russians responded to economic sanctions in the past, how totalitarian societies make it impossible for people to form opinions, where Putin sees himself in a lineage of ?brutal, expansionist dictators? like Ivan the Terrible and Joseph Stalin, why Putin governs Russia as if it were a 19th-century empire, what we learn when we listen closely to Putin?s speeches and how this latest act of aggression is likely to play out.

Disclaimer: This episode contains explicit language.

Mentioned:

The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt

?How Putin Wants Russians to See the War in Ukraine? by Masha Gessen in The New Yorker

The Future Is History by Masha Gessen

First Person by Vladimir Putin, Nataliya Gevorkyan, Natalya Timakova, and Andrei Kolesnikov

Book recommendations:

The Last Empire by Serhii Plokhy

Manual for Survival by Kate Brown

Babi Yar by Anatoly Kuznetsov

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Mary Marge Locker and Kate Sinclair; original music and mixing by Isaac Jones; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin, Kristina Samulewski and Joanna Szostek.

2022-03-11
Länk till avsnitt

Fiona Hill on the War Putin Is Really Fighting

Vladimir Putin was looking for a swift invasion that would halt Ukraine?s drift toward the West, reveal NATO?s fractures and weaknesses and solidify Russia as a global power. In response, the West threatened moderate sanctions, but ultimately showed little interest in stepping between Russia and Ukraine.

Then came the war, and everything changed. Russia?s invasion met with valiant Ukrainian resistance. President Volodymyr Zelensky became an international hero. NATO countries unified behind a truly punishing sanctions regime and significant military support. Russia?s attack strengthened Ukraine?s national identity ? and its desire to join the European Union. A conflict that the U.S. and Europe were treating as purely strategic is now a conflict about the West?s most fundamental values.

Much of this has felt hopeful, even inspiring, to those watching from the comfort of home. But it has the potential to unleash a truly terrifying spiral of escalation. Putin, feeling backed into a corner, has raised the stakes. Last week, he called the West?s sanctions akin to an act of war and has put Russia?s nuclear arsenal on alert. And the global wave of support for Ukraine has made it increasingly difficult for Western leaders to de-escalate. In the fog of war, it isn?t hard to imagine an accident or miscommunication that triggers a World War III-like scenario.

So what does a settlement here look like? What does Putin want? What would Zelensky accept? What will Europe and the U.S. sign onto? Is there any deal that could work for all the players?

There are few people better positioned to answer those questions than Fiona Hill. Hill is a senior fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution. She served as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian affairs on the National Security Council under Donald Trump and as a national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasian affairs under Barack Obama and George W. Bush. And she is the co-author of the influential Putin biography ?Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin.?

We discuss how Putin?s motivations and ambitions have changed dramatically in the last decade, why Ukrainian identity is absolutely central to understanding this conflict, whether NATO expansionism is responsible for the current conflict, the different pathways the war could take, how political incentives have created a spiral of escalation for Russia, Ukraine and the West, whether the economic pain of the sanctions can incentivize regime change in Moscow, the possibility of China playing a mediating role in resolving the conflict, the dangers of backing Putin into a corner, whether Putin is willing to use nuclear weapons, what de-escalation could look like at this point, and much more.

Book recommendations: 

Bloodlands by Timothy Snyder

Not One Inch by M.E. Sarotte

The Limits of Partnership by Angela Stent

Putin?s World by Angela Stent

Russia Under the Old Regime by Richard Pipes

The Formation of the Soviet Union by Richard Pipes

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-03-08
Länk till avsnitt

Fareed Zakaria Has a Better Way to Handle Russia ? and China

?Russia?s utterly unprovoked, unjustifiable, immoral invasion of Ukraine would seem to mark the end of an era,? writes Fareed Zakaria, ?one that began with the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.?

Many of us, myself included, grew up in that era. We came of age in a unipolar world, dominated by a single country whose military, economic, even cultural, hegemony remained largely uncontested. That world was by no means free of violence. But the great power conflict that had defined the lived experiences of previous generations seemed like an ancient relic.

Recently, it?s the post-Cold War era of the last 30 years that has begun to feel outdated. China has become an economic and military powerhouse ? its economy is now larger than the third, fourth, fifth and sixth biggest world economies combined. Russia has become geopolitically assertive, annexing Crimea in 2014, undermining U.S. elections , and now invading Ukraine.

Over the past few weeks, questions that once came off as alarmist have become urgent: Are we witnessing the return of great power conflict? And if so, what does that mean for America ? and the rest of the world?

Fareed Zakaria is the host of CNN?s ?Fareed Zakaria GPS,? a columnist for The Washington Post and one of the most brilliant analysts of this emerging era. His 2003 book ?The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad? and his 2008 book ?The Post American World? were well ahead of their times. And his more recent work on Russia?s aggression, China?s rise and the crucial distinctions between those nations is crucial for understanding this moment.

We discuss the decline of the so-called ?Pax-Americana,? why Zakaria believes Russia poses a much more existential threat to the liberal world order than China, what the West would be doing if it wanted to seriously punish Russia for its actions, whether Putin?s attempt to break the liberal world order has actually reinvigorated it, why Zakaria thinks it?s a mistake to think of the world as divided into ?democratic? and ?neo-authoritarian? blocs, how America?s expansionism and hypocrisy undermines its reputation abroad, whether Donald Trump was ultimately right about the need for greater European defense spending, what a diplomatic solution to the current Russia-Ukraine war could look like, how America?s thinking about the world needs to radically change in a global great power competition and more. Disclaimer: this episode contains explicit language. 

Mentioned:

?The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World? by Oona A. Hathaway and Scott J. Shapiro

Fareed Zakaria GPS episode, ?Fareed?s take: Putin?s War on Liberal Democracy.? (CNN)

?The Return to Great-Power Rivalry Was Inevitable? by Thomas Wright (The Atlantic)

?Why Ukrainians Believe They Can Win? by Michelle Goldberg in The New York Times.

Book recommendations:

Man, the State, and War: A Theoretical Analysis by Kenneth N. Waltz

A World Safe for Democracy by G. John Ikenberry

Memoirs 1925-1950 by George F. Kennan

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-03-04
Länk till avsnitt

Can the West Stop Russia by Strangling its Economy?

There?s the Russia-Ukraine war that?s easy to follow in the news right now. We can watch Russian bombs falling on Ukraine, see Russian tanks smoking on the side of the road, hear from Ukrainian resistance fighters livestreaming their desperate defense.

But there?s another theater to this war that?s harder to see, but may well decide the outcome: the economic war that West is waging on Russia. Europe and the United States initially responded with a limited set of sanctions but then expanded them into a counterattack capable of crushing the Russian economy. Vladimir Putin, for one, understands the danger: As the force of the West?s measures multiplied, he readied his nuclear forces in a bid to warn Europe and the United States off. This is terrifying territory.

So I asked Adam Tooze ? a brilliant economic historian, the director of the European Institute at Columbia, and the author of the indispensable ?Chartbook? newsletter ? to explain how the war in the financial markets is shaping the war in streets of Ukraine. What he gave me was a whole new way to see how Putin had readied his country for conflict, the leverage that Russia?s energy exports gave it, how the dreams of the globalizers had cracked, and what the West both was and wasn?t doing in response.

But this is two conversations, not one. On Friday, Tooze and I recorded just as the war began. That was a conversation about the economics of the war as both Russia and the West understood it when the bombing began. But on Monday, we spoke again, because so much had changed. Rather than splice the two discussions into an artificial omniscience, I?ve linked them, because I think they reveal more in sequence: They show how fast this war is reshaping the politics around it, how quickly the escalation is coming, how rapidly the plans are crumbling.

So we discuss the sanctions that the West has deployed against Russia, how Europe?s dependence on Russian energy exports undermined the West?s response, what Putin understood about the dark side of economic interdependence, how Ukraine?s remarkable resistance ? and the remarkable leadership of its president, Volodymyr Zelensky ? reshaped the politics and policies in the West, how this war could alter the geopolitical calculus of China and Taiwan, the new economic order that is emerging, and more.

Mentioned:

?Putin?s Challenge to Western hegemony - the 2022 edition? by Adam Tooze (Chartbook)

?The economic consequences of the war in Ukraine? (The Economist)

Book Recommendations:

The Economic Weapon by Nicholas Mulder

The End of the End of History by Alex Hochuli, George Hoare and Philip Cunliffe

The Future of Money by Eswar S. Prasad

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-03-01
Länk till avsnitt

A Philosophy of Games That Is Really a Philosophy of Life

When we play Monopoly or basketball, we know we are playing a game. The stakes are low. The rules are silly. The point system is arbitrary. But what if life is full of games ? ones with much higher stakes ? that we don?t even realize we?re playing?

According to the philosopher C. Thi Nguyen, games and gamified systems are everywhere in modern life. Social media applies the lure of a points-based scoring system to the complex act of communication. Fitness apps convert the joy and beauty of physical motion into a set of statistics you can monitor. The grades you received in school flatten the qualitative richness of education into a numerical competition. If you?ve ever consulted the U.S. News & World Report college rankings database, you?ve witnessed the leaderboard approach to university admissions.

In Nguyen?s book, ?Games: Agency as Art,? a core insight is that we?re not simply playing these games ? they are playing us, too. Our desires, motivations and behaviors are constantly being shaped and reshaped by incentives and systems that we aren?t even aware of. Whether on the internet or in the vast bureaucracies that structure our lives, we find ourselves stuck playing games over and over again that we may not even want to win ? and that we aren?t able to easily walk away from.

This is one of those conversations that offers a new and surprising lens for understanding the world. We discuss the unique magic of activities like rock climbing and playing board games, how Twitter?s system of likes and retweets is polluting modern politics, why governments and bureaucracies love tidy packets of information, how echo chambers like QAnon bring comfort to their ?players,? how to make sure we don?t get stuck in a game without realizing it, why we should be a little suspicious of things that give us pleasure and how to safeguard our own values in a world that wants us to care about winning the most points.

Mentioned:

How Twitter Gamifies Communication by C. Thi Nguyen

Trust in Numbers by Theodore M. Porter

Seeing Like a State by James C. Scott

?Against Rotten Tomatoes? by Matt Strohl

?A Game Designer?s Analysis Of QAnon? by Reed Berkowitz

The Great Endarkenment by Elijah Millgram

Game recommendations:

Modern Art

Root

The Quiet Year

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-02-25
Länk till avsnitt

Best Of: Stop. Breathe. We Can?t Keep Working Like This.

We were promised, with the internet, a productivity revolution. We were told that we?d get more done, in less time, with less stress. Instead, we got always-on communication, the dissolution of the boundaries between work and home, the feeling of constantly being behind, lackluster productivity numbers, and, to be fair, reaction GIFs. What went wrong?

Cal Newport is a computer scientist at Georgetown and the author of books trying to figure that out. At the center of his work is the idea that the technologies billed as offering us more productive, happier, socially rich lives have left us more exhausted, empty and stressed out than ever. He?s doing something not enough people do: questioning whether this was all worth it.

My critique of Newport?s work has always been that it focuses too much on the individual: Telling someone whose workplace communicates exclusively via Slack and email to be a ?digital minimalist? is like telling someone who lives in a candy store to diet. But his 2021 book, ?A World Without Email,? is all about systems ? specifically, the systems that govern how we work. In it, Newport makes a radical argument: We are living through a massive, rolling failure of markets and firms to rethink work for the digital age. But that can change. We can change it.

This conversation with Newport was originally recorded in March of 2021, but it's just as relevant today as ever.

Recommendations: 

"Technics and Civilization" by Lewis Mumford

"Five Things We Need to Know About Technological Change" by Neil Postman

?A Continuous Shape? (video)

"Andrew Henry's Meadow" by Doris Burn

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-02-22
Länk till avsnitt

A Critique of Government That Liberals Need to Hear

Government is a bureaucratic, slow-moving institution. It?s too easily captured by special interests. It?s often incapable of acting at the speed and scale our problems demand. And when it does act, it can make things worse. Look no further than the Food and Drug Administration?s slowness to approve rapid coronavirus tests or major cities? inability to build new housing and public transit or Congress?s failure to pass basic voting rights legislation.

This criticism is typically weaponized as an argument for shrinking government and outsourcing its responsibilities to the market. But the past two years have revealed the hollowness of that approach. A pandemic is a problem the private sector simply cannot solve. The same is true for other major challenges of the 21st century, such as climate change and technology-driven inequality. Ours is an age in which government needs to be able to do big things, solve big problems and deliver where the market cannot or will not.

Alex Tabarrok is an economist at George Mason University, a blogger at Marginal Revolution and for years has been one of the sharpest libertarian critics of big government. But the experience of the pandemic has changed his thinking in key ways. ?Ninety-nine years out of 100, I?m a libertarian,? he told me last year. ?But then there?s that one year out of 100.?

So this conversation is about the central tension that Tabarrok and I are grappling with right now: Government failure has never been more apparent ? and yet we need government more than ever.

We discuss (and debate) the public choice theory of government failure, why it?s so damn hard to build things in America, how reforms intended to weaken special interests often empower them, why the American right is responsible for much of the government dysfunction it criticizes, the case for state capacity libertarianism, the appropriate size of the welfare state, the political importance of massive economic inequality and how the crypto world?s pursuit of decentralization could backfire.

Mentioned:

The Rise and Decline of Nations by Mancur Olson

?It?s Time to Build? by Marc Andreessen

?The bulldozer vs. vetocracy political axis? by Vitalik Buterin

Book recommendations:

The Anarchy by William Dalrymple

India: A Story Through 100 Objects by Vidya Dehejia

The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-02-18
Länk till avsnitt

Relationships Are Hard. This Unusual Parenting Theory Can Help.

This is one of those episodes I feel I need to sell. Because on one level, it?s about an unusual theory of parenting known by the acronym RIE ? for the nonprofit group Resources for Infant Educarers, which promotes its principles ? that I?ve become interested in. But this isn?t a parenting podcast, and I know many of you don?t have young kids. The reason I?m doing this episode is that I think there?s something bigger here.

RIE is centered on the idea that infants and toddlers are whole people worthy of respect. It gets attention for some weird recommendations, like how we should ask babies? permission before changing a diaper or picking them up and how we should avoid distracting toddlers from a tantrum or seating them in a high chair. But underneath all that is something profound. A theory of how to build a relationship based on respect when words fail or are absent. A view of what it means to treat others with respect when we can?t count on respect being returned. And a recognition that in any interaction with another person, all we can really control is ourselves ? the boundaries we draw, the energy we carry and the values we express.

This is a profound way to think about adult relationships. And it?s a profound way to think about political relationships, too, if you extend the teachings outward.

Janet Lansbury is a RIE educator and the author of the books ?No Bad Kids? and ?Elevating Child Care.? She also hosts a popular parenting podcast, ?Janet Lansbury Unruffled.? It was through her work that I learned about RIE, so she was the perfect person to invite on for this discussion.

Mentioned:
Ezra?s conversation with Alison Gopnik

Book Recommendations:

Dear Parent: Caring for Infants with Respect by Magda Gerber

Siblings Without Rivalry by Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish

The Hurried Child by David Elkind

Biased by Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-02-15
Länk till avsnitt

It's Not Your Fault You Can't Pay Attention. Here's Why.

?The sensation of being alive in the early 21st century consisted of the sense that our ability to pay attention ? to focus ? was cracking and breaking,? writes Johann Hari in his new book, ?Stolen Focus.? Later he says, ?It felt like our civilization had been covered with itching powder and we spent our time twitching and twerking our minds, unable to simply give attention to things that matter.?

Same.

Attention is the most precious resource we have ? it?s the window through which we experience our lives. And for many of us, that window is fogging.

The knee-jerk response is to blame ourselves. If our attention is waning, it?s because we?re too distractible. But if there?s a single thesis of ?Stolen Focus,? it?s that we have a lot less control over our attention than we like to believe ? and not just because the apps on our smartphones are cunningly designed.

The book explores 12 factors that Hari believes are harming our ability to pay attention. And in it, there?s a clear distinction between what I?ve come to think of as the ?demand side? and the ?supply side? of attention. The demand side is the story we?re more familiar with: Entire economies and technologies are built around capturing, manipulating and directing our attention. But the supply side is just as important: A whole host of social conditions, from the food we eat to the amount we sleep to the chemicals in our air and the money in our bank accounts, determine the reservoirs of attention we have to draw on in the first place.

For Hari, that means that the state of our attention isn?t merely the product of individual failing or corporate manipulation ? it?s an outgrowth of some of the most fundamental aspects of our society, our culture and our economy. And as a result it can?t be fixed by a few tweaks at the margins. To do that requires a sustained, rather radical, political project.

As you?ll hear in the conversation, I don?t agree wholly with Hari?s argument. But I think it?s a much needed push to look at the most fundamental of human facilities through a new lens. Life is the sum total of what we pay attention to. What forces are in control of our attention ? and how we get it back ? is a defining question of our age.

Mentioned:

The Ezra Klein Show is hiring a managing producer. Learn more here.

Ezra?s conversation with Nadine Burke Harris

Book Recommendations;

The Anatomy of a Moment by Javier Cercas

Visitors by Anita Brookner

The Apology by V (formerly Eve Ensler)

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-02-11
Länk till avsnitt

What the Heck Is Going on With the U.S. Economy?

Should we be celebrating a Biden boom? Lamenting inflation and its consequences? Both?

We know how to talk about booms, like the ?90s. We know how to talk about busts, like after the financial crisis. We know how to talk about stagnation. What we don?t know how to talk about is contradictory extremes coexisting together. But that?s the economy we have right now. And a lot rides on figuring out how to balance those extremes. Because if we solve inflation while killing the labor market, we?ll have blown a hole in our foot to save our hand.

And so I wanted to talk today to Jason Furman, an economist at Harvard and the chair of Barack Obama?s Council of Economic Advisers from 2013 to 2017. What I appreciate about Jason is he doesn?t pretend the economy is only one thing or there?s only one lens for looking at it. He?s an unusually multimodeled thinker.

We discuss whether families and workers are making it out ahead given the dual realities of rising wages and rising prices, why so many economists and forecasters got this economy wrong, to what extent the Biden stimulus is responsible for both the booming economy and spiking inflation, whether the economic lessons of the financial crisis were overlearned, why Furman thinks supply-chain issues are ?overrated? as a cause of inflation, what the Great Resignation misses, how the Biden administration should restructure its Build Back Better bill, and more.

Book Recommendations:

The Myth of the Rational Voter by Bryan Caplan

The Weirdest People in the World by Joseph Henrich

Who We Are and How We Got Here by David Reich

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-02-08
Länk till avsnitt

Let?s Talk About How Truly Bizarre Our Supreme Court Is

?Getting race wrong early has led courts to get everything else wrong since,? writes Jamal Greene. But he probably doesn?t mean what you think he means.

Greene is a professor at Columbia Law School, and his book ?How Rights Went Wrong? is filled with examples of just how bizarre American Supreme Court outcomes have become. An information processing company claims the right to sell its patients? data to drug companies ? it wins. A group of San Antonio parents whose children attend a school with no air-conditioning, uncertified teachers and a falling apart school building sue for the right to an equal education ? they lose. A man from Long Island claims the right to use his homemade nunchucks to teach the ?Shafan Ha Lavan? karate style, which he made up, to his children ? he wins.

Greene?s argument is that in America, for specific reasons rooted in our ugly past, the way we think about rights has gone terribly awry. We don?t do constitutional law the way other countries do it. Rather, we recognize too few rights, and we protect them too strongly. That?s created a race to get everything ruled as a right, because once it?s a right, it?s unassailable. And that?s made the stakes of our constitutional conflicts too high. ?If only one side can win, it might as well be mine,? Greene writes. ?Conflict over rights can encourage us to take aim at our political opponents instead of speaking to them. And we shoot to kill.?

It?s a grim diagnosis. But, for Greene, it?s a hopeful one, too. Because it doesn?t have to be this way. Supreme Court decisions don?t have to feel so existential. Rights like food and shelter and education need not be wholly ignored by the courts. Other countries do things differently, and so can we.

This is a crucial moment for the court. Stephen Breyer is retiring. And in this term alone, the 6-3 conservative court is expected to hand down crucial decisions on some of the most divisive issues in American life: abortion, affirmative action, guns. So this is, in part, a conversation about the court we have and the decisions it is likely to make. But it?s also about what a radically different court system could look like.

We discuss the Supreme Court?s recent decisions on vaccine mandates, why Greene thinks judicial decision-making is closer to punditry than constitutional interpretation, the stark differences in how the German and American Supreme Courts handled the issue of abortion, Greene?s case for appointing nearly 200 justices to the U.S. Supreme Court, why we even have courts in the first place and much more.

Mentioned:

The Ezra Klein Show is hiring a managing producer. Learn more here.

Book Recommendations:

Rights Talk by Mary Ann Glendon

Law and Disagreement by Jeremy Waldron

Cult of the Constitution by Mary Anne Franks 

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris and Kristina Samulewski; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-02-04
Länk till avsnitt

Democrats Chase Shiny Objects. Here's How to Build Real Power.

There?s good reason to worry about the future of democracy, and little reason to believe Democrats have a viable plan for protecting it. They built their strategy around passing a major suite of voting reforms and protections through Congress, and a few weeks back, their whole agenda collapsed in the face of the filibuster. So what now? Is there a Plan B for protecting democracy?

Yes. But it begins with realizing that there is no national solution in a country that administers elections at the state and local levels. Which means it begins with realizing that many Democrats have made a mistake: They?ve focused so much on national conflicts that they?ve ceded state and local power to the right, with dangerous results. Trumpists can?t pass some big national bill putting Trump back in office, so they are organizing to win the state and local offices that will hold power over the process next time. Democracy?s defenders need to do the same. And that means you.

Amanda Litman is a co-founder of Run for Something, which recruits and supports young, progressive candidates who want to run for office. And so this is a conversation about the mechanics of American democracy, the confusions and myths that keep so many of us from participating in them and the practical question of what it means to step off the sidelines and, well, run for something. We talk about why Democrats tend to chase ?shiny objects? over real political power, what right-leaning organizations have been up to that liberals should envy, how you probably have more control over issues like abortion and climate change than you think, what it actually takes to run a local campaign, the three questions prospective candidates should be able to answer, and more.

This isn?t a conversation raging against the decaying of American democracy. This is a conversation about saving that democracy by participating at its most fundamental level: the local level. The one where you can have the most impact. And so it?s the rare conversation about democracy that left me feeling better, rather than worse, about what?s possible. I think it?ll do the same for you.

This episode contains strong language.

Mentioned:

The Ezra Klein Show is hiring a managing producer. Learn more here.

From ProPublica: ?Heeding Steve Bannon?s Call, Election Deniers Organize to Seize Control of the GOP ? and Reshape America?s Elections? by Isaac Arnsdorf, Doug Bock Clark, Alexandra Berzon and Anjeanette Damon

What It Takes by Richard Ben Cramer

Find out what elected offices you can run for

Book recommendations:

The Heart Principle by Helen Hoang

Olga Dies Dreaming by Xochitl Gonzalez

Let?s Get Physical by Danielle Friedman

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-02-01
Länk till avsnitt

Learning to Listen to the Voices Only You Hear

The world has gotten louder, even when we?re alone. A day spent in isolation can still mean a day buffeted by the voices on social media and the news, on podcasts, in emails and text messages. Objects have also gotten louder: through the advertisements that follow us around the web, the endless scroll of merchandise available on internet shopping sites and in the plentiful aisles of superstores. What happens when you really start listening to all these voices? What happens when you can?t stop hearing them?

Ruth Ozeki is a Zen Buddhist priest and the author of novels including ?A Tale for the Time Being,? which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and ?The Book of Form and Emptiness,? which I read over paternity leave and loved. ?The Book of Form and Emptiness? is about Benny, a teenager who starts hearing objects speak to him right after his father?s death, and it?s about his mother, Annabelle, who can?t let go of anything she owns, and can?t seem to help her son or herself. And then it?s about so much more than that: mental illnesses and materialism and consumerism and creative inspiration and information overload and the power of stories and the role of libraries and unshared mental experiences and on and on. It?s a book thick with ideas but written with a deceptively light, gentle pen.

Our conversation begins by exploring what it means to hear voices in our minds, and whether it?s really so rare. We talk about how Ozeki?s novels begin she hears a character speaking in her mind, how meditation can teach you to detach from own internal monologue, why Marie Kondo?s almost animist philosophy of tidying became so popular across the globe, whether objects want things, whether practicing Zen has helped her want less and, my personal favorite part, the dilemmas posed by an empty box with the words ?empty box? written on it.

Mentioned:

The Ezra Klein Show is hiring a managing producer. Learn more here.

The Great Shift by James L. Kugel

Book recommendations:

When You Greet Me I Bow by Norman Fischer

The Aleph and Other Stories by Jorge Luis Borges

Vibrant Matter by Jane Bennett

This episode contains a brief mention of suicidal ideation. If you are having thoughts of suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK). A list of additional resources is available at SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinsho[email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

2022-01-25
Länk till avsnitt

The View From the White House

It?s been a year since Joe Biden was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. And what a roller coaster of a year it?s been.

The Biden administration blew past its Covid vaccination goal of 100 million shots in 100 days, only to run into the realities of vaccine skepticism, the Delta wave and now Omicron. The president oversaw an unprecedented economic recovery ? including the sharpest one-year drop in unemployment in American history ? but now faces the highest inflation in decades, supply chain crises and souring approval ratings. Congress passed the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan and the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure law, but negotiations collapsed over the administration?s signature Build Back Better bill, and on Thursday the Senate failed to pass any voting rights legislation.

Ron Klain is President Biden?s chief of staff and one of the most influential members of the current administration. We discuss what the United States can learn from Asian countries? pandemic strategies, what went wrong with America?s testing regime, the administration?s plan for tackling inflation, what it will take to be prepared for the next variant, what Klain has learned about what private sector can ? and can?t ? accomplish on its own, the fate of Build Back Better, what can excite Democrats for the 2022 midterms, the status of relations between the White House and Joe Manchin, how the administration is thinking about the 6-to-3 conservative Supreme Court majority and more.

Mentioned:

The Ezra Klein Show is looking for a managing producer. Learn more.

Book Recommendation:

The Gatekeepers by Chris Whipple

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Mary Marge Locker and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-01-21
Länk till avsnitt

The Pandemic Lessons We Clearly Haven?t Learned

I remember thinking, as Covid ravaged the country in December 2020, that at least the holidays the next year would be better. There would be more vaccines, more treatments, more immunity. Instead, we got Omicron and a confusing new phase of the pandemic. What do you do with a variant that is both monstrously more infectious and somewhat milder? What do you say about another year when we didn?t have enough tests, enough ventilation or the best guidance on masks? And how do you handle the fracturing politics of a changing pandemic in an exhausted country?

Zeynep Tufekci is a sociologist and New York Times Opinion columnist who does a better job than almost anyone at assessing the pandemic at a systems level. To solve a public-health crisis, it?s not enough to get the science right. There are also challenges with supply chains, infrastructure, research production, mass communication, political trust and institutional inertia. I?ve found Tufekci?s ability to balance the epidemiological data and the sociological realities uniquely helpful across the pandemic, and you can hear why in this conversation.

We discuss how the Covid crisis has changed, as well as Tufekci?s sobering conclusion: that the virus, at this point, is feeding on our dysfunction. We look at what Omicron is and isn?t, where the Biden administration has succeeded and failed, the debate over closing schools, why so many Asian countries have so powerfully outperformed the West, how the role of vaccines has changed, what a pandemic-prepared society would actually look like, and what should be true of our pandemic policy in a year that isn?t now.

Book recommendations:

The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy by Irvin D. Yalom and Molyn Leszcz

Chaos by James Gleick

The Dead Hand by David Hoffman

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Mary Marge Locker and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-01-18
Länk till avsnitt

Chris Hayes on How Biden Can Have a Better 2022

Nothing like a newborn and paternity leave to leave you feeling a bit out of the loop. So for my first podcast back since October, I wanted to wander through the thickets of where we are politically and how we got here.

Because where we are is strange: the Omicron wave and the breakdown of the liberal Covid consensus that preceded it; a hot economy with low unemployment, rising wages and high inflation; a Build Back Better bill for which the eventual compromise seems obvious even as the legislation is stalled; the anniversary of Jan. 6, which comes as both of the Democrats? major democracy bills are languishing; and a Biden administration that has passed big, popular policies, only to watch its poll numbers fall.

Chris Hayes is the host of MSNBC?s ?All In? and the podcast ?Why Is This Happening?? He?s also one of my favorite people to process politics with, so I asked him to help me track back through the past few months of the news and look into how 2022 could be better.

Mentioned:

?The Ronald Reagan Guide to Joe Biden?s Political Future? by Jamelle Bouie

?How Michel Foucault Lost the Left and Won the Right? by Ross Douthat

?Ten Million a Year? by David Wallace-Wells

?On the Internet, We?re Always Famous? by Chris Hayes

Book recommendations:

The Braindead Megaphone by George Saunders

The Three-Body Problem Series by Cixin Liu

The Racial Contract by Charles W. Mills

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of ?The Ezra Klein Show? at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

2022-01-11
Länk till avsnitt

Best Of: This Conversation Will Change How You Think About Thinking

For decades, our society?s dominant metaphor for the mind has been a computer. A machine that operates the exact same way whether it?s in a dark room or next to a sunny window, whether it?s been working for 30 seconds or three hours, whether it?s near other computers or completely alone.

But that?s wrong. Annie Murphy Paul?s ?The Extended Mind? argues, convincingly, that the human mind is contextual. It works differently in different environments, with different tools, amid different bodily states, among other minds.

Here?s the problem: Our schools, our workplaces, our society are built atop that bad metaphor. Activities and habits that we?ve been taught to associate with creativity and efficiency often stunt our thinking, and so much that we?ve been taught to dismiss ? activities that look like leisure, play or rest ? are crucial to thinking (and living!) well.

Paul?s book, read correctly, is a radical critique of not just how we think about thinking, but how we?ve constructed much of our society. In this conversation, originally released in July 2021, we discuss how the body can pick up on patterns before the conscious mind knows what it?s seen, why forcing kids (and adults) to ?sit still? makes it harder for them to think clearly, the connection between physical movement and creativity, why efficiency is often the enemy of productivity, the restorative power of exposure to the natural world, the dystopian implications of massive cognitive inequality, why open-plan offices were a terrible idea and much more.

Mentioned: 

"The extended mind" by Andy Clark and David J. Chalmers

Book recommendations: 

Supersizing the Mind by Andy Clark

Mind in Motion by Barbara Tversky

Thoughts Without a Thinker by Mark Epstein

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein.

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Alison Bruzek.

2022-01-04
Länk till avsnitt

Best Of: Why Sci-Fi Legend Ted Chiang Fears Capitalism, Not A.I.

For years, I?ve kept a list of dream guests for this show. And as long as that list has existed, Ted Chiang has been atop it.

Chiang is a science fiction writer. But that undersells him. He has released two short story collections over 20 years ? 2002?s ?Stories of Your Life and Others? and 2019?s ?Exhalation.? Those stories have won more awards than I can list, and one of them was turned into the film ?Arrival.? They are remarkable pieces of work: Each is built around a profound scientific, philosophical or religious idea, and then the story or the story structure is shaped to represent that idea. They are wonders of precision and craft. But unlike a lot of science fiction, they are never cold. Chiang?s work is deeply, irrepressibly humane.

I?ve always wondered about the mind that would create Chiang?s stories. And in this conversation, originally released in March 2021, I got to watch it in action. Chiang doesn?t like to talk about himself. But he does like to talk about ideas. And so we do: We discuss the difference between magic and technology, why superheroes fight crime but ignore injustice, what it would do to the human psyche if we knew the future is fixed, whether free will exists, whether we?d want to know the exact date of our deaths, why Chiang fears what humans will do to artificial intelligence more than what A.I. will do to humans, the way capitalism turns people against technology, and much more.

The ideas Chiang offered in this conversation are still ringing in my head months later, and changing the way I see the world. It?s worth taking your time with this one.

Recommendations: 

"Creation" by Steve Grand

"On the Measure of Intelligence" by Francois Chollet

"CivilWarLand in Bad Decline" by George Saunders

"A Visit from the Goon Squad" by Jennifer Egan

"Royal Space Force: The Wings of Honnêamise" (movie)

"On Fragile Waves" by Lily Yu

"Pilgrim at Tinker Creek" by Annie Dillard

Control (video game)

Return of the Obra Dinn (video game)

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein.

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected].

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Alison Bruzek.

2021-12-28
Länk till avsnitt

Best Of: Noam Chomsky's Theory of the Good Life

How do you introduce Noam Chomsky? Perhaps you start here: In 1979, The New York Times called him ?arguably the most important intellectual alive today.? More than 40 years later, Chomsky, at 92, is still putting his dent in the world ? writing books, giving interviews, changing minds.

There are different sides to Chomsky. He?s a world-renowned linguist who revolutionized his field. He?s a political theorist who?s been a sharp critic of American foreign policy for decades. He?s an anarchist who believes in a radically different way of ordering society. He?s a pragmatist who pushed leftists to vote for Joe Biden in 2020 and has described himself as having a ?rather conservative attitude towards social change.? He is, very much, himself.

The problem in planning a conversation with Chomsky is how to get at all these different sides. So this one, from April 2021, covers a lot of ground. We discuss:

? Why Chomsky is an anarchist, and how he defines anarchism

? How his work on language informs his idea of what human beings want

? The role of advertising in capitalism

? Whether we should understand job contracts as the free market at work or a form of constant coercion

? How Chomsky?s ideal vision of society differs from Nordic social democracy

? How Chomsky?s class-based theory of politics holds up in an era where college-educated suburbanites are moving left on economics

? Chomsky?s view of the climate crisis and why he thinks the ?degrowth? movement is misguided

? Whether job automation could actually be a good thing for human flourishing

? Chomsky?s views on US-China policy, and why he doesn?t think China is a major geopolitical threat

? The likelihood of nuclear war in the next decade

And much more. 

Mentioned in this episode: 

On Anarchism by Noam Chomsky 

Climate Crisis and the Global Green New Deal by Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin

 ?Why the Amazon Workers Never Stood a Chance? by Erik Loomis 

?Trends in Income From 1975 to 2018? by Carter C. Price and Kathryn A. Edwards 

?This is What Minimum Wage Would Be If It Kept Pace with Productivity? by Dean Baker

?There is no Plan B for dealing with the climate crisis? by Raymond Pierrehumbert

Recommendations: 

"The Last of the Just" by Andre Schwarz-Bart

"All God's Dangers: The Life of Nate Shaw" by Theodore Rosengarten

Selected essays by Ahad Ha'am

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein.

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected].

 

2021-12-21
Länk till avsnitt

Timeless Wisdom for Leading a Life of Love, Friendship and Learning

?Today, we are supercompetent when it comes to efficiency, utility, speed, convenience, and getting ahead in the world; but we are at a loss concerning what it?s all for,? Leon Kass writes in his 2017 book ?Leading a Worthy Life.? ?This lack of cultural and moral confidence about what makes a life worth living is perhaps the deepest curse of living in our interesting time.?

Kass spent more than 30 years as an award-winning teacher at the University of Chicago, where he gained a reputation among students for his commitment to the big questions of human existence and the study of classic texts. And he?s written books and essays on marriage, sports, ethics, friendship, romance, the philosophy of food, biblical wisdom and more. In many ways, Kass?s career represents a lifelong effort to grapple with the biggest question of all: What does it mean to live a meaningful life?

This conversation, between Kass and the New York Times Opinion columnist David Brooks, is an attempt to answer that question. Along the way, they discuss the difference between choosing a career and discovering a vocation; the key ingredients of a successful romantic relationship; how to distinguish between superficial friendships and life-altering ones; why finding the right job is less about searching within ourselves and more about committing to something beyond ourselves; Kass?s view that the most distinctive thing about individuals isn?t their race, gender or class but ?the ruling passions of their souls?; and what the biblical Exodus story can teach Americans about how to live together more harmoniously.

Mentioned:

Founding God?s Nation by Leon Kass

The Second Mountain by David Brooks

Book Recommendations:

Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle

The Hebrew Bible, especially Genesis and Exodus

Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville

Daniel Deronda by George Eliot

This episode is guest-hosted by David Brooks, a New York Times columnist, whose work focuses on politics, culture and moral formation. He currently serves as chair of Weave: The Social Fabric Project at the Aspen Institute in Washington, D.C. and is the author of several books, including ?The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life.? You can follow him on Twitter @nytdavidbrooks. (Learn more about the other guest hosts during Ezra?s parental leave here.)

Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at [email protected]

You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.

?The Ezra Klein Show? is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Alison Bruzek.

2021-12-14
Länk till avsnitt
Hur lyssnar man på podcast?

En liten tjänst av I'm With Friends. Finns även på engelska.
Uppdateras med hjälp från iTunes.