Sveriges 100 mest populära podcasts

Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

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apa.org/speakingofpsychology

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Living a happy single life, with Geoff MacDonald, PhD

More Americans than ever before are single -- about half of American adults are unmarried and close to three in 10 are not in a committed relationship. Geoff MacDonald, PhD, of the University of Toronto, talks about how relationship status is related to well-being, whether there is a societal stigma against singles, and why there is so much more research on being in a happy relationship than there is on being happily single.

2022-11-16
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Why humans and other primates care so much about fairness, with Sarah Brosnan, PhD

Questions of fairness, justice and morality might seem unique to humans. But research suggests that non-human animals notice inequality as well. Dr. Sarah Brosnan, of Georgia State University, talks about how non-human primates and other animals react to unfair situations, why we humans care so much about fairness, and how studying non-human animals can help us better understand how our human sense of justice evolved.

2022-11-09
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Why you should apologize even when it?s hard to, with Karina Schumann, PhD

Apologies have the potential to heal relationships, soothe hurt feelings and even begin to address historical wrongs. But they?re not always easy to offer. Karina Schumann, PhD, of the University of Pittsburgh, discusses why apologies matter, what makes for a good, effective apology and what makes for a bad one, whether women really do apologize more than men, what to do when someone wants to apologize to you but you?re not ready to forgive them, and the role of institutional and government apologies in addressing historical injustice.

2022-11-02
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Understanding medical marijuana, CBD and more, with Ziva Cooper, PhD

Over the past few years, the number and variety of cannabis products legally available to American consumers has soared. Ziva Cooper, PhD, of the UCLA Center for Cannabis and Cannabinoids, talks about how researchers are exploring both the potential health benefits and the risks of marijuana, CBD and more, aiming to make sure that the science keeps up with policy changes and the evolving marketplace.


Links


Ziva Cooper, PhD

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-10-26
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Relationship advice from a couple psychologist, with Anthony Chambers, PhD

When relationship issues arise -- around money, fidelity, kids or even just coping with the stress of everyday life -- couple therapists can help partners work through them together. Couple and family psychologist Anthony Chambers, PhD, talks about how couple therapy works, when it?s useful, when couples are most likely to break up, and why it?s helpful to think of talking with your partner as a game of catch rather than a tennis match.


Links


Anthony Chambers, PhD

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-10-19
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Why we procrastinate and what to do about it, with Fuschia Sirois, PhD

We all know the feeling of scrambling at the last minute to finish a task that we could have and should have tackled much sooner. Fuschia Sirois, PhD, of Durham University, talks about why procrastination is an emotion regulation problem, not one of laziness or poor time management skills; how it can harm our mental and physical health; why it?s so tied up with guilt and shame; and how self-compassion can help us overcome it.  


Links


Fuchsia Sirois, PhD

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-10-12
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How to stop mass shootings, with Jillian Peterson, PhD

Americans have become accustomed to tragic headlines of mass shootings in schools, grocery stores and other public places ? these shootings still shock, but they no longer surprise. Jillian Peterson, PhD, of Hamline University, talks about research on what drives most mass shooters, why thinking of mass shootings as suicides as well as homicides can suggest new ways to combat them, and what can be done in schools, workplaces and elsewhere to make the next mass shooting less likely.

 

Links

 

Jillian Peterson, PhD

 

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-10-05
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The psychology of political messaging, with Drew Westen, PhD

Psychologists? research has found that it?s not the nuances of policy debates that drive voter behavior but instead how voters feel about candidates and political parties -- and whom they trust to share their values. Drew Westen, PhD, of Emory University, talks about how emotions drive our political behavior, what makes for an effective political speech or ad campaign, and what role political messaging may be playing in shaping our increasingly polarized public discourse. 

 

Links

 

Drew Westen, PhD

 

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-09-28
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Reading minds using brain scans, with Kenneth Norman, PhD

The idea of a machine that can read your thoughts sounds more like science fiction than actual science. But in recent years, it?s come closer to reality. Kenneth Norman, PhD, of Princeton University, talks about how scientists decode thoughts from patterns of brain activity, what we can learn about thinking, learning and memory from this research, how it could be useful in mental health treatment, and more.


Links


Kenneth Norman, PhD

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-09-21
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How the need to belong drives human behavior, with Geoffrey L. Cohen, PhD

The desire to belong is a fundamental part of human nature. Geoffrey Cohen, PhD, of Stanford University, talks about how feeling like an outsider can harm us; why threats to belonging drive problems as varied as achievement gaps and political polarization; and how to boost people?s sense of belonging, especially among those most at risk of feeling like outsiders.


LInks


Geoffrey Cohen, PhD

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-09-14
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How to spend your time more wisely, with Cassie Holmes, PhD

When you feel time-poor, endless hours of free time might sound like the ultimate luxury. But psychologists? research suggests that it?s not simply the amount of time that you have, but how you spend it, that determines your happiness. Cassie Holmes, PhD, discusses whether there?s an ideal amount of free time, how to increase your sense of ?time affluence? and how tracking your time can help you live a happier life.     Links     Cassie Holmes, PhD Speaking of Psychology Home Page
2022-09-07
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How job loss and economic stress affect workers and their families, with Anna Gassman-Pines, PhD

For many Americans, the past two-and-a-half years have been a time of economic turmoil. Anna Gassman-Pines, PhD, of Duke University, talks about how job loss, unstable work schedules and other hardships affect workers, their families and even entire communities, and about how working families ? particularly low-wage workers ? fared through the pandemic.

Links

Anna Gassman-Pines, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

2022-08-31
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Understanding the teenage brain, with Eva Telzer, PhD

There?s a common stereotype is that teenagers? brains are immature and underdeveloped, and that teens are ?hard-wired? to take unwise risks and cave to peer pressure. But psychologists? research suggests these negative stereotypes are unfounded and that the teen years are a time opportunity and growth as well as risk. Eva Telzer, PhD, explains why teens take more risks and why that risk-taking is sometimes beneficial, why parents have more influence than they think, and how social media and other technology use may be affecting teens? behavior and development.

Links     Eva Telzer, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Home Page
2022-08-24
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Can you be addicted to food? With Ashley Gearhardt, PhD

We live in a nation awash with cheap, easy-to-get calories, mostly from highly processed convenience foods. Now, some researchers argue that these foods may actually be addictive ? just like cigarettes or alcohol. Ashley Gearhardt, PhD, of the University of Michigan, talks about why highly processed foods may trigger addiction, the difference between addiction and simply liking to indulge in treats, who is most at risk for food addiction, and more.


Links


Ashley Gearhardt, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-08-17
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Encore - How to overcome feeling like an imposter, with Lisa Orbé-Austin, PhD, and Kevin Cokley, PhD

Do you ever feel like a phony? Like you?re not really qualified for the job you?re doing, despite your achievements? Those are signs of the impostor phenomenon, also called impostor syndrome. Dr. Lisa Orbé-Austin, a counseling psychologist and career coach in New York City, and Dr. Kevin Cokley, a University of Texas at Austin psychology professor who studies the impostor phenomenon among ethnic minority students, discuss where impostor feelings come from, the repercussions they can have in people?s lives, and what you can do to address imposter feelings.

2022-08-10
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Encore - Tasty words, colorful sounds - How people with synesthesia experience the world, with Julia Simner, PhD

More than 4% of people have some form of synesthesia, a neurological condition that causes senses to link and merge. People with synesthesia may taste words, hear colors, or see calendar dates arrayed in physical space. Dr. Julia Simner, a professor of neuropsychology at the University of Sussex in the U.K., discusses the many forms of synesthesia, how synesthetes experience the world, and what scientists have learned from brain imaging studies about synesthesia. She also discusses her research on other sensory differences such as misophonia, an extreme aversion to specific sounds.

2022-08-03
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What is borderline personality disorder? With Carla Sharp, PhD

Borderline personality disorder is one of the most frequently diagnosed personality disorders, and one of the most misunderstood. Carla Sharp, PhD, of the University of Houston, discusses how BPD is diagnosed, defined and treated, how family members can help children and adults with BPD, and how the disorder fits in with researchers? evolving understanding of personality disorders in general.

 

Links


Carla Sharp, PhD

 

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-07-27
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The truth about why kids lie, with Victoria Talwar, PhD

Most parents want to raise their children to be honest adults, so the first time that they catch their child in a lie it may come as an unpleasant surprise. But psychologists? research has found that lying is a normal part of childhood. In fact, it?s a developmental milestone. Victoria Talwar, PhD, of McGill University, talks about why kids lie, how lying is tied to cognitive development, how children understand the morality of lying (including the ?gray areas? of keeping secrets and tattling), and how parents can encourage truth-telling and honesty in their children. 

 

Links

 

Victoria Talwar, PhD

 

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-07-20
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Can we unlearn implicit biases? With Mahzarin Banaji, PhD

The idea that people have biases that operate below the level of conscious thought is uncomfortable. But decades of research have found that many people who would never consciously agree with prejudiced statements against Black people, LGBTQ people or women can nonetheless harbor implicit biases toward these groups and others. Mahzarin Banaji, PhD, one of the pioneers of implicit bias research, talks about where implicit biases come from, the difference between implicit bias and prejudice, and which biases have lessened ? and which have not ? in recent years.     Links     Mahzarin Banaji, PhD     Speaking of Psychology Home Page

 

2022-07-13
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Perfectionism: When good is never good enough, with Gordon Flett, PhD, and Bonnie Zucker, PsyD

Perfectionism might seem like a minor hurdle to overcome ? or even a welcome personality trait. But perfectionism is different from simply striving for excellence and perfectionistic people are at higher risk for anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Perfectionism researcher Gordon Flett, PhD, and clinical psychologist Bonnie Zucker, PsyD, discuss where perfectionism comes from, why it?s an increasing problem, how it affects people?s mental and physical health and how to treat it.

Links


Gordon Flett, PhD


Bonnie Zucker, PsyD


Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-07-06
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Revealing the Hidden Brain, with Shankar Vedantam

How much insight do people have into why they behave the way they do? Science journalist Shankar Vedantam, host of the Hidden Brain podcast and author of ?Useful Delusions: The Power and Paradox of the Self-Deceiving Brain,? talks about why he is fascinated by the paradoxes of human behavior, what it takes to bring the popular podcast to life, and why it?s important to show the public the challenges as well as the triumphs of science.


Links

The Hidden Brain

Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-06-29
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Why can some people speak dozens of languages? with Ev Fedorenko, PhD

For those of us who speak only one language, the idea of learning twenty or thirty sounds impossible. But there are ?hyperpolyglots? who have managed this remarkable feat. Evelina Fedorenko, PhD, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, discusses what sets polyglots apart and what scientists might learn from studying them. She also discusses how language is processed in the brain, why it?s so much easier for kids to learn languages than adults, the relationship between language and thought and how we can think without language, and more.

Links

Ev Fedorenko, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Home Page

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2022-06-22
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Abortion and mental health, with Antonia Biggs, PhD

Dozens of states are poised to outlaw or dramatically restrict abortion if the Supreme Court overturns its 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. Antonia Biggs, PhD, a social psychologist at the University of California San Francisco, talks about the results of the Turnaway Study, which examined how receiving an abortion ? or being denied one ? affects mental health and well-being, the effects of laws that limit access to abortion, and what a post-Roe future might look like.

Links

Antonia Biggs, PhD
The Turnaway Study
Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-06-15
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How living with secrets can harm you, with Michael Slepian, PhD

We all keep secrets ? on average, people have about 13 secrets at any one time, five of which they have never told another person. Psychologist Michael Slepian, PhD, of Columbia Business School, talks about what types of secrets people keep, why keeping a secret bottled up inside can harm us, how keeping secrets -- or sharing them -- affects people?s relationships with each other, how we decide whom we can trust with our secrets, and whether other people can tell when we?re holding something back.

Links

Michael Slepian, PhD
The Secret Life of Secrets
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

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2022-06-08
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Can an app improve your health? With Gary Bennett, PhD

Digital interventions that promise to help you achieve your health and fitness goals are everywhere. But do these apps work and are they a useful public health tool? Gary Bennett, PhD, director of the Duke University Global Digital Health Science Center, discusses how digital interventions can help address obesity and other public health challenges, how to find apps that are effective and backed by research, the challenge of weight stigma, and more.

Links

Gary Bennett, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

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2022-06-01
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Racism, racial discrimination and mental health, with Riana Elyse Anderson, PhD

The past two years have taken a heavy toll on the health, mental health and well-being of people of color, who have suffered disproportionately from the COVID-19 pandemic while also facing what some call a second pandemic of racism. Riana Elyse Anderson, PhD, a clinical psychologist and professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, discusses why racism is like a virus and what can be done to help people deal with race-based traumatic stress and to protect children against its harmful effects.

Links

Riana Elyse Anderson, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

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2022-05-25
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What is dissociative identity disorder? With Bethany Brand, PhD

Dissociative identity disorder ? which many people recognize by its former name, multiple personality disorder ? is one of Hollywood?s favorite psychology-related topics, with a decades-long history of movie and TV portrayals, most recently in this spring?s ?Moon Knight.? But in real life, DID does not look like it does on the screen. Bethany Brand, PhD, of Towson University, discusses why it is more subtle than TV and movie portrayals would lead viewers to believe, what is happening in the brains of patients who experience it and what treatments are available.

2022-05-18
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Are we in a ?loneliness pandemic?? With Louise Hawkley, PhD

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic scrambled our social connections, Americans were worried about an epidemic of loneliness. Louise Hawkley, PhD, principal research scientist at NORC at the University of Chicago, talks about the difference between being alone and being lonely, how loneliness can harm our health, whether we really are lonelier than ever these days, and how to identify and address the root causes of loneliness.

Links

Louise Hawkley, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

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2022-05-11
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Is technology killing empathy? With Sherry Turkle, PhD

Over the past couple of decades, our devices have become our constant companions. More and more, we live in a digital, virtual world. Dr. Sherry Turkle, MIT professor and founding director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self, discusses how digital communication has affected our ability to talk to each other, how conversation itself changed in the digital age, why she thinks social media is an ?anti-empathy machine? and her advice on how to reclaim space for conversation in our lives.

Links

Sherry Turkle, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

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2022-05-04
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What psychology has to say about art, with Ellen Winner, PhD

Art is universal ? there has never been a human society without it. But we don?t always agree on what makes for good art, or even what makes something art at all. Ellen Winner, PhD, of Boston College, talks about how psychology can help answer the question ?What is art?? why even non-experts can tell the difference between a child?s painting and an abstract masterpiece, why art forgeries bother us so much, the purpose of arts education, and more.

Links:

Ellen Winner, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

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2022-04-27
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How exercise benefits the brain, with Jenny Etnier, PhD

Most people realize that being sedentary is bad for your physical health. But exercise ? or the lack of it ? can affect our cognitive health as well. Jenny Etnier, PhD, of the University of North Carolina Greensboro, discusses how exercise improves memory, the cognitive benefits of physical activity, the importance of youth sports and the downside of hyper-competitive youth sports culture.

Links:

Jenny Entier, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

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2022-04-20
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Surviving the trauma of war in Ukraine, with Laura Murray, PhD

Since Russia invaded Ukraine in late February, more than 4 million Ukrainians have had to flee the country as refugees, more than 6 million others have been internally displaced, and tens of millions more have lived through shelling and other traumas. Laura Murray, PhD, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, talks about mental health care during war and other disasters, what providers in Ukraine are experiencing on the ground, and what we know about the mental health effects of living through war.

Links:

Laura Murray, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

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2022-04-13
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How to keep stress from harming your health, with George Slavich, PhD

The American Psychological Association?s most recent Stress in America survey found record high levels of stress among Americans of all ages. Dr. George Slavich, director of the UCLA Laboratory for Stress Assessment and Research, discusses how stress affects our brain, body and immune system, why it?s important to measure a person?s lifetime exposure to stress, and strategies to manage stress and minimize its negative effects on your health.

Links

George Slavich, PhD
Stress in America Survey
Stress effects on the body
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

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2022-04-06
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How grieving changes the brain, with Mary-Frances O?Connor, PhD

Few of us will make it through life without losing someone we love. Mary-Frances O?Connor, PhD, of the University of Arizona, discusses howneuroscience can help us to better understand grief and resilience after loss, why grief is different from depression, effective therapy for grief, whether it?s possible to experience grief over the death of a celebrity, and how to support people when they are grieving.

Links

Mary-Frances O?Connor, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

2022-03-30
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How to Keep Anger from Getting the Best of You with Howard Kassinove, PhD, and Raymond ?Chip? Tafrate, PhD

Anger is a normal human emotion, a natural reaction when you feel that something or someone has done you wrong. But anger can also turn violent and dangerous, can ruin relationships and can interfere with our health and happiness. Howard Kassinove, PhD, of Hofstra University, and Raymond ?Chip? Tafrate, PhD, of Central Connecticut State University, discuss the difference between healthy and harmful anger, strategies to cope with anger, and why ?primal screams,? rage rooms and other forms of anger catharsis can do more harm than good.

Links

Howard Kassinove, PhD
Raymond ?Chip? Tafrate, PhD
APA Psychology Topics - Anger
Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-03-23
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Why psychopathy is more common than you think, with Abigail Marsh, PhD

Most of us think we know what a psychopath looks like. The word brings to mind images of horror movies and criminals. But psychopathy is far more common than most people realize, and actually hard to recognize in other people. Abigail Marsh, PhD, of Georgetown University, discusses what researchers have learned about the causes of psychopathy and effective treatments for it, how to recognize psychopathy in those around you, and her work exploring the emotional processes and the brain differences that underlie both psychopathy and its opposite, extraordinary altruism.

Links

Abigail Marsh, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Website

2022-03-16
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Ambiguous loss and the ?myth of closure,? with Pauline Boss, PhD

March 11 marks two years since the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic. With another variant waning, many people are hoping, yet again, to close the book on COVID and move on. But what if there?s a different way to think about life after loss? Pauline Boss, PhD, author of ?The Myth of Closure: Ambiguous Loss in a Time of Pandemic and Change,? talks about what we have learned about grief, resilience and moving on after two years of pandemic life.

Links

Pauline Boss, PhD
Speaking of Psychology Home Page

2022-03-09
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How our siblings influence our lives, with Laurie Kramer, PhD, and Megan Gilligan, PhD

Our brothers and sisters are our first friends and first rivals, and the relationships that we have with our siblings are often the longest lasting relationships of our lives. Laurie Kramer, PhD, of Northeastern University, and Megan Gilligan, PhD, of Iowa State University, talk about how our siblings influence our lives from childhood through adulthood, how parents can help foster close relationships among their children, and what people can do in adulthood to maintain and improve relationships with their own siblings.

Show Links

Laurie Kramer, PhD
Megan Gilligan, PhD
funwithsistersandbrothers.org
Speaking of Psychology Homepage

2022-03-02
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Poker, con artists and the psychology of risk and deception, with Maria Konnikova, PhD

Why do intelligent people give money to self-proclaimed psychics or get sucked into Ponzi schemes? Why are most of us so bad at judging risk? Journalist, psychologist and professional poker player Maria Konnikova, PhD, author of the ?The Biggest Bluff? and ?The Confidence Game,? talks about why anyone can fall for a con, the psychology of risk, and how her knowledge of psychology did?and didn?t?help her at the poker table.

Links

Maria Konnikova, PhD

2022-02-23
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Fighting the stigma of mental illness, with Patrick Corrigan, PsyD

Despite how common mental illness is, people with mental illness often keep their diagnosis a closely guarded secret in the face of widespread stigma and discrimination. Patrick Corrigan, PhD, editor of APA?s journal Stigma and Health, discusses where this stigma comes from, how it affects people?s lives, why it?s important for those with mental illness to share their stories, and whether or not celebrities? new openness about mental health is decreasing stigma.

2022-02-16
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What makes love last? With Arthur Aron, PhD

Most of us expect the intensity of new love to fade over time. But some couples remain deeply in love for the long haul, even after years or decades together. What sets those relationships apart? Are some couples just lucky? Or are there things that you can do to sustain love, or rekindle it, in any long-term relationship? Dr. Arthur Aron, of Stonybrook University, discusses what the science says about the secrets of long-term love.

Links
Arthur Aron, PhD - https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/psychology/faculty/faculty_profiles/aaron
36 Questions in Love - http://36questionsinlove.com

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2022-02-09
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Why we choose to suffer, with Paul Bloom, PhD

Why do people like to watch scary movies or listen to sad songs? We do we run marathons and raise children, even though both of those pursuits come with struggle and pain? Dr. Paul Bloom discusses why suffering is linked to meaning in life, the connection between pleasure and pain, and the difference between chosen and unchosen suffering.

Links

Paul Bloom, PhD - https://psychology.yale.edu/people/paul-bloom
Speaking of Psychology - https://www.apa.org/speakingofpsychology

 

2022-02-02
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Why is it so hard for adults to make friends? With Maris Franco, PhD

As an adult, making new friends ? and maintaining old friendships ? can be tough. Life is busy and friends end up taking a backseat to other relationships and responsibilities. Dr. Marisa Franco, psychologist and friendship expert, talks about how to make new friends and strengthen and rekindle old friendship ties, why Americans? friendship networks are shrinking, the differences between men?s and women?s friendships, and more.

2022-01-26
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The people who never forget a face, with Josh Davis, PhD, and Kelly Desborough

Super-recognizers have an extraordinary ability to recognize faces ? they can pick faces they?ve seen only briefly out of a crowd and can recognize childhood acquaintances they haven?t seen in decades. Dr. Josh Davis, a professor of applied psychology at the University of Greenwich, and super-recognizer Kelly Desborough, discuss the origins of this ability, why you can?t train yourself to be a super-recognizer, how super-recognizers compare with facial-recognition algorithms, and why security organizations are interested in working with super-recognizers.

2022-01-19
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What is anxiety and how can we treat it effectively? With Bunmi Olatunji, PhD

We?ve all had good reason to feel anxious over the past two years. But sometimes, anxiety is more than a normal response to stress. Anxiety disorders are among the most common of all mental health disorders, affecting an estimated 15% to 20% of people at some point in their life. Dr. Bunmi Olatunji, director of the Emotion and Anxiety Research Lab at Vanderbilt University, discusses the emotions that drive anxiety disorders, how to treat them effectively, and how people can recognize the difference between feeling anxious and an anxiety disorder ? and know when it?s time to seek help.

2022-01-12
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Healing pain by treating the mind, with Tor Wager, PhD

More than 20 percent of U.S. adults suffer from some form of chronic pain. For many, effective treatment remains elusive, with medications and even surgeries giving little in the way of relief. But in recent years, psychologists? research has begun to suggest that at least for some people, the answer to chronic pain may come not from healing the body but from treating the mind. Dr. Tor Wager, of Dartmouth University, discusses the relationship among our thoughts, feelings and beliefs about pain and the actual physical pain that we feel, what pain looks like in the brain, and how new research findings are leading to effective new treatments for pain.

2022-01-05
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Encore - Unlocking the mysteries of smell, our most underappreciated sense, with Pamela Dalton, PhD

Many people around the world have lost their sense of smell this past year due to COVID-19. Before the pandemic, scientists had already begun to gain a deeper understanding of how sophisticated our sense of smell is and how it is intertwined with our mental and physical health. Now, the pandemic is giving that research new urgency. Pamela Dalton, PhD, of the Monell Chemical Senses Center, discusses what we know about how our sense of smell works, the connections between smell, emotions and memory, how a rapid smell test could improve COVID-19 screening, how she developed the ?world?s worst smell,? and more.

Links

Pamela Dalton, PhD
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Music

Electronic Ambient Loop by tyops via Freesound.org

2021-12-29
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Encore - What is it like to remember every day of your life, with Michael Yassa, PhD, and Markie Pasternak

For people with Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory, or HSAM, every day is memorable. Ask them what they were doing on this date 10 years ago, and they?ll be able to tell you. Markie Pasternak, one of the youngest people identified with HSAM, and Michael Yassa, PhD, director of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory at the University of California Irvine, talk about what it?s like to have this ability, what we know about how the brains of people with HSAM store and retrieve this vast amount of autobiographical information, and what studying this unique ability can teach us more generally about how memory works.

2021-12-22
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Psychology takes toys seriously, with Barry Kudrowitz, PhD, and Doris Bergen, PhD

Just in time for toy-buying season, Dr. Barry Kudrowitz, a toy designer and professor of product design at the University of Minnesota, and Dr. Doris Bergen, a professor emerita of educational psychology at Miami University in Ohio, discuss the psychology of toys. What makes something a good toy? Why do some toys stand the test of time while others fizzle out after one season? How has technology changed the way kids play with toys? Does gender affect kids? toy choices? And do we ever grow out of toys?

2021-12-15
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The secret to being a ?SuperAger,? with Emily Rogalski, PhD

For most people lucky enough to live a long life, aging comes with some cognitive decline. But memory loss isn?t inevitable. Some people -- ?SuperAgers? -- have memory abilities that remain intact into their 80s, 90s and even beyond. Emily Rogalski, PhD, head of the SuperAger study at Northwestern University, talks about what sets these SuperAgers apart, how their brains differ from the brains of people who age in a more typical way, and what might we learn from studying SuperAgers that could, potentially, help the rest of us to age better.

2021-12-08
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