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The Film Comment Podcast

The Film Comment Podcast

Founded in 1962, Film Comment has been the home of independent film journalism for over 50 years, publishing in-depth interviews, critical analysis, and feature coverage of mainstream, art-house, and avant-garde filmmaking from around the world. Our podcast is a weekly space for critical conversation about film, with a look at topical issues, new releases, and the big picture. Film Comment is a nonprofit publication that relies on the support of readers. Support film culture and subscribe today.

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NYFF 2021: Silvan Zürcher & Alexandre Koberidze in Conversation

In an NYFF lineup with a record number of new and emerging filmmakers, Alexandre Koberidze?s What Do We See When We Look at the Sky? and Ramon and Silvan Zürcher?s The Girl and the Spider?both sophomore features?stood out for their sui generis approaches to cinematic narrative and form. Formally assured and intellectually audacious, the two films, in their own unique ways, electrify the quotidian with currents of desire, romance, and modern myth. During the festival last week, Film Comment Co-Deputy Editor Devika Girish sat down with Silvan Zürcher and Koberidze?who are old friends from their time together at the the renowned DFFB (the German Film and Television Academy Berlin)?for an in-depth talk. The conversation covered the two directors' filmic inspirations and aspirations, their trajectories within Swiss and Georgian cinema, the whimsical play with time and place in their movies, and much more. A special thanks to HBO, the presenting partner of all NYFF Talks.
2021-10-13
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NYFF 2021: The Velvet Underground & the New York Avant-Garde, ft. Todd Haynes, Amy Taubin, & others

Two films in this year?s NYFF lineup take us back to the ?60s heyday of the New York avant-garde: in the Main Slate, Todd Haynes?s The Velvet Underground offers a revelatory portrait of the milieu that gave rise to the eponymous band and its boundary-pushing music, while in Revivals, Ed Lachman?s Songs for Drella captures Lou Reed and John Cale in concert, paying tribute to the late Andy Warhol with riveting intimacy. On Sunday, October 3, Film Comment editor Devika Girish and Clinton Krute joined Haynes, Lachman, critic Amy Taubin, and the editors of The Velvet Underground, Affonso Gonçalvez and Adam Kurnitz, for a roundtable talk. In our wide-ranging conversation on the stage of Damrosch Park at Lincoln Center. We touched on the making of the two films, as well as the enduring legacy of the historic moment of artistic innovation they so vividly evoke. Stay tuned to filmcomment.com for more coverage of this year?s New York Film Festival, both on the podcast, and in the Film Comment Letter.
2021-10-05
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NYFF 2021: Joanna Hogg and Honor Swinton Byrne on The Souvenir Part II

This week we're reporting from the 59th New York Film Festival. One of the most anticipated films in this year's lineup is The Souvenir Part II?Joanna Hogg?s follow-up to her remarkable 2019 coming-of-age drama, The Souvenir. Following Honor Swinton Byrne?s Julie, a film student, in the aftermath of her boyfriend?s death-by-overdose, the new film deepens the predecessor?s exploration of the boundaries between art and life with tender reflection, wry humor, and some dazzling moments of meta-auto-fiction. We caught up with Joanna while she was in New York for the festival, while Honor joined the conversation from Edinburgh via Zoom. Our lively chat touched upon the film?s layered approach to autobiography, its precisely contrived naturalism, and how the film?s soundtrack draws from Hogg?s memories of youth.
2021-10-01
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NYFF 2021: Currents, with Chloe Lizotte and Ela Bittencourt

Established in 2020?and picking up where the late, lamented Projections section left off?Currents is the New York Film Festival's home for films with more offbeat, experimental, or hybrid sensibilities. This year?s lineup does not disappoint, with a selection of groundbreaking features and shorts from new and established filmmakers like Matías Piñeiro and Lois Patiño, Claire Simon, Kevin Jerome Everson, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, and many more. For this conversation I sat down with critics Chloe Lizotte and Ela Bittencourt to highlight some of our favorites from the section, including Miguel Gomes and Maureen Fazendeiro?s The Tsugua Diaries, Kiyoshi Sugita?s Haruhara-san?s Recorder, Kiro Russo?s El gran movimiento, and Ted Fendt?s Outside Noise, among other features and shorts. Stay tuned for more coverage of this year?s New York Film Festival, both on the podcast, and in the Film Comment Letter. https://www.filmcomment.com/newsletter-sign-up/
2021-09-28
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Toronto 2021 with Adam Nayman and José Teodoro

As we enter the thick of fall festival season, it seems that every week brings with it a full slate of amazing new films from all over the world. This week, Film Comment Editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute rang up two of their favorite critics, Adam Nayman and José Teodoro, for a look at the 2021 edition of Toronto International Film Festival, which just wrapped this past weekend. José and Adam had much to report on from their hometown fest. They kicked things off with a discussion of some of the bigger movies on offer, including Dune, Spencer, Jane Campion?s The Power of the Dog, and Terence Davies?s Benediction, before diving into films like Silent Land, Sundown, Bergman Island, and more.  And don?t miss José?s dispatch from TIFF in this week?s Film Comment Letter. Sign up today at filmcomment.com.
2021-09-21
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Terence Davies on Benediction and more

This week Film Comment is reporting from the Toronto International Film Festival, both virtually and in-person. One of the most anticipated films at this year?s festival is Benediction, the latest feature by British master Terence Davies. It?s a biopic of the English anti-war poet Siegfried Sassoon?although, biopic is a bit of a misnomer. Like A Quiet Passion, Davies?s 2015 film about Emily Dickinson, Benediction is a beautifully impressionistic, personal, and indeed poetic account of Sassoon's very colorful life. Davies jumps back and forth in time, melds archival footage and arch scenes of drama, and stages some stunning tableaux that tune us into the ups and downs of Sassoon?s life as a gay man, and the despair that haunted him and his poetry after his stint in World War I. Film Comment Co-Deputy Editor Devika Girish chatted with Davies about the film as well as an eclectic range of subjects: beauty, eternity, poetry, Catholicism, the power of silence, his experiences in the U.K?s gay scene, the horrors of reality television, and more. We hope you enjoy the conversation, and make sure you subscribe to the podcast and to the Film Comment Letter so you can keep up with all our upcoming Toronto coverage. This episode is sponsored by Kino Lorber, presenting Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Wife of a Spy, now in theaters: bit.ly/wifeofaspy
2021-09-14
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Spike Lee?s Documentaries with Amy Taubin and Ina Archer

In a 2007 Film Comment essay, Amy Taubin wrote in praise of Spike Lee?s When the Levees Broke, a documentary about the Hurricane Katrina disaster and the communities that bore its brunt. For Amy, ?Lee makes it possible for their stories to be inscribed in history. It is left to us not to forget them.? The same could be said of Lee?s epic new mini-series NYC Epicenters 9/11?2021½, a deep-dive into New York City?s recent history of trauma and resilience, from the September 11 attacks to the COVID-19 pandemic. On today?s podcast, FC editors Clinton Krute and Devika Girish sat down with Amy as well as critic, artist, and archivist Ina Archer to discuss the fascinating sprawl of the show, a highly personal tribute to the spirit of Lee?s hometown.
2021-09-09
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Smaller Festivals with Jordan Cronk

The summer and fall festival seasons bring a flurry of buzzy premieres at glamorous locales: Cannes, Venice, New York, Toronto. But as most film critics will attest, some of our best festival experiences are at the smaller venues and events that often fly under the radar. These include regional festivals that cater to local audiences, festivals that spotlight newer filmmakers, and lineups focused on specialized programs.  To discuss the role of these festivals and some selections from recent editions, Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute sat down with one of Film Comment?s most trusted festival correspondents?curator and critic Jordan Cronk. Jordan talked about some of his favorite small festivals, including Black Canvas, RIDM, and True/False, and discussed the prize-winners from the recent edition of FIDMarseille, including Outside Noise and Haruhara San?s Recorder. They also discussed picks from an upcoming archival film festival organized by Arsenal Berlin, and some of Jordan?s personal highlights from Locarno.
2021-08-31
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Sex Work in Cinema

On today?s podcast we?re talking about a long-running preoccupation of cinema: sex work. From Taxi Driver to Pretty Woman, sex workers have frequently appeared in the movies as both tragic and romantic figures, but rarely as, well, workers. Two recent releases offer a different, more complex perspective: Lizzie Borden?s 1986 cult classic Working Girls, which was restored and released in July, and Tsai Ming-liang?s latest feature, Days.  We sat down with critics So Mayer and Sarah Fonseca to talk about the ways in which these films reflect on questions of labor, representation, performance, and care. The conversation quickly branched out to many more films, including Leilah Weinraub?s Shakedown, Hou Hsiao-hsien?s Flowers of Shanghai, Antonio Pietrangeli?s Adua and Her Friends, Fassbinder?s Querelle, and others.
2021-08-17
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Ira Deutchman on Searching for Mr. Rugoff

This week?s podcast features a conversation with Ira Deutchman, the director of the new documentary, Searching for Mr. Rugoff. The film explores the life and work of the infamous movie-theater impresario Don Rugoff. In a 1975 Film Comment profile, Stuart Byron writes that Rugoff might be best remembered as the man who "made Manhattan's Upper East Side rather than Times Square the prime area for motion picture exhibition in New York, substituted Colombian coffee for popcorn, and?to the chagrin of critics like Andrew Sarris and the delight of those like John Simon?turned 'movies' into 'films.'" Ira, a longtime producer and distributor, has a secret Film Comment connection: in the '90s, he penned the magazine?s anonymous industry column, Grosses Gloss. To pick Ira?s brain about his days working for Rugoff, his extensive knowledge of the New York City exhibition landscape, and the transformation of the indie business over the last half century, we invited a special guest host: Film Comment publisher and industry veteran Eugene Hernandez.
2021-08-10
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Summer 2021 Rep Report, with Abby Sun and Steve MacFarlane

As the dog days of summer loom, we?ve been pining for the crisp, air-conditioned darkness of the cinema. Fortunately, as theaters across the country have begun to re-open, seeing a favorite old movie in the dark, with other people, is no longer a distant dream. For this week?s podcast, FC Co-Deputy Editor Clinton Krute sat down with two programmers and writers, Abby Sun and Steve Macfarlane, for wide-ranging conversation about the current repertory landscape?about what?s changed over the past year, for the better and for the worse, and where things might be headed in the near future. They discuss the rapid evolution and proliferation of virtual rep offerings during the pandemic, as well as the programming of the latest Flaherty Seminar and several choice offerings at Film Forum and elsewhere.
2021-08-03
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Cannes #2, with Miriam Bale and Jonathan Romney

After a Cannes-less 2020, we were glad to welcome back cinema?s grandest event this year. Film Comment followed the much-awaited 2021 edition?s superb lineup with the help of an on-the-Croisette crew of contributors?you can read their thoughtful dispatches and interviews here. On today?s podcast?the second of an epic two-parter?Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute welcomed FC contributing editor Jonathan Romney and critic and programmer Miriam Bale to talk about some of the festival?s biggest films. They dug into Memoria, Annette, Drive My Car, The Souvenir Part II, Bergman Island, Vortex, and more. Don?t miss the first part of the conversation, covering Julia Ducournau?s Palme d?Or?winner Titane, Bruno Dumont?s France, Paul Verhoeven?s Benedetta, Sean Baker?s Red Rocket, and more: https://www.filmcomment.com/blog/the-film-comment-podcast-cannes-2021-part-1-jonathan-romney-miriam-bale-titane-julia-ducournau/
2021-07-21
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Cannes 2021 # 1, with Miriam Bale and Jonathan Romney

After a Cannes-less 2020, we were glad to welcome back cinema?s grandest event. Film Comment followed the festival?s stellar lineup with the help of an on-the-Croisette crew of contributors. On today?s podcast?the first of an epic two-parter?Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute welcomed FC contributing editor Jonathan Romney and critic and programmer Miriam Bale to dish on some of their festival viewing. They talked about Julia Ducournau?s Palme d?Or -winner Titane, Bruno Dumont?s France, Paul Verhoeven?s Benedetta, Compartment No. 6, Red Rocket, La Fracture, Lingui, the Sacred Bonds, and more. Stay tuned for part two of the conversation, covering Annette, Memoria, The Souvenir Part II, and many more.
2021-07-20
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Happy Birthday, America! with A. S. Hamrah

As the good old U. S. of A. celebrated yet another year around the sun, Film Comment editors Clinton Krute and Devika Girish invited critic A.S. Hamrah to hold forth on the varied, colorful, and often bleak visions of America on the screen. They asked him to pick some movies that evoked the stars and stripes, or the spirit of ?76, and Scott responded with 13 picks?one for each of the original colonies.  Each one of Scott's choices?which include The Wolf of Wall Street, Kajillionaire, Good Time, Leave No Trace, Class Relations, and Trash Humpers?sparked a spirited conversation about the state of the nation. Devika and Clint added in some of their own picks: John Sayles?s The Brother From Another Planet, Lizzie Borden?s Born in Flames, and more. See the full list of movies in the show notes at https://www.filmcomment.com/blog/the-film-comment-podcast-happy-birthday-america-a-s-hamrah/
2021-07-07
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James Benning?s Ten Skies with Erika Balsom

In the introduction to her new book on James Benning?s 2004 film, Ten Skies, critic and scholar Erika Balsom writes: ?there are films that present themselves as complex objects but which are in fact quite simple ? And then there are films?rarer altogether?that appear simple but harbour tremendous complexity. Such is the deception, the allure, of Ten Skies?a film messier and more profuse than my immediate love for it had allowed.? Balsom joined me to talk about the book (out now from Fireflies Press) and the many-sided approach she took to writing about one of the most deceptively simple?and beautiful?films in Benning?s fantastically varied body of work. We also discussed where Ten Skies fits into his filmography, the ways in which Benning plays with his own identity, how ten static shots of clouds can be a powerful political statement, and much more. Balsom will introduce a screening of Ten Skies at Light Industry in Brooklyn on July 1.
2021-06-29
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New Red Order

A couple weeks ago, I (Devika) visited the Artists Space gallery in downtown Manhattan to check out the ongoing exhibit, "Feel at Home Here," by New Red Order?a ?public secret society? with rotating members who creates exhibitions, videos, and performances that question and re-channel our relationships to indigeneity. As I walked into the gallery, the lobby welcomed me with an assortment of marketing paraphernalia: a poster advertised ?Savage Philosophy??; a red landline invited me to call a hotline; and a screen played a video of a white man exhorting me to ?never settle? and to realize my "fullest potential? by joining his organization, New Red Order.  Was this the merchandise section of the gallery? A marketing or recruitment video? Or a parody? I couldn?t quite tell at first. This slippage between satire and fact, which constantly reminds us of the all-too-real absurdity of the settler colonial project, is the modus operandi of New Red Order. As I walked further into the exhibit, one wall featured a sardonic timeline of the history of the Improved Order of Red Men, a whites-only political society that New Red Order riffs on subversively. One section of the room was modeled as a real-estate office for ?Giving Back?" land. And the centerpiece featured a rotating video installation, which included New Red Order?s ongoing feature-film-slash-recruitment-campaign, Never Settle. To dig into the exhibit?s provocative plays with time, futurity, guilt, ownership, and desire, I spoke to New Red Order?s ?core contributors," as they describe themselves: Jackson Polys, Adam Khalil, and Zack Khalil. Today?s podcast presents a short excerpt of our conversation, featuring Adam and Jackson, but look out for the full interview in the Film Comment Letter on Thursday, June 24. For show notes, go filmcomment.com/blog/the-film-comment-podcast-new-red-order
2021-06-22
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Movie Doubles with K. Austin Collins and Mayukh Sen

This week, we sat down with critics K. Austin Collins and Mayukh Sen?to talk about one of the most enduring motifs in movie history: the double.  We delved into a hand-picked selection of mirroring movies, including Brian de Palma?s underrated Femme Fatale, Susan Seidelman?s Desperately Seeking Susan, Carlos Saura?s Peppermint Frappé, and Bimal Roy?s Madhumati, a film released the same year as?and with some eerie similarities to?that urtext of double features, Hitchcock?s Vertigo.  As we discovered, doubles, mirrors, and dubious impersonators can be found in nearly every era and genre of cinema, with the trope generating an apparently endless variety of themes, narrative forms, and interpretations.
2021-06-15
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NYFF58 Redux with Dan Sullivan and Steve Macfarlane

Last year?s hybrid New York Film Festival was an oasis amid the movie desert of the pandemic, but we sorely missed seeing the selections in the dark of Film at Lincoln Center?s theaters. So we were overjoyed when a ?redux? version of the festival was announced for this summer, with much of the 2020 lineup playing on the big screen. To dig into the highlights of this encore edition and the films that must be seen big (or seen again,) we sat down with FLC programmer Dan Sullivan and curator and critic Steve Macfarlane. We discussed some underseen gems from the Revivals section, including William Klein?s Muhammad Ali: The Greatest and Marie-Claude Treilhou?s Simone Barbes or Virtue, and went long on Paul Felten and Joe DeNardo?s Slow Machine and some standout episodes from Steve McQueen?s Small Axe anthology.
2021-06-09
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Homework, with Nellie Killian and Ina Archer

This week on the podcast, Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute went to school with two learned FC veterans: Nellie Killian, curator and FC contributing editor, and Ina Archer, artist, critic, and media preservationist at the National Museum of African-American History & Culture. Each of them assigned the group a movie to watch. We?re calling this episode ?homework,? but fear not, their selections were far from a chore!  Ina selected Murder at the Vanities (1934), Mitchell Leisen?s madcap Pre-Code caper, while Nellie suggested Honey Moccasin, a 1998 experimental gem by Indigenous filmmaker Shelley Niro. Both selections were zany, incredibly inventive, and very much of their times. They made for a great double feature. We learned a lot from the conversation and hope you will, too. Pop quiz coming up soon! For links to the films and more, go to the show notes at https://www.filmcomment.com/blog/the-film-comment-podcast-homework/
2021-06-01
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At Home, Palestinian Cinema Edition with Kaleem Hawa

In an essay on the militant films of the Palestine Film Unit for The New York Review of Books, the critic Kaleem Hawa writes that, ?Palestinian cinema has always been saddled with the psychic weight of colonization. (...) Film offers liberatory possibilities, then: with the projection of moving images onto a screen, a people can imagine something different, something other.? This week on the podcast, FC editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute sat down with Kaleem (who?s also a Film Comment contributor) to discuss our recent home-viewing?which, as it turned out, included a lot of Palestinian cinema. From the agit-prop of Mustafa Abu Ali?s 1974 film They Do Not Exist, to the diasporic longing of Basma AlSharif?s Home Movies Gaza, to the biting satire and media criticism of Elia Suleiman, our conversation covered a lot of fascinating ground. Links to the movies are in our show notes at https://www.filmcomment.com/blog/the-film-comment-podcast-at-home-palestinian-cinema-edition/.
2021-05-25
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Barry Jenkins on The Underground Railroad

On this week?s podcast, Film Comment editors Clinton Krute and Devika Girish speak to Barry Jenkins, Oscar-winning director of Moonlight and If Beale Street Could Talk, about his latest project, The Underground Railroad. It?s a lush, 10-hour epic that marries Jenkins?s distinctive cinematic sensibilities with the historical fiction of Colson Whitehead?s Pulitzer Prize?winning novel, which imagines the underground railroad as a real-life network of trains and tunnels. Over 10 episodes, all directed by Jenkins, the show traces the odyssey of a young enslaved woman named Cora after her escape from a plantation in antebellum Georgia. As Cora is pursued from state to state by a seemingly possessed slave catcher, Jenkins combines bracing and often brutal realism with moments of thrilling fantasy and beauty. Film Comment sat down with Jenkins to discuss five key scenes from the series, and the ideas and intricate craft that went into each. Listeners beware! The conversation touches on crucial plot points, so if you're averse to spoilers, please press pause and watch the series first.
2021-05-18
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The Maverick Movies of Melvin Van Peebles

This week on the podcast, we went long on an American filmmaker like no other: Melvin Van Peebles. Known for groundbreaking classics like Watermelon Man and Sweet Sweetback?s Baadassss Song, Van Peebles invented entirely new cinematic languages while offering trenchant visions of Black American life and masculinity. In 1968, the director made his feature debut with The Story of a Three Day Pass, a dazzlingly multi-layered film about an African-American soldier?s dalliance with a white French woman in Paris. With the film returning to screens this week in a brand-new restoration, we reached out to two Van Peebles superfans: filmmaker Ephraim Asili, director of The Inheritance, and writer and film editor Blair McClendon. We discussed Van Peebles' work and fascinating life, and even got a peek into Ephraim?s extensive collection of Melvin Van Peebles ephemera. Don?t forget to sign up for the Film Comment Letter! It?s a free digital newsletter that will deliver original writing by Film Comment contributors directly to your inbox every Thursday. Sign-up today at filmcomment.com.
2021-05-11
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Roy Andersson?s About Endlessness

?The people are all pale as mushrooms, blending in with the ashen cityscapes, sterile white rooms, and drab, half-empty restaurants. Stuck in meticulously composed dioramas, they enact miniature comedies and tragedies?sometimes it is hard to say which?filled with deadpan humor and haunting bleakness. We could only be in a Roy Andersson movie.? Imogen Sara Smith wrote these words about Andersson?s latest, About Endlessness, which graced the cover of Film Comment?s May-June 2020 issue. The global pandemic was just starting to take hold back then, and the Swedish filmmaker?s work seemed to offer an uncannily apt vision of life in 2020. With About Endlessness finally opening in theaters, FC editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute welcomed Imogen and another long-time FC contributor, Jonathan Romney, for a conversation about the film and its place in Andersson?s utterly distinctive filmography. Don?t forget to sign up for the Film Comment Letter, launching on May 6! It?s a free digital newsletter that will deliver original writing by Film Comment contributors directly to your inbox every Thursday. Sign-up today at filmcomment.com and receive a free digital download of a Film Comment back issue of your choice.
2021-05-04
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New Directors/New Films 2021 Critics? Preview

This last year has been a drought for movie-lovers by most standards. But if you?re looking for silver linings, you could do worse than noting that there?s a fresh edition of the New Directors/New Films festival happening a mere four months after the 2020 edition. This year is extra special: it returns the festival to theaters alongside virtual screenings, and it also marks the 50th anniversary of New Directors/New Films. It?s a nice reminder that despite all the doom-saying, cinema?s future remains as vibrant as its past. To preview the lineup, FC editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute were joined by critics Vadim Rizov and Chloe Lizotte?both veterans of our 2020 New Directors talk? for a live taping of the podcast. The four discussed festival highlights including Amalia Ulman?s El Planeta, James Vaughan?s Friends and Strangers, Fern Silva?s Rock Bottom Riser, Salomé Jashi?s Taming the Garden, Mani Kaul's Duvidha, and more. This episode of the Film Comment Podcast is sponsored by MUBI. Film Comment readers and listeners can get 30 days of great cinema free at mubi.com/filmcomment.
2021-04-27
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Trans Cinema Roundtable

?A film that centers on a transgender person or storyline enters the culture like any other movie. The difference lies in the discourse around it.? So writes Caden Mark Gardner in a recent essay in the Criterion Collection?s online publication, the Current. ?Trans people in movies are written and talked about as if they were abstract concepts, anomalies. For years, it?s been clear that very little attention is being paid (by filmmakers, critics, or marketers) to the ways in which a trans audience might see and react to these attempts at putting their lives in front of the camera, and the cisgender majority continues to control the conversation.? On this week's episode, Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute brought together a roundtable of writers and artists who are reframing this conversation: critics Caden and Willow Maclay, and filmmakers Isabel Sandoval and Jessica Dunn Rovinelli. We asked the panel to respond to a number of excellent questions submitted by the Film Comment community, including: How does one define trans cinema? Are visibility and representation important, or should questions of labor be foregrounded? And which classic movies do our panelists consider to be ?covertly? trans? The rich and wide-ranging conversation touched upon a number of movies and articles. For show notes, go to filmcomment.com/blog/the-film-comment-podcast-trans-cinema-roundtable. This episode of the Film Comment Podcast is sponsored by MUBI. Film Comment readers and listeners can get 30 days of great cinema free at mubi.com/filmcomment.
2021-04-20
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At Home, Oscars Edition with A.S. Hamrah and Blair McClendon

On this week's episode, editors Clinton Krute and Devika Girish were joined two excellent writers, both first-timers on the Film Comment Podcast: A. S. Hamrah, film critic at The Baffler, and writer and film editor Blair McClendon, whom you may know from his work on 2020's The Assistant. The original plan was to chat about our recent home viewing, but the conversation kept returning to that age-old fountain of springtime small talk: the Academy Awards. The group focused on a handful of notable nominees?Sound of Metal, Minari, Judas and the Black Messiah, and Nomadland, among others?and also dug into the massive Oscars marketing apparatus, ?90s zine culture, the phenomenon of professional ?Oscarologists,? and much, much more. To top it off, the discussion was interrupted by a brief visit from New York?s finest. Fear not! Everyone is safe. Though Margaret, if you?re listening, please be advised. This episode of the Film Comment Podcast is sponsored by: Amazon Studios, presenting Sound of Metal and One Night in Miami. Now streaming on Amazon Prime Video. For your consideration. Learn more here: amazonstudiosguilds.com/films Kino Lorber, presenting Charlène Favier's Slalom. Now playing in select theaters and virtual cinemas nationwide: kinomarquee.com/slalom
2021-04-13
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Raoul Peck on Exterminate All the Brutes

For years, Haitian filmmaker Raoul Peck has been crafting eloquent correctives to Eurocentric and capitalist histories through acclaimed films like Lumumba (2000), I Am Not Your Negro (2016), and The Young Karl Marx (2017). His latest opus takes that project to its limit: Exterminate All the Brutes is a four-part HBO documentary series that retells the story of our world from a perspective rarely centered in such narratives?that of the colonized. Drawing from three books?Exterminate All the Brutes by Sven Lindqvist, which borrows its title from Joseph Conrad?s Heart of Darkness; An Indigenous Peoples? History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz; and Silencing the Past by Haitian-American scholar Michel-Rolph Trouillot?Peck crafts a sweeping historical documentary that feels at once intimate and sweeping, familiar and new. In this episode of the podcast, Film Comment editor Devika Girish chatted at length with Peck about assembling this expansive series, confronting the gaps in colonial archives, and drawing continuities with the contemporary crises of fake news and historical amnesia. Listen to the full conversation and read an excerpt on filmcomment.com. This episode of the Film Comment Podcast is sponsored by: - MUBI. Film Comment readers and listeners can get 30 days of great cinema free at mubi.com/filmcomment. - Amazon Studios, presenting Borat Subsequent Moviefilm and Time. Now streaming on Amazon Prime Video. For your consideration. Learn more at amazonstudiosguilds.com/films.
2021-04-06
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Adam Curtis's Can't Get You Out of My Head

A few weeks ago, the British documentarian Adam Curtis debuted his newest mega-project online: a six-episode, eight-hour BBC series titled, Can?t Get You Out of My Head: An Emotional History of the Modern World. It's the latest in Curtis?s 30-year run of documentaries that stitch together found footage drawn largely from the BBC?s archives into epic origin stories of our political and cultural times. Available in its entirety on YouTube, Can?t Get You Out of My Head traces associative connections between a number of figures across history?including Jiang Qing, Michael X, Afeni and Tupac Shakur, Edouard Limonov, and others?to craft a dizzying account of the emergence of the global economy, the rise of individualism, and the spread of conspiracy theories. In this week's episode, Film Comment editors Clinton Krute and Devika Girish debate Curtis?s aesthetic strategies and political arguments with two old friends: Film at Lincoln Center assistant programmer Dan Sullivan, and Violet Lucca, a former Film Comment editor (and the original host of this podcast!) who now works as web editor at Harper?s Magazine. They take on a number of questions in a lively, often impassioned conversation. Is Curtis a journalist, a filmmaker, or a propagandist? Who is the audience for his films? Do his grand theories hold water? And much more. For show notes, go to filmcomment.com/blog/the-film-comment-podcast-cant-get-you-out-of-my-head. This episode of the Film Comment Podcast is sponsored by MUBI. Film Comment readers and listeners can get 30 days of great cinema free at mubi.com/filmcomment.
2021-03-30
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The Return of Movie Gifts with K. Austin Collins and Adam Nayman

On this week's episode, we bring back a beloved Film Comment Podcast format of yore: Movie Gifts. It?s like Secret Santa but for movies?each participant picks a movie for another that the recipient hasn?t seen. It?s a fun way for us to share our enthusiasms, gain new insights on old favorites, and fill in some long-standing blindspots.  And who better to join us in the spirit of gift-giving than our two erudite guests: K. Austin Collins, film critic for Rolling Stone; and Adam Nayman, writer for The Ringer, contributing editor to CinemaScope, and author of Paul Thomas Anderson: Masterworks. Kameron and Adam joined Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute to unwrap some fantastic presents, including Cinda Firestone's Attica, Allan King's Warrendale, Abbas Kiarostami's First Case, Second Case, and Elaine May's A New Leaf. For show notes, go to filmcomment.com/blog/the-film-comment-podcast-the-return-of-movie-gifts. This episode of the Film Comment Podcast is sponsored by MUBI. Film Comment readers and listeners can get 30 days of great cinema free at mubi.com/filmcomment.
2021-03-23
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Virtual Festivals with Abby Sun and Jessica Kiang

In case you missed the exciting news: we just relaunched the Film Comment Podcast last week after a yearlong hiatus. We?re glad to be back, and in this episode, we?re looking at one of the big developments that the film world has grappled with while we were away: the emergence of virtual film festivals. As the pandemic shut down cinemas and made travel impossible, festivals adopted a variety of strategies to keep bringing movies to their audiences. Some, like Cannes, were cancelled; others went fully online; and many, like the New York Film Festival, Sundance, and the Berlinale, experimented with hybrid formats. These new models have opened up a host of questions. Is it really a festival if you?re not in a cinema? What does the virtual format expose about the mechanics of festivals? And as theaters start to reopen, are these changes here to stay? In this episode, Film Comment editors Clinton Krute and Devika Girish invited two festival veterans?curator Abby Sun (DocYard; My Sight Is Lined With Visions), and critic Jessica Kiang (Variety, The Playlist)?to dig into these questions and more. This episode of the Film Comment Podcast is sponsored by MUBI. Film Comment readers and listeners can get 30 days of great cinema free at mubi.com/filmcomment.
2021-03-16
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Berlinale 2021 Wrap

Welcome back to the Film Comment Podcast. After a months-long hiatus prompted by the Covid-19 pandemic, we are thrilled to kick off the return of Film Comment with one of our favorite ways to connect with our audience: our weekly podcast. We've missed talking about movies with our whip-smart friends and fellow critics, and we're excited to be back here, bringing you insightful commentary on the latest in film culture. Check this space every Tuesday for new episodes. For our first new episode, we delved into the lineup of the 2021 Berlinale. Like several other festivals, this year?s edition is taking a hybrid approach, with two staggered parts?a virtual Industry Event, which took place March 1-5, and an in-person event scheduled for June. To dig into some highlights from the (very strong) slate screened online last week, Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute were joined by two of our favorite critics: scholar Erika Balsom, who writes for Artforum, CinemaScope, and other publications, and Ela Bittencourt, a longtime Film Comment contributor. They discussed Alexandre Koberidze?s What Do We See When We Look at the Sky, Ramon and Silvan Zürcher?s The Girl and the Spider, Radu Jude?s Golden Bear-winner Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn, Celine Sciamma?s highly anticipated Petite Maman, and Ryûsuke Hamaguchi?s Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy, among other films.
2021-03-10
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At Home #16: Devika Girish and Clinton Krute

It?s been a while since we did a new episode in our Film Comment Podcast: at Home series. Let me assure you that?s not because we?ve stopped watching movies or even left the house for that matter. So FC Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold got together again with my colleagues to talk about the latest selection of home viewing that?s been occupying our pandemicized brains. We discussed the shock of the present moment and how it?s changed, and then we talked about movies spanning cinema verite and what used to be called cyberspace, as well as a fair share of animals on screen. I was joined by all-star Film Comment editorial colleagues: Film Comment Digital Editor Clinton Krute and Assistant Editor Devika Girish. We discuss films like the Maysles Brothers? Salesman, Hong Sangsoo?s Tale of Cinema, The Matrix, Greg Mottola?s The Daytrippers, Mike Nichols? The Day of the Dolphin, Roar, and, um, Tiger King, among others. Stay safe, and thank you for all of your support. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-04-24
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At Home #15 - Ashley Clark and Eric Hynes

In more normal times, this week?s podcast might have been a Rep Report, reviewing some of the riches screening in New York?s art-house theaters. I?ve spent more happy hours than I could possibly count at those theaters, with certain years defined by landmark retrospectives and rare screenings of one sort or another. Film Comment has been lucky to count many of the programmers at these theaters as contributors to the magazine and the podcast. And so for our latest episode, FC Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold checks in with two keepers of the flame: Eric Hynes, curator at Museum of the Moving Image, and writer of our Make It Real column on nonfiction; and Ashley Clark, director of film programming at BAM in Brooklyn. The three talk about steering theaters through this difficult time, and the movies and the 25-year-old baseball games that have kept them in good spirits. And fair warning: there is talk about Tron. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-04-13
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At Home #14 - Critics David Bordwell and Imogen Sara Smith

We?re always happy to welcome two outstanding scholars to the Film Comment Podcast, and you?ve probably already read their criticism or heard them on a DVD or streaming commentary. David Bordwell last joined us to discuss his book Reinventing Hollywood, and of course his books are staples of film studies courses and his regular film blog with Kristin Thompson is a sharp and inquisitive resource. Critic Imogen Sara Smith is our other returning guest, a regular contributor to Film Comment and an all-star contributor at Criterion and elsewhere. Among her beautifully composed and observed essays, she?s written about Christian Petzold for us and on the podcast, reflected on the phenomenon of ghosts in cinema. Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold welcomed David and Imogen back for a discussion that ranges from fascinating rediscoveries in Japanese cinema to the inflammatory film The Hunt. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-04-08
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At Home #13 - The Cinema Worker Solidarity Fund?s Nellie Killian and Ed Halter

An inspiring development during the pandemic has been watching people pull together to help one another and especially those hit hardest. One such effort was the Cinema Worker Solidarity Fund, which raised nearly $80,000 in 10 days for out-of-work movie theater employees. For our latest edition of The Film Comment Podcast at Home, Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold caught up with programmer-critics Ed Halter and Nellie Killian, who spearheaded the Cinema Worker Solidarity Fund alongside Thomas Beard and filmmaker Sierra Pettengill. Halter, a critic in residence at Bard College, is also co-curator of Light Industry with Thomas Beard, and Killian is a contributing editor of Film Comment. Halter and Killian last appeared together on an incredible podcast talking about Projections, the experimental film slate of the New York Film Festival. This time, the three talked about the effects of the crisis on how we watch movies, what we?ve been watching, and the interesting overlaps between our ultra-mediated existence and experimental cinema. Films discussed include Claude Lanzmann?s Shoah, Listen to Britain, Fail Safe, The Day After, and more. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-04-07
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At Home #12 - Critic Jonathan Romney

We begin another week with The Film Comment Podcast at Home, keeping ourselves distracted and hopefully our listeners too. One big way the crisis is affecting the movie business is that it?s also another week without new theatrical releases. That might be the least of our concerns, but it?s definitely been food for thought among critics and other moviegoers. On this episode, Film Comment Editor-in-Chief talked to our weekly critic, Jonathan Romney, who has been adapting his output for the current situation, and that goes for his intake. Nic reached him in London, where he?s weathering the crisis at home like the rest of us with a liberal mix of movies and television. The two discuss Sergei Loznitsa's My Joy, Bojack Horseman, The Larry Sanders Show, Babylon Berlin, and Zia Anger's My First Film, among others. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-04-06
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True/False Film Fest 2020

Right now, movie theaters are temporarily closed, and we?ll have to wait a while before we can all sit together again and look up at the big screen. But before the curtain dropped on moviegoing, Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold made his annual pilgrimage to the True/False Film Fest. True/False is a reliably energizing festival of nonfiction film, curating the best from around the world. It?s also a place to take the Film Comment Podcast on the road, taking part in Toasted, the late-night event that closes out the festival. This year, Rapold spoke with another rotating lineup of filmmakers, critics, and film professionals, about movies at the festival as well as the nitty-gritty of filmmaking and working with people in front of and behind the camera. Among the films discussed are Garrett Bradley?s Time; Khalik Allah?s IWOW I Walk on Water; Ra?anan Alexandrowicz?s The Viewing Booth; Daniel Hymanson?s So Late So Soon; and Sky Hopinka?s Malni: Towards the Ocean, Towards the Shore. Rapold was joined by an ever-changing lineup including Hymanson and Hopinka, critic Dessane Lopez Cassell, filmmaker Mustafa Rony Zeno, and more. Finally Please bear in mind that this was recorded before a live audience at Cafe Berlin. Special thanks to Em Downing of True/False for keeping the show running. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-04-02
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At Home #11 - Critic Ela Bittencourt

Staying at home is a global phenomenon in these difficult times, as we all find ourselves with a lot more indoors time and anxiety on our hands. For our latest daily edition of Film Comment Podcast at Home, we go to Brazil. Critic and programmer Ela Bittencourt wrote our interview feature on Bacurau in our March-April issue, and now, the film?s story of collective action, state of siege, and inequality feel ever more urgent. Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold and Assistant Editor Devika Girish talked about the situation in Brazil and also what Ela has been watching. In addition to Bacurau, we also discuss Bong Joon-ho?s Parasite, Joseph Losey?s The Servant and Mr. Klein, Satyajit Ray?s Pather Panchali, Mani Kaul?s Our Daily Bread, and Jia Zhangke?s Ash Is Purest White. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-03-31
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At Home #10 - Synonyms?s Nadav Lapid

For our latest daily edition of the podcast, we reached out again to a filmmaker for a report from another corner of the world. Nadav Lapid is the director of The Kindergarten Teacher, The Policeman, and most recently, Synonyms, which played in The New York Film Festival and before that won the top prize at Berlin. Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold interviewed Nadav about The Kindergarten Teacher at its premiere in Cannes, and in our July-August 2019 issue, the director sat down with Jordan Cronk for a conversation about Synonyms. The filmmaker spoke to us from Tel Aviv this time about working on his next feature under the current circumstances, and a couple of movies that came to mind in the process. I was joined by Devika Girish, assistant editor. And as we enter another week of the pandemic, we hope that all of our listeners are staying safe. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-03-30
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At Home #9 - New York Times Critic Manohla Dargis

In an article in The New York Times, the critic Manohla Dargis wrote about what we?re missing right now: ?There is nothing like watching a movie, leaving the world while being rooted in it alongside friends, family and everyone else.? It?s a feeling that means so much to all of us, and on this podcast, we?ve been doing our best to stay virtually connected with each other and with movies. We?ve had the pleasure of welcoming Manohla Dargis on the podcast in our festival editions, and in these extraordinary times, she joins us once again. For this episode, Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold and Assistant Editor Devika Girish talked to Manohla about the impact of the cinema shutdown, what?s unique about the movies, and why old Hollywood movies can hold a special pleasure. We discuss Hollywood classics like 42nd Street and The Great McGinty as well as more recent films including Bong Joon Ho?s Okja and Sudanese documentary Talking About Trees. Please note that our necessarily remote connection may mean some variable audio quality If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-03-27
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At Home #8 - Film at Lincoln Center and NYFF?s Eugene Hernandez

On the past few episodes we?ve posed the same essential question to critics, a filmmaker, and a curator: what?s the view from where you?re sitting? That?s come to mean a couple of things: what are you watching these days, but also what?s life like from your perspective of the film world? For this installment, we looked within our own organization, Film at Lincoln Center, and spoke with our colleague, Eugene Hernandez. Eugene is the deputy executive director at Film at Lincoln Center, director of the New York Film Festival, and publisher of Film Comment. FC Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold joined Clinton Krute and Devika Girish to talk with Eugene about his observations on our film community in these troubled times. And of course, we also discussed the movies we?ve been watching, including Jacques Tati?s Playtime, Norman Jewison?s Moonstruck, Robert Smigel?s The Week Of, and Martin Scorsese?s Alice Doesn?t Live Here Anymore. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-03-26
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At Home #7 - Nick Pinkerton on Buñuel, Godzilla, baseball, and more

Last weekend, the box office report for new releases looked very different: it was glaringly empty. As with so much of the world, the pandemic has left its mark on film: for now, new theatrical releases are in a kind of holding pattern. Our latest guest on The Film Comment Podcast at Home series is regular contributor Nick Pinkerton, and he?s been wondering how this cinematic break is affecting film culture and the very idea of contemporary cinema. Nick has also been watching a ton of movies, everything from Bunuel?s Simon of the Desert to Virtuosity. For this episode, FC Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold and Assistant Editor Devika Girish spoke with Nick about his voracious viewing and what isolation means for all of us as moviegoers with no place to go. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: https://purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-03-25
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At Home #6 - MoMA?s Rajendra Roy

Every year, the New Directors/New Films festival introduces audiences to fresh and adventurous cinema from around the world. It?s presented by Film at Lincoln Center and the Museum of Modern Art, and for many New York moviegoers, it?s a lovely prelude to the spring. This year, the 49th edition has been postponed, and so we thought it would be nice to sit down with MoMA?s chief curator of film, Rajendra Roy, for another installment in the Film Comment Podcast: At Home. We talked about a couple of Raj?s comfort food movies?including David Lynch?s Dune and Joseph L. Mankiewicz?s All About Eve?and we also discussed how an institution like MoMA plans to adapt its film programming to the current moment. Also joining FC Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold were Clinton Krute, FC digital editor, and FC Devika Girish, assistant editor. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: https://purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-03-24
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At Home #5 - Sandi Tan on Mauvais sang

For the past week we?ve been doing a special daily edition of the podcast where we talk about what we?ve been watching at home. It?s a new week now and the world still seems to get a bit scarier every day, so we?re going to keep doing this to distract anyone who needs distraction. For this episode, Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold was joined by Assistant Editor Devika Girish, Digital Editor Clinton Krute, and a very special guest: Los Angeles-based filmmaker and novelist Sandi Tan, director of Shirkers. We were pleased to welcome Sandi for a Film Comment Talk when Shirkers came out, and this time around, we had a terrific time discussing a number of great movies. We started with one agreed upon title, Leos Carax?s Mauvais Sang, starring Denis Lavant and Juliette Binoche, and ranged on from Zodiac to Fellini?s Roma. If you?re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: https://purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2
2020-03-23
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At Home #4 - Jean Arthur

In case you?re just joining us, this is another edition of the Film Comment Podcast at Home. Every day we?re talking about what we?re watching. For this episode, we check in with Sheila O?Malley, one of our regular columnists, who writes the Present Tense column. FC Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold joined digital editor Clinton Krute to talk with Sheila about a classic Hollywood star she?s been returning to: Jean Arthur, well known from several Frank Capra movies as well as Howard Hawks?s Only Angels Have Wings. Sheila also chose another film which we don?t want to spoil because it testifies to the great variety of movies we?re all watching right now. As usual, we?re providing links on Film Comment?s website, including where to watch the next movie we?ll focus on next episode: we?ll be talking about Leos Carax?s Mauvais Sang, starring Juliette Binoche and Denis Levant. And we?ll have a very special guest joining us that episode, posting Monday. You?ll also find more information and a link for supporting the publisher of Film Comment, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times. Also don?t miss details on the new streaming availability of Bacurau. Thank you for listening, and let?s go now to our conversation with Sheila and Clint.
2020-03-20
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At Home #3 - Kathleen Collins?s Losing Ground

Today we continue our special homebound version of the podcast, as we all do our best to stay connected and stay sane. As before, we?re talking about what we?ve been watching and how being stuck at home is leading us to try some new movies as well as return to comfort food. We hope you enjoy our latest selection, and we'd love if you watched along with us?you'll find links below to titles under discussion. For our latest episode, I?m joined by Soraya Nadia McDonald, culture critic for The Undefeated and contributing editor to Film Comment, and by Devika Girish, our assistant editor. On this episode, we discuss Kathleen Collins?s Losing Ground, Matt Wolf?s Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project, Thomas Heise?s Heimat Is a Space in Time, Legally Blonde, and Whatever Happened to Interracial Love? Also, a special treat: If you listened to the last episode, you?ll recall our own Michael Koresky promising some new music for the podcast. He came through with a dramatic performance of Michel Legrand?s ?What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life??, which you can hear on today?s intro.
2020-03-19
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At Home #2 - Vertigo and The Green Fog

?NO NEW ?MOVIES? TIL INFLUENZA ENDS? read the October 10, 1918, headline in The New York Times, during the global flu pandemic one century ago. Then as now, theaters nationwide were temporarily closing, leaving moviegoers without any movies to go to. ?WE MISS OUR MOVIES? went another newspaper headline that same October, atop an article that marveled at the impact of this young popular art form: ?In a few years, and so gradually as to be almost imperceptible, the custom of watching them has grown upon individuals of all mentalities to a greater extent than they realized until they suddenly were deprived of them.? The ?movies? are a bit more familiar now, but we?re definitely feeling deprived of moviegoing, the community that cinemas provide, and, well, just plain getting out of the house and seeing people. So we?ve begun our Film Comment Podcast at Home series, gathering together (remotely!) to talk about the movies we?re watching at home. While we can?t do anything about the stir-craziness, or the dread, we can at least share movies and keep each other company. Without further ado, please enjoy our latest installment, where I?m joined by Film Comment critical stalwart, Michael Koresky, and my editorial colleagues at the magazine, Devika Girish and Clinton Krute. We hope you?ll follow along and watch with us. On this episode, we discuss Desperately Seeking Susan, After Hours, Columbo, The Big City, Stuff and Dough, The Green Fog, Vertigo, Crimes of the Heart, The Truth, If We Say That We Are Friends, Ridge and more.
2020-03-18
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At Home #1 - V?ra Chytilová?s Daisies and more

You don?t need us to tell you that we?re living in extraordinary times, and consequently, many of us are spending our time indoors these days. And with all that extra time inside, we?ve been talking with folks and hearing that it might be nice to listen to some friendly talk about movies?and maybe give us something else to think about. So we will be doing special editions of The Film Comment Podcast where we talk about what we?ve been watching, and wherever possible, we?ll be providing relevant links so you can watch too or read more. Call it The Film Comment Podcast at Home. For our first installment, Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold sat down with his editorial colleagues?remotely, don?t worry!?Digital Editor Clinton Krute and Assistant Editor Devika Girish, to talk about their recent viewing habits and, of course, vent some general concerns about the movies. Some of the movies discussed include V?ra Chytilová?s Daisies, Du?an Makavejev?s A Man Is Not a Bird, and Wes Craven?s A Nightmare on Elm Street.
2020-03-17
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Kleber Mendonça Filho and Juliano Dornelles?s Bacurau

Bacurau is the new film from Brazilian filmmakers Kleber Mendonça Filho and Juliano Dornelles, and it has a pulp thriller premise with a radical heart: a small rural community becomes the target of a mysterious, heavily armed group of foreign white tourists. But the Bacurau residents don?t give up, and the result is what Ela Bittencourt calls, in our March-April issue, ?a blistering portrait of resistance.? You might know the filmmakers from their prior work on Neighboring Sounds and Aquarius. For their latest, Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold sat down with Bittencourt on her recent visit to New York and discussed the film?s resonance with Brazilian history and the filmmakers? consistently thoughtful and dazzling technique. You can also read Bittencourt?s interview with Mendonca Filho and Dornelles in the same issue, and our special interview podcast from the New York Film Festival.
2020-03-13
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Interview: Kelly Reichardt

First Cow is the movie on the lovely cover of our March-April issue, directed by Kelly Reichardt. The setting of the movie is an Oregon frontier town in the 1820s, when newcomers are busily trying to get a foothold in life and in business. Two such newcomers are at the center of First Cow, a cook named Cookie and a fugitive he befriends named King Lu. It?s another chapter in Reichardt?s richly imagined vision of America, a portrait of outsiders and of friendship which also accounts for the unruly forces of commerce and greed. First Cow is now in theaters and it screened last year in the New York Film Festival, where FC Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold spoke with Reichardt between events at Film at Lincoln Center. She generously went into detail about images and the sounds that compose the film?s historical snapshot, as well as the artistic influences. Be sure to check out our features on First Cow in the print magazine as well as our discussion on last week?s podcast.
2020-03-11
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